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Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Asian American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 1, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Asian Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Asian Americans Are Passionate about Cooking and Cook Meals to Maintain Cultural Traditions

Asian Americans rely on cooking and baking to maintain their cultural traditions.

Context:

Cooking traditional recipes connects Asian Americans with their cultural backgrounds. Food is a central part of their community and the places they are from, and they want to honor that in the kitchen.

Action Step:

    • In advertising, highlight Asian Americans love for traditional meals and cooking either subtly or overtly.
    • Offer examples of how your brand can help Asian Americans keep their love for traditional meals alive.

Key Finding #2: Asian Travelers Enjoy Overseas Adventures

Asian Americans love to travel internationally both to connect with their heritage and to have new cultural experiences.

Context:

Two thirds of Asian Americans are foreign born, and the other third are very likely to be second generation Americans. Their relatively recent immigration stories mean they are likely to still have personal and emotional connections with their country of origin. Traveling internationally helps them to connect with their heritage.

Asian Americans are also inquisitive, and they like to travel to experience new foods and different cultures than their own.

Action Step:

    • Engage with Asian American travelers by emphasizing the personal connections they have across global locations.
    • Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.
    • Stimulate Asian American’s curiosity for different cultures and lifestyles by inspiring them to create new memories abroad.

Key Finding #3: Asian Americans Share a Unique Passion for Fitness and Exercise

Asian Americans lead the multicultural segment in having a passion for fitness and exercise, especially walking and doing yoga. They over-index on the use of multiple types of gyms and gym equipment.

Context:

Asian Americans consistently prioritize their health and fitness because they are health focused. They choose a variety of ways to be active but similar to most Americans, walking wins. That’s probably because it’s pretty easy to do!

Action Step:

    • Help Asian Americans understand how your brand can be a part of their healthy lifestyle.

Key Finding #4: Younger Asian Americans Express Themselves Through Fashion

Younger Asian Americans see fashion as a way to express their individuality.

Context:

Asian Americans aren’t afraid to make fashion choices that are bold and unique. They are pioneers in streetwear culture because of the ways they can express themselves through their clothing and accessories. Streetwear also means comfortable clothing, something else that Asian Americans prefer in their fashion!

Action Step:

    • Show how your brand can make Asian Americans feel comfortable while still staying true to themselves and expressing who they are.

Key Finding #5: Asian Americans are Analytical Gamers

Asian Americans share an interest in analog and digital strategic thinking games.

Context:

Asian Americans are analytical and like to think about their options before making decisions. Games that require thinking before making a final decision (e.g., word games or crossword puzzles, chess) provide an example of their analytical mindset.

Action Step:

    • Capture the attention of Asian Americans by focusing on strategic thinking games or highlighting them playing these types of games in your advertising.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Asian Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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Passion Points are the activities that get people excited. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Food Is for Socializing

LGBTQ+ Americans love to share their food experience (IRL and online) with other people.

Context:

LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to value being hospitable and congenial with others. They’re also more likely to “consider someone ‘family’ if we are really close, even if we’re not related.” So, sharing experiences with others is a central part of their daily lives.

The LGBTQ+ segment also skews young, so social media and digital communications are second nature. That extends to using those mediums to consume and share pictures, videos, and information about food and meals.

Action Step:

    • Celebrate meals. When representing LGBTQ+ Americans and their food experiences, remember to highlight the social aspects of making food and eating together.
    • Feed LGBTQ+ Americans’ feeds with digital food content. Recipes, inspiration, influencers, and food events are all of interest for these “foodies.”

Key Finding #2: LGBTQ+ Travelers Seek Adventure

LGBTQ+ Americans of all ages and younger non-LGBTQ+ Americans enjoy getting out of their comfort zone when they travel.

Context:

While finding travel locations welcoming of LGBTQ+ travelers is important, LGBTQ+ Americans also love to explore new cultures and enjoy new experiences. They’re unique Group Trait of Worldly highlights their penchant to be open-minded, cosmopolitan and experiential.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize new and the exciting travel opportunities for LGBTQ+ Americans. The world is big and interesting; Help them discover it.

Key Finding #3: Video Game Fandom Provides Community for the LGBTQ+ Segment

Younger LGBTQ+ Americans uniquely love video games and see them as a vehicle for self-expression and socializing.

Context: LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely than others to value being unique and creative. The segment also prioritizes happiness and fun in their lives. It’s no doubt, then, why LGBTQ+ consumers would flock to video games as a way of enjoying life and creative storytelling. All the better to experience it with friends. Action Step:
    • Emphasize the social dynamic of video games and celebrate the expressive possibility of joining others in playing your favorite game.

Key Finding #4: LGBTQ+ People Are Social Sports Fans

LGBTQ+ Americans may be less interested in following sports, in general, but they are more likely than others to host sports-viewing parties and go to sports bars to watch games with other people.

Context:

As a segment, LGBTQ+ Americans value being hospitable and congenial higher than other Americans. They also are more likely to say they consider someone “family” if they’re close, but not actually related.

Connecting with others is a deep priority for this segment and sports and fitness is a key way many LGBTQ+ Americans choose to build relationships with others.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize the social aspects of fandom when engaging LGBTQ+ Americans. It’s not so much about the teams or the players, it’s about the fans.

Key Finding #5: LGBTQ+ Americans Use Style to Uniquely Express Themselves

Fashion is a stand-out Passion Point for LGBTQ+ Americans. They see themselves as fashionable and enjoy self-expression and bold choices in their style.

