Understanding and Embracing LGBTQ+ Terminology

Understanding and Embracing LGBTQ+ Terminology
The LGBTQ+ segment is large and growing. An important part of connecting with the segment is understanding and embracing LGBTQ+ terminology. Read on for more information on what terms the community prefers for group and individual identifiers, as well as how and when they prefer to use pronouns.

March 4th, 2021
Jill Rosenfeld – Data Analyst

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When talking about the LGBTQ+ community, there are seemingly endless acronyms, terms, and flags to choose from, and it can be difficult to know which ones to use. Getting terminology right is about more than saying the right word to refer to the right person, it’s about dignity and empathy. Terminology is really a matter of respect: saying I see you, and I affirm your identity. In our recent study, we focused on how the LGBTQ+ community uses community and individual identifiers, as well as pronouns. Continue reading for key insights on each.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our LGBTQ+  Terminology presentation.

Community Identifiers

At Collage Group, we use “LGBTQ+” to refer to any and all people who are anything except straight and cisgender – that is, people who are attracted to their same gender, multiple genders, people who don’t experience sexual attraction, transgender and non-binary people, and a whole host of others that fall under the “plus”.

To lay it out more specifically:

    • L and G: Lesbian and gay, those who are attracted to people of the same gender.
    • B: Bisexual, those attracted to multiple genders.
    • T: Transgender, a term different in kind than the previous three and referring to those who identify with a gender other than the one they were assigned at birth.
    • And finally Q+: Queer and questioning. And the plus refers to all the other labels out there – pansexual, asexual, non-binary, and beyond.

Collage Group uses this term because it allows us to be specific and inclusive, referring to the whole community and the subgroups. There’s a lot of ambiguity in acronyms like these, it’s hard to place firm definitions on people – Everyone is complicated, likely to change and famously resistant to being put in boxes!

When we asked the segment to choose their preferred terms, LGBTQ+ came out on top, followed by LGBTQ. Within subgroups, we see that younger and gender non-conforming people (those identifying as transgender and/or non-binary) were more likely to pick expansive options like LGBTQ+ and LGBTQIA+, and less likely to pick narrower terms like “gay community.” This data shows that young and gender non-conforming people – who are mostly, themselves, young – are more understanding of the diversity of the community and want to recognize it and call it out.

This focus on diversity also shows up in the evolution of the Pride Flag in recent years. While LGBTQ+ people are still most likely to use the traditional rainbow flag to represent the community, younger and gender non-conforming people are gravitating more towards the newer Progress and Intersex Progress Pride flags, which include colors to represent the transgender and intersex communities as well as people of color.

Young and Gender Non-conforming LGBTQ+ People Are Especially Likely to Use “LGBTQ+” as a Community Term

Which of the following terms do you most often use to describe the community of people who do not identify as straight/heterosexual and/or with the gender assigned to them at birth? (LGBTQ+ Respondents)

Total Ages 18-40 Ages 41-75 Gender Non-Conforming Gender Conforming
LGBTQ+ Community
27%
31%
20%
36%
25%
LGBTQ Community
19%
18%
19%
15%
19%
LGBT Community
13%
13%
13%
11%
14%
LGBTQIA+ Community
12%
15%
7%
15%
11%
Gay Community
10%
8%
15%
4%
12%
Queer Community
3%
3%
2%
8%
2%
GLBT Community
1%
0%
2%
1%
1%
I do not use any terms to refer to this community
13%
9%
20%
8%
15%

Individual Identifiers

When it comes to the terms people use to describe themselves, we see an incredible variety and some terms we might expect to be less common are actually resonating with a lot of people. The terms pansexual and queer were very popular (pansexual referring to being attracted to all genders). This reflects the growing idea that sexuality is fluid and people prefer not to put themselves boxes.

We also see 4% and 3% of LGBTQ+ people identifying as asexual and demisexual, respectively. These are terms for people who either do not experience sexual attraction (asexual), and people who only experience sexual attraction to people they feel an emotional connection to (demisexual). We also asked about aromantic and demiromantic. These terms refer to people who never or only sometimes experience romantic attraction.

