Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

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Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

Collage Group joins The Quirk’s Event for a Conversation About Understanding & Engaging Multicultural America Now.

June 29, 2022
David Wellisch – CEO and Co-Founder

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It’s no secret that over the past two years, multicultural consumers have changed how they evaluate and view brands.

But, do brands truly know how multicultural American consumers’—responsible for more than 100 percent of total population growth—have changed since the unprecedented social, economic and public health upheavals since 2020? Or how to effectively engage them through advertising?

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from the presentation and read on for further insights.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now presentation.

To answer this question and more, I was joined by my colleagues David Evans, Collage Group Chief Insights Officer, and Jack Mackinnon, Director of Product & Content, to present at the Quirk’s Event in New York City: a valuable collection of sessions and networking opportunities with leaders in the marketing research and insights field.

In the first part of our session, which included highlights from our “America Now” study, Jack Mackinnon unveiled key changes in Asian, Black and Hispanic consumers’ attitudes and priorities since 2020. Attendees learned what these changes in perspectives mean for their brands, such as how to support the changing landscape of diverse American consumers.

One key takeaway from America Now: when brands that act on social movements, they are more likely to connect with multicultural consumers. However, brands also must accurately portray diverse stories and communities while ensuring that they are being authentic themselves.

Currently, many multicultural Americans are not satisfied with how they are being portrayed by brands. Which means there is an important opportunity for brands to explore how they are portraying multicultural consumers and ensure those representations are authentic. Consumers want brands to portray race and ethnicity accurately, but also want them to include the unique stories that are often not portrayed in advertising. This requires brands dig deeper into multicultural Americans and their stories and develop the diverse advertising campaigns more likely to connect across multicultural consumer groups.

Furthermore, shying away from action on social movements can be harmful for brands, specifically among younger consumer groups, and requires much more than running diverse ad campaigns. In fact, 25% of Black consumers and 21% of Hispanic consumers say they will stop buying from brands that do not take a stance on a social or political issues that are important to them. And for all multicultural consumers, they want to see diversity woven throughout the organization, including internal diversity vs. simply limiting support for a cause to an advertising campaign.

So then how do brands ensure they are connecting with multicultural Americans authentically? The answer is in embedding Cultural Fluency throughout the organization–to engage efficiently and effectively across consumer segments.

In his presentation explaining the “halo effect” of diverse advertising, David Evans explained that Cultural Fluency is an emerging marketing mandate that can no longer be understood as a sideshow to the main act of “mainstream marketing.” It’s a necessary component for connection and growth among multicultural American consumers.

David explained that Culturally Fluent ads that aim to connect with a single story or community can have a halo effect across other consumer segments. For example, many Black and Hispanic centered segmented campaigns halo across other segments, allowing brands to reach even more consumers authentically, especially if the focus is on the “story”. Further White consumers are also responding well to multicultural ads.

We know this because help brands succeed with Cultural Fluent advertising, Collage Group created CultureRate, which leverages 10+ years of research and expertise in the survey design methods needed to understand diverse America. CultureRate is generating 30+ million datapoints annually, with nearly one million consumer responses collected since 2018. It allows our research team–and member brands–to reference the largest database of culturally focused consumer response to ads and brands growing at an annual rate of 100-120 ads, 50,000 of responses or 9 million datapoints.

From an deep analysis of this database, David and his team have unveiled 4 key areas for advertisers to take action on to increase their ROI from the halo effects. Download the excerpt above from the presentation to learn more.

Thank you again to our peers and partners at Quirk’s Media for the opportunity to share this important research. Contact us below to learn how membership to our cultural intelligence platform will help your brand harness cultural insights for growth.

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David Wellisch

David Wellisch
CEO and Co-Founder

David Wellisch is CEO & Co-Founder of Collage Group, a consumer insights and intelligence company with a focus on research exploring race/ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender. Since the inception of Collage Group in 2009, David has led the company through growth, now serving more than 200 brands in across 15 industries. David is passionate about entrepreneurship and company building, and often works directly with members to help guide the integration of multicultural consumer insights and marketing strategies.

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Hispanic Americans Leading the Way in Tech Tools and Technology Usage

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Hispanic Americans Are Leading the Way in Tech Tools and Technology Usage

New Collage Group research shows that Hispanic Americans are trendsetters in using technology. As a segment, they are super users of the internet, social media, and tech tools. 

July 26, 2022
David EvansChief Insights Officer

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Hispanic consumers are more likely to post daily on social media and they use a great deal of social media platforms, including TikTok, according to our latest research. Of course, as a whole, Americans are using such instruments to a higher degree compared to previous years. However, Hispanic Americans surpassed all groups’ usage rates.

The findings are a result of our study: “Hispanic Passion Points,” which was recently released to Collage Group member brands. Passion Points are part of our consumer fundamentals research and seek to offer deep insight into the activities and areas of life consumer segments prioritize.

Our intent is to provide insights that go beyond the preconceptions most brands and marketers have about Hispanic and other diverse-led segments. In this case, the insight is that, for Hispanics, tech savviness is interwoven into a great deal of aspects of Hispanic culture and how it’s evolving.