Context:

For many LGBTQ+ Americans, celebrating their uniqueness is not only fun, but also an essential element of discovering themselves. Fashion provides a creative, expressive, and individual outlet for celebrating their own identities externally.

And given how challenging it can be to come out when society isn’t always welcoming, the desire to embrace style and fashion towards self-identity cuts across age and generation.

Action Step:

    • Lean into fashion with LGBTQ+ consumers and don’t be afraid to push some boundaries and innovate. Remember: Style is a tool of self-expression, so use it as a communication tool to this fashion-forward segment.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Insights for Authentic LGBTQ+ Representation in Media

Insights for Authentic LGBTQ+ Representation in Media
The LGBTQ+ segment is large and growing. An important part of connecting with the segment is understanding LGBTQ+ consumers’ preferences around advertising and media content. Read on for more information on how your brand can build a stronger connection with LGBTQ+ people through your advertising.

As the LGBTQ+ community grows in both size and visibility, LGBTQ+ people consider their sexuality to be more important to their identity than ever before. As a result, the segment expects more authentic representation in advertising and media.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

Advertising

Including LGBTQ+ representation in advertising and showing support for the LGBTQ+ community matters to these consumers. LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to buy from brands that show support for LGBTQ+ people (60%) and feature LGBTQ+ people in their advertising (45%). LGBTQ+ consumers want to be seen as everyday consumers, just like everyone else, which is why it’s important for brands to normalize LGBTQ+ representation across all of their advertising campaigns, not just those for Pride Month.

Brands can also show support by addressing LGBTQ+ pain points specific to your product or service area, which can then be turned into an advertising campaign. An example of a brand excecuting this is Mastercard in their “True Card” ad campaign. In the ad, Mastercard details how True Name credit and debit cards help members of the LGBTQ+ community, particularly transgender and non-binary people, by allowing them to have financial products with their self-identified chosen first name.

Getting Involved

LGBTQ+-focused advertising campaigns should also be accompanied by social and political action. LGBTQ+ Americans, especially those who are younger, believe companies have an obligation to help make political and social change. Almost half of young LGBTQ+ respondents agreed that brands and companies should focus on social and political issues even if they don’t directly relate to their products or services. Overall, most LGBTQ+ respondents prefer brands to get involved by educating consumers about LGBTQ+ rights and discrimination. However, young LGBTQ+ people would also like to see brands hire more LGBTQ+ individuals in leadership positions and donate to LGBTQ+ causes.

Media

LGBTQ+ Americans are largely unimpressed with the current state of representation in movies and TV.  Almost half of the segment says most LGBTQ+ stories in films and TV are inauthentic and stereotypical.

Representation

LGBTQ+ Americans want to see more LGBTQ+ performers and LGBTQ+ creatives involved in the creative direction of LGBTQ+ stories, not only because representation is important but because it’s needed to create authentic stories.  LGBTQ+ people were most interested in seeing a more diverse range of LGBTQ+ people in entertainment media. This is especially important to those who are underrepresented today, like transgender and non-binary people. A quarter of LGBTQ+ Americans say they would like to see more stories of diverse groups of LGBTQ+ people, and this grows to 30% of transgender and non-binary people.

LGBTQ+ Americans Want Happy Stories

According to the data, almost half of the community feels that LGBTQ+ stories in entertainment focus too much on the hardships of the LGBTQ+ experience. Many LGBTQ+ people told us they want to see more content featuring LGBTQ+ people living happy lives that does not include homophobia.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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America Now: Gen Z Women Key Issue – Sexism

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America Now: Gen Z Women Key Issue – Sexism

This research is part of a series that expands on our 2021 Roundtable Presentation, America Now. Read on to learn how Gen Z women stand out for their prioritization of reducing sexism.

2017 was a pivotal year for women in the U.S. The day after President Trump was inaugurated, millions of Americans across the U.S. participated in the largest single-day protest – The Women’s March – to support gender equality and protest the President’s anti-women statements. Later that year, the #MeToo movement gained momentum as more women broke their silence as survivors of sexual abuse and revealed the prevalence of sexual violence against women. With increased visibility on women’s issues, women have reported that their gender identity has become more important to them over the past few years. This is especially true of Gen Z women; 55% agree that their gender is now a more important aspect of their identity than it used to be. Brands can better engage with consumers by understanding how Americans’ identities shape their views on social and political issues, and what they expect from brands like yours in engaging with these issues.

In a recent study, Collage Group asked Americans what three social and political issues are most important to them and found that Gen Z women are unique in wanting to see the reduction of sexism in society. 33% of Gen Z women feel reducing sexism is one of the most important social or political issues today, compared to just 10% of Millennial women, 7% of Gen X women, and 3% of Boomer women.

Gen Z women’s perceptions on the importance of reducing sexism is even more pronounced when it comes to their support of brands. Over half of Gen Z women will reward brands that support reducing sexism. And while older women tend to prioritize other social and political issues over sexism, many are still more likely to support brands that will confront sexism.

Across generations, women want brands to address sexism by paying them equally to men for the same jobs and offering training for employees so they can identify sexism and combat it. Gen Z women, however, stand out from older women by wanting brands to address sexism in other ways too. Half of Gen Z women also want brands to hire women to leadership positions. And over one in four want brands to make public statements about sexism and donate money to organizations that work to reduce sexism.

Contact us to find out how you can access the full America Now report with these insights and much more.

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America Now: Younger LGBTQ+ Americans Have High Expectations for Brands

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America Now: Younger LGBTQ+ Americans