The separation of romantic and sexual attractions opens a whole other world of terminology, and we could only fit in some of it in the survey. For example, someone might identify as asexual and panromantic, meaning they do not experience sexual attraction but can experience romantic attraction to people of all genders. That’s why we allowed people to choose more than one term here. The ways that people refer to themselves are infinite.

One important thing I need to point out here, based on our methodology, is that these percentages are not supposed to indicate the actual percentage of the LGBTQ+ population that identifies as each of these terms. Because we had a quota system in place to makes sure that we got enough sample from the L, G, B, T, and Q groups, we’ve ended up overrepresenting some and underrepresenting others.

For example, some estimates say that bisexual people make up more than half of the total segment, far more than the 37% of our sample. This likely means that there are even more pansexual and queer people out there too, because “bisexual” is the term more common in surveys and everyday life that these people whose sexuality is fluid or who are attracted to more than one gender are likely to choose.

Younger and Gender Non-conforming People Were More Likely to Choose Labels Including “Pansexual”, “Queer”, and “Asexual”

You mentioned that [previous answer] best describes your sexuality. But, we know those options may be too general to best describe you. From this longer list, which of the following do you identify with? (LGBTQ+ Respondents).

Total Ages 18-40 Ages 41-75 Gender Non-Conforming Gender Conforming
Bisexual
37%
35%
41%
36%
37%
Gay
29%
28%
30%
23%
31%
Lesbian
26%
26%
26%
15%
29%
Pansexual
10%
12%
6%
16%
8%
Queer
8%
11%
4%
17%
6%
Asexual
4%
5%
2%
9%
3%
Demisexual
3%
4%
1%
8%
1%
I'm not sure
2%
2%
2%
7%
1%
Demiromatic
2%
2%
1%
5%
1%
Aromantic
2%
2%
1%
6%
1%

Pronouns

Finally, we wanted to get an idea of people’s opinions about pronouns, and whether it’s appropriate to ask other people to tell you their pronouns. Pronouns are more than just grammar, they’re a part of our identities. About one third of LGBTQ+ people think that others should always ask for other people’s pronouns, and the same amount say that they always put their own pronouns in their social media profiles. A not-insignificant amount of non-LGBTQ+ people say the same – about a quarter of them. Even younger LGBTQ+ people, about half of them, agree that people should always ask for other people’s pronouns. And gender non-conforming people are the most likely of all subgroups to agree, at 65%.

One Third of LGBTQ+ People Say One Should Always Ask about Pronouns

The same number say they always include pronouns on social media profiles:

LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+
People should always ask for other people's prounouns
36%
24%
I put my pronouns in all my social media profiles
36%
24%

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent LGBTQ+ Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Data Analyst

Jill is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2018 graduate from the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity
Collage Group Launches Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program

American consumer attitudes continue to evolve, and to help you keep pace, Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce our new Parents & Kids Program as part of our leading Cultural Intelligence Platform. This new offering, created with input from nearly a dozen Collage members, is designed to cover the insights marketing and consumer insights professionals need to engage and activate parents and kids across race and ethnicity. Based on our scoping, there is no other syndicated resource available that offers full coverage of parents and kids with race and ethnicity overlays.

Fill out the form below for more details on the new program, including reporting breakouts and content.

Why focus on Parents & Kids?

Demographic change amplifies the need to effectively resonate with America’s diverse parents and their children. In fact, the generations most likely to have children are between 5 and 12 percent more racially and ethnically diverse than older generations.

And, multicultural Americans are 10% more likely to have children under 18 living in their households.

Household with Children Under 18 Present Average Household Size
40% Hispanic
3.4 Hispanic
34% Asian
3.0 Asian
27% Black
2.6 Black
23% White
2.4 White

For many brands, the age of kids is also especially important given the development of decision-making processes–our research will dig deeper into this area. From birth to age 3 children are largely dependent on parental decision-making. As children age, they develop more capacity to make their own decisions.

What’s included in the Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program?