The findings show that it is the Hispanic culture itself that directly leads to this group using tech to such a high degree. Hispanic Americans are very engaged in a wide variety of hobbies and interests where they seek connection and community – activities that can both directly and indirectly include technology.

An example of this is seen in ordinary activities, such as cooking and baking. Cooking and baking are a key Passion Point for Hispanics. As part of the survey, Hispanic Americans said cooking helps them be closer to loved ones and helps build meaningful relationships. According to this segment, presentation is an important aspect of cooking.

This insight is tied to the segment’s prolific tech use as the Passion Points study found that Hispanic Americans are posting pictures on social media about their cooking and dining out experiences. Forty-six percent said they post pictures of the foods they cook and 42% said they share photos of the foods they eat while at restaurants. Both of these figures are significantly higher than the total American population.

Exercise is another Passion Point for Hispanics. Among those polled, 64% of Hispanic Americans said they work out simply because they enjoy it, which is 15% higher than the total population, and highest across all racial / ethnic segments. Additionally, Hispanic Americans use a number of tech tools to aid in their fitness routine. Nearly a third of them use online free workout videos in their efforts to remain or get in shape, and 16% use a workout app.

The act of playing video games is another Passion Point for Hispanic Americas. To the tune of 50%, Hispanic Americans said they like or love playing video games. Moreover, Collage Group research shows that, when viewed by age, it is revealed that younger Hispanics – those between the ages of 18 and 42 – are more likely to prefer video games vs. board games or card games. Almost half – 46% – stated that they play video games in order to play with other people from around the world. Also, similar to the Passion Point about exercise, Hispanic Americans when compared to other groups, show to be more interested than others in using video games as part of their fitness routine.

The “Hispanic Passion Points” study is an update from Collage Group’s annual Passion Points survey last fielded in May 2022. The survey is a nationally representative sample of 4,514 consumers, including 1,300 Hispanic consumers.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology – July 2022 Update

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology – 2022 Update
Understanding and embracing multicultural terminology is a key component of connecting with diverse America. This study reports findings from our July 2022 Multicultural Terminology update. It offers key findings and action steps brands can use to signal empathy, understanding, and respect to multicultural consumers.

July 25, 2022
Bryan Miller – Director, Syndicated and Solutions

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Getting language and labels right is a key component of authentically engaging across America’s diverse consumer segments. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to know which terminology to use given shifting consumer priorities and the challenges this creates for brands.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology presentation.

To help our members navigate these tricky linguistic waters, we fielded a survey to 4,497 respondents between the ages of 18 and 76 in June 2022. The aim of this survey was to understand the racial and ethnic terminology that Hispanic, Black, and Asian Americans prefer so brands can make data-driven decisions when selecting what terms to use. This study reports our findings, focusing on the nuances of segment-specific terms and consumer preferences towards terms like HispanicLatinoLatinaLatinxBlackAfrican AmericanAsian, and Asian American.

Insights and marketing professionals can use these findings to craft outreach and messaging that respects consumer preferences and signals empathy and understanding. Additionally, the double clicks we offer by acculturation level, generation, and country of origin, when relevant, allow brands to better understand and speak to sub-segments that may have diverging preferences. Below are five key findings and action steps to keep in mind as you craft your strategy to achieve greater connection with diverse America.

Five Key Findings and Action Steps

    1. Hispanic Americans are most positive towards Hispanic and Latino/Latina as terms to refer to the segment as a whole. This holds across generation and country of origin. Use either of these terms when you need to refer to Hispanic Americans in general. If your target is Latin Americans living in the US (including those that do not speak Spanish), defer to Latino/Latina.
    2. Latinx continues to be a polarizing term, though younger Hispanics are more likely to feel positive towards it. Use Latinx if you wish to signal support for the efforts the term was introduced to address, but recognize you may fail to connect and even experience backlash as a result.
    3. Black Americans are generally positive towards both Black and African American as general descriptors. Use African-American to signal connection with the history of Black people in America, including past and current struggles for equality and justice. Use Black if you are hoping to signal inclusivity of individuals that are Black but may not connect with the history of Black people in America, such as recent immigrants from Africa or the Caribbean. This term can also signal connection with current struggles for equality and justice.
    4. Asian Americans are most positive towards Asian and Asian American as terms to refer to the segment as a whole. This holds across generation and most countries of origin. Use either of these terms when you need to refer to Asian Americans in general.
    5. Pacific Islanders express more negative sentiment towards all of the general descriptor terms except for People of Color. Consider using Country of Origin or Country of Origin-American if you are specifically referring to Americans of Pacific Island descent to minimize risk of backlash.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Bryan Miller

Bryan Miller
Director, Syndicated and Solutions

As Director of Content, Bryan leads the content team that produces all of Collage Group’s syndicated research and oversees the AdRate and BrandRate ratings products. Bryan holds a Master of Arts from Georgia State University’s Philosophy and Brains & Behavior Program, a Master of Science in Applied Economics from the University of North Dakota, and a Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in the Philosophy of Science, the Philosophy of Psychology and Bioethics. Outside of work, Bryan is a passionate film buff and lover of great food.

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