Starting this spring, our new Parents & Kids Program will unveil how culture impacts the roles that moms and dads play in their children’s lives, with insights including:

    • the parenting style(s) they embrace
    • the values they prioritize instilling in their kids
    • how they navigate the impact of the changing media landscape and shifting social norms on their children

The Program also provides insight into how the culture, age and gender of the child impacts parental attitudes and behaviors, including:

    • how they respond to their children’s preferences and desires
    • how they select products and services for their kids across category
    • when and how they “hand-off” decision-making to their kids across category

Collage Group is committed to conducting specific research on both parents and kids to provide unparalleled insights, as many brands have a significant gap in their understanding of the way culture impacts parenting and the parent-child decision-making process. We hope you’ll find value in this new research.

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Hispanic Passion Points

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Hispanic Passion Points
What matters most to Hispanic consumers? Collage Group’s latest Multicultural Passion Points study includes key insights into Hispanic consumers to enhance brand engagement and activation.

View our webinar replay and download the attached presentation for key insights and implications:

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life of deep interest to consumers. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. And, they are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into the 8 Passion Points we know are most important to American consumers. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to engage and win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started with our Passion Points research, read on for topline findings on Hispanic consumers, as compared to other racial and ethnic segments.​​

1.) Food

When we asked respondents to rate their interest in cooking and baking, we found that 67% like or love cooking, and 63% like or love baking. Hispanic Americans have an even higher interest in cooking and baking, with 71% saying they like or love cooking and 69% saying they like or love baking. So, why is that the case?

One reason is: Hispanic Americans cook or bake to help them connect with their family’s culture. 35% of Hispanic Americans cook to connect with their culture, compared to just 27% of the total population. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanics particularly enjoy cooking for this reason. But the love of cooking isn’t just about family culture…

Hispanic Americans are also more likely to enjoy cooking for the broader social connections it allows. In our research, we found that 60% of Hispanic Americans say they enjoy cooking and baking with others, and 73% say they like discussing recipes with others. This desire for connection speaks to Hispanic Americans’ group trait of warmth, which is characterized by a drive to build meaningful relationships and an openness towards others.

Hispanic Americans Love to Both Cook and Bake

% of each segment that likes or loves cooking

% of each segment that likes or loves baking

2.) Travel

When we asked respondents how they feel about traveling, most (72%) said they like or love it. Hispanic Americans are particularly fond of traveling, with 78% saying they like or love it. Unacculturated Hispanics especially enjoy traveling. Data from 2021’s Passion Point research suggests that the greater desire to travel is likely tied to having family and friends that live outside of the United States.

When forced to choose whether vacation is about relaxing or doing exciting things, most Hispanic Americans (57%) said relaxing. However, when we look by New Wave (individuals aged 18-42) and Old Guard (individuals age 43-76), we see that younger Hispanics seek out travel that is “exciting.”

Younger Americans Uniquely Seek Out Adventurous Travel

Which of the following statements do you agree with most, even if neither is entirely correct?

Total Population Total Hispanic New Wave Hispanic (18-42) Old Guard Hispanic (43-76)

For me, going on vacation is about relaxing

59%
57%
51%
63%

For me, going on vacation is about doing exciting things

41%
43%
49%
37%

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Health and Wellness Across Gender

Health and Wellness Across Gender
Men and Women have unique perspectives, needs, and experiences related to health insurance and health care. Keep reading for key insights, and a downloadable deck to help your brand or organization better connect with these segments.
 

Americans are increasingly embracing a consumer mindset when it comes to healthcare. Men and Women alike are shopping around, comparing prices, and seeking more information than they have in the past. They are doing this because heath care has changed – it has expanded choice and shifted costs.

To win in this constantly evolving space, brands and organizations need to understand men and women’s unique health-related perspectives and how they impact their engagement with health insurers and providers.

Collage Group’s 2021/2022 Health & Wellness Study leverages data captured from more than 3,500 Americans to help brands understand how health-related attitudes and behaviors differ by gender. Our research reveals how an emerging consumer mindset impacts Americans engagement with both the health insurance and health care provider space. We explore barriers to insurance coverage, drivers and barriers to trust and satisfaction, provider preferences, receptivity to provider advice, and more.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

#1: Affordability is the Top Barrier for the Uninsured

The high cost of healthcare for Americans is not news, we know that men and women both face increasing costs and are seeking ways to offset them. But for women, costs are even higher earlier in life, thanks to increased incidence of many chronic conditions, as well as the healthcare costs associated with their reproductive years. This leads many to cut costs by forgoing care or insurance altogether – lack of affordability is the top reason why uninsured women don’t have coverage.

Affordability is also the top reason why men don’t have insurance, albeit at a much lower rate. But what’s interesting – and actionable for healthcare brands – is that men are twice as likely as women to say that they don’t have health insurance because they don’t know how to purchase it. They’re also twice as likely to say they don’t have health insurance because they don’t need it.

Best Practice: The Nevada Health Link took a creative approach to attracting the cost conscious uninsured. Their creative campaign titled, “You Can’t Afford to Not Be Insured”, highlighted the savings insurance provides when faced with a variety of common ailments compared to paying out of pocket – presenting insurance as a relative value.

#2: Men Seek Insurance Partnership Through Communication

Communication with their health insurance provider is particularly important for New Wave Men – those who are 26-41 in this study. When asked what insurance companies might do to be seen as a partner rather than a barrier in improving health, New Wave men were significantly more likely to say “If I had a person at the insurance company I could easily communicate with.”

New Wave Men Seek Insurance Partnership

Best Practice: The state of Minnesota health insurance exchange, or “MNSure”, recently ran a campaign highlighting the communication support provided to those seeking to enroll. MNSure utilizes a network of “assisters” who provide 1:1 support on social channels, year round. The ads seen below were designed to be shared by the assister network across social channels, so individuals could reach out to the assisters directly to receive support, or through the provided contact information.

MNSure Highlights Certified Navigators

#3: New Wave Women Have Endured Negative Healthcare Services, Leading to Lower Healthcare Satisfaction  

Of all segments we looked at in this study, younger women (26-41yrs old) have the lowest level of satisfaction of their health care providers. And the unfortunate truth behind this number seems to be that they have simply had more negative experiences with health care providers in the past. In fact, younger women are significantly more likely to have experienced literally every negative experience we asked about – from doctors rushing through visits and not listening to them, to lifestyle judgment and pressured decision making.

The silver lining of the negative experiences women have had in the past is that they now know what they want from health care providers. Women want personalized care, from doctors who understand their unique healthcare needs, and they want it delivered in a way that is efficient and effective.

Young women most likely to receive bad service

Best Practice: Recognizing that the needs of women weren’t being completely met through traditional providers, Maven Health set up gap-filling coverage tailored to the needs of women. Maven provides detailed information from the comfort of an app, but also personal concierge service and virtual visits with regular providers to ensure women get the personal support they want.

Health care preferences

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Health Care Across Generations

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Health Care Across Generations
Each generation approaches the patient journey from a unique perspective. Keep reading for key insights and a  downloadable deck on generational differences in health-related attitudes and behaviors and the emerging consumer mindset.
 

Health and wellness are top of mind for consumers. With healthcare costs higher than ever, Americans are acting more and more as “consumers” when it comes to their healthcare and health insurance. They want to get bang for their buck by being more choosy and “shopping around.” As a result, they’re more sensitive to price and  think even more critically about their symptoms before deciding it’s necessary to seek care. And when they do, many are turning to cost-effective options like virtual care.

The rise of consumerism in healthcare means you’ve got to be thinking about all the levers that traditional service-oriented businesses have leaned on to win consumers. Highlighting and providing excellent service and competitive cost are two that many in healthcare still struggle with. To win consumers and provide them optimal care, you must understand how these factors are constantly shifting consumers’ expectations, needs, and desires.

Collage Group’s 2021/2022 Health & Wellness Study covers generational differences in healthcare-related attitudes and behaviors. Our research reveals how the emerging consumer mindset affects each generation’s attitudes and behaviors in healthcare.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

#1: Gen X and Boomers emphasize doctors’ qualitative attributes, so provide bios that allow each individual doctor’s strengths to shine and focus your marketing efforts on how your organization stands out with excellent service. Your organization has exceptional talent, so make sure you get the credit for it!

What is important when considering a doctor

#2: Gen Z and Millennials emphasize their doctor’s identity attributes, so add filters (gender, race, etc.) to provider search tools to allow them to refine their search for a doctor they value. It’s important to make it easy for them to find a doctor they feel comfortable with. Finding a doctor with shared identity can also help them to feel less anxious.

Doctor preference

Executional Example

Indianapolis-based Community Health Network differentiates their medical facilities by highlighting the exceptional care they offer. Their creative showcases their patient-centric values and community-driven approach (the audio track in the ad was even performed by Community Health Network employees!). The ad affirms the network’s focus on service by communicating the diversity in their providers, showing that every patient can find a doctor who will listen to and understand their unique needs.

To bolster the themes in their creative campaign, Community Health Network has a robust provider search tool on their website. Each doctor has a short bio and an introduction video so that patients can evaluate them on a more personal level beyond their credentials. They can hear their voice and see their smile—as well as learn about their passions in healthcare and their approach as a physician. The website’s search tool allows patients to filter by different attributes like gender and language. The site even has a section for reviews.

Community Health Network screenshot

#3: Younger Americans have a more self-sufficient health perspective. They also say that feeling worried or anxious is the top reason they avoid care. Help them feel more empowered in their health by giving them some control over their health journey. This will help grow their trust and inspire confidence in themselves.

Executional Example

Virtual care company LetsGetChecked was founded in 2015 with the goal of empowering people to manage their own health from home. They provide at-home sample collection kits which can be sent to healthcare facilities for results. They also provide telehealth services. This innovative healthcare approach caters to the unique needs of younger Americans who want control and self-sufficiency in their health journey, and simultaneously are anxious and turned-off by conventional healthcare services.

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Health and Wellness Across Sexual Identities

Health and Wellness Across Sexual Identities
LGBTQ+ Americans have unique perspectives, needs, and experiences related to healthcare that brands must understand. Keep reading for key insights, a downloadable deck, and webinar replay that will help your brand or organization better understand and connect with these segments.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Health and Wellness Across Sexual Identities presentation.

Rapid changes in societal norms over the past several years are continuing to pave the way for a more inclusive and welcoming America. The greater acceptance many young people now experience affords an opportunity to openly identify as LGBTQ+ with less risk for social stigma and discrimination. As a result, we continue to see growth in the number of Americans who identify as LGBTQ+. To win in this constantly evolving space, brands and organizations must understand LGBTQ+ Americans’ unique health-related needs and how these impact their engagement with health insurers and providers.

Collage Group’s 2021/2022 Health & Wellness Study leverages data captured from more than 3,500 Americans to help brands understand how health-related attitudes and behaviors differ by sexual identity. Our research reveals how an emerging consumer mindset impacts Americans engagement with both the health insurance and health care provider space. We explore barriers to insurance coverage, drivers and barriers to trust and satisfaction, provider preferences, receptivity to provider advice, and more.

Take a look at a few key insights and implications:

#1. The LGBTQ+ population is less likely to have health insurance than others. Affordability issues and distrust in health care have led to lower insurance rates among LGBTQ+ Americans. Position yourself as a partner in their health journey and prove yourself trustworthy by offering targeted services to address their unique needs

LGBTQ+ are more likely to be uninsured

Best Practice: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island is addressing LGBTQ+ Americans’ barriers to coverage with an easy to find resource page on their website to connect patients with providers that are inclusive and LGBTQ+ friendly.

BCSBRI has its own LGBTQ+ safe zones

#2: LGBTQ+ Americans are less satisfied with their current medical care in part because of past negative experiences. More poor interactions with health care providers leads to avoiding care in the future and, ultimately, poorer health outcomes (see the full presentation for supporting data and details on the LGBTQ+ experience with health care).

LGBTQ+ are more likely to have negative doctor experiences

#3: LGBTQ+ Americans want affirming care that is sensitive to their unique needs, but they don’t need to see LGBTQ+ providers to get that level of care. Make sure your providers and staff are trained in culturally competent care for the LGBTQ+ community.

OutCare provides Online Culturally Competent Training

Best Practice: In addition to providing various resources – like an LGBTQ+ friendly provider list – OutCare offers online training to help health care providers develop cultural competency for the segment. Trainings like these are a great way to increase the quality of care provided to LGBTQ+ individuals.

OutCare provides Online Culturally Competent Training

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

CHALLENGE

The Diverse Segments team of a major Financial Services & Banking brand has a dedicated focus on understanding the specific needs and preferences of consumers to help inform culturally relevant and authentic in-market executions. While the team partners with many market research vendors, they came to Collage Group to add depth to their insights across multicultural and generational consumers in the U.S.  

While the team had developed many successful dedicated advertising executions across the years that speak to cultural nuances, the Financial Services & Banking brand approached Collage Group with a new challenge. They wanted to prove that cultural insights can be applied to create campaigns that widely resonate across the total market, as well. 

SOLUTION

Collage Group has supported many brands in this effort with more than 10 years of quantifiable data evaluating more than 300 brands and ads. The data overwhelmingly shows that culturally resonate advertising featuring a specific segment can and will resonate across broader audiences if done in an authentic, relatable way. This is counter to the thinking that brands face a “trade-off” when deciding between a culturally nuanced dedicated ad aimed at a specific consumer segment and a more generic total market execution.

 

Collage Group partnered with the Financial Services & Banking brand to recommend a solution that would apply the CultureRate:Brand and Ad evaluation methodology in depth across its brand and ads. The result aimed to illuminate that it is possible to break the “genpop vs. targeted” trade-off specifically among the financial sector, helping the Financial Services & Banking brand escape the trap of being generic or forgettable. Further, the solution included key takeaways for the brand to understand where and how they rank among their competitors, and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments.

CultureRate:Ad Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Ad, the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads were put to the test as part of a suite of rigorous methodologies that helped brands navigate the rapidly shifting consumer landscape. The ads were evaluated on two metrics: the Ad Cultural Fluency Quotient (A- CFQ) and Backlash, both of which are supported with an exhaustive range of diagnostic metrics.
    • A-CFQ is Collage Group’s proprietary KPI that uses four factors to optimally predict high brand favorability and purchase intent.
    • Backlash metrics take conventional brand favorability a step further by quantifying the degree to which an ad can “flip” perception from positive to negative or vice versa.
Combining A-CFQ and Backlash metrics for target segments revealed the dynamics that made for the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads successful, or unsuccessful, as compared to their competitors.

CultureRate:Brand Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Brand, the brand was evaluated on the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ), which measures how well brands are resonating with consumers. It assessed the Financial Services & Banking brand along six key cultural dimensions: brand fit, relevance, memories, values, trust and advocacy. The B-CFQ Threshold then helped illuminate for the Financial Services & Banking brand whether their B-CFQ score was high enough to lead to increased brand favorability and purchase intent.

RESULTS

As a result of the CultureRate:Ad and Brand evaluations, Collage Group provided key insight into how the the Financial Services & Banking company’s brand and ads are performing across each diverse consumer segment – Hispanic, Black, Asian and NH-White consumers – as well as by Hispanic Acculturation level.

 

The findings – which evaluated the Financial Services & Banking company vs. its financial service competitors – showed, that while it may be harder for those in the financial space to develop cultural connections with consumers overall, there are still clear winners that have broken through to resonate with multiple segments simultaneously.

 

Evaluating how the Financial Services & Banking brand performed within each consumer segment, as well as in direct relation to their key competitors, enabled the Financial Services & Banking brand to understand their competitive positioning and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments. This work was then shared across the Diverse Segments team to illuminate, and take action on, where the brand was winning and identify opportunities for growth.

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Healthcare Across Race and Ethnicity

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Health & Wellness Across Race & Ethnicity
Multicultural Americans have unique perspectives, needs, and experiences related to health care that brands must understand. Keep reading for key insights that will help your brand or organization better understand and connect with these segments.

A rapidly growing multicultural population and the emerging consumer mindset are changing consumer demands on healthcare. To win in this constantly evolving space, brands and organizations need to understand multicultural Americans’ unique health-related perspectives, needs, and experiences and how these impact their engagement with health insurers and providers.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

Collage Group’s 2021/2022 Health & Wellness Study leverages data captured from more than 3,500 Americans to help brands understand how health-related attitudes and behaviors differ by racial and ethnic segments. Our research reveals how the emerging consumer mindset affects Americans in both the health insurance and health care provider space. We explore barriers to insurance coverage, drivers of and barriers to trust and satisfaction, provider preferences, willingness to follow provider advice, and more.

Here are a few key insights and implications:

#1. There is room for growth in overall satisfaction with medical care across all multicultural segments and age groups. To improve satisfaction, focus on building trust and humanizing the health care experience.

Over half of Americans are satisfied with their health care

Pfizer’s ad (shown below) seeks to gain trust with Black Americans by first acknowledging that the segment’s distrust in the health care system is understandable given the discrimination and injustice they have experienced. The spot then notes that this lack of participation means Black Americans may not be getting the best care they could, and that greater representation in research will ultimately lead to better care. It ends with a call to action to have more Black Americans participate in clinical trials.

#2: Multicultural consumers want doctors who take the time to understand their cultural backgrounds. Prioritize culturally competent care through services in multiple languages, training on different cultural norms and preferences, and ensuring there is staff who look like them.

Multicultural segments more likely to value doctors

Kaiser Permanente has made a name for itself as a leader in culturally competent care. Marketing messaging highlights the translation services the system offers in over 100 languages, the fact that over 60% of their staff are multicultural, and the training  staff receive on culturally appropriate etiquette and care.

Kaiser Permanente Prioritizes Culturally Competent Care

#3: Family is important to Multicultural consumers during their health care journey, especially Hispanic Americans. Make sure that the health care process is focused on both the patient themselves and the family members.

3 in 10 have a friend or family member with them when receiving care

Marketers should highlight the ways their organizations support family engagement. Below are several things that can signal your organization is family-friendly and keen to provide support beyond the patient.

Health Care Providers Catering to Family Need

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How Americans Feel About the Olympic Games

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How Americans Feel About the Olympic Games
People around the world will soon be captivated by the spectacle of the 2022 Winter Olympics. Read on for Insights on how multicultural Americans experience and follow the Olympics curated from our 2021 Holidays and Occasions research.
 

On February 4th the 2022 Winter Olympics will officially begin in Beijing, China. While these Olympics will look different than past competitions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and a diplomatic boycott by countries including the United States, Australia, Britain, and Canada, millions of people around the world will still tune in to see their nations’ best athletes compete in skiing, skating, and more.

American’s attitudes and habits surrounding the Olympics often differ by race and ethnicity. For example, almost two-thirds of Black, Asian, and White Americans say that watching the Olympics makes them feel proud to be American, but this figure is closer to half of Hispanic Americans. When investigating deeper into acculturation-level data, we see that only about 4 in 10 Unacculturated Hispanic Americans feel a sense of patriotism during the Olympics, while Acculturated Hispanic Americans are closer to the other segments at 62%. Since Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely to be immigrants to the United States, they may have an additional rooting interest in their home countries during the Olympics.

Most Americans Say the Olympic Games Give Sense of Pride

Cultural duality is at the forefront of many Hispanic Americans’ identities and manifests elsewhere in their feelings about the Olympics. Hispanic Americans are the most likely of any racial or ethnic segment to see the Olympics as a great occasion to build unity among different countries. And these attitudes make them more likely to consume Olympics content as well. Sixty-eight percent of Hispanic Americans say they watch sports during the Olympics they otherwise wouldn’t watch, which is higher than all other groups and significantly higher than White Americans.

Hispanic Audiences View More Sports Only During Olympic Games

Understanding the Hispanic community’s love of the Olympics and desire to have content in Spanish, NBC and its subsidiary Telemundo aired over 300 hours of Spanish-language events during the 2020 Summer Olympics, specifically featuring soccer, basketball, baseball, and volleyball. They also sent famous Hispanic sports figures to the Olympics in Tokyo to provide live commentary.

Multicultural Audiences and the Olympic Games

Advertising around the Olympics can be tricky due to the International Olympic Committee’s strict rules around using their copyrighted logos and trademarks. It’s even trickier this time around, as China is being accused of human rights abuses that have led to several diplomatic boycotts and calls for existing advertisers to drop out as well. Regardless of the host country, the Olympics are a chance for athletes who have worked their entire lives on their sports to show off their skills. Focusing on them and their incredible achievements could be a great way to invoke the sense of American pride and unity that many report feeling during the Games.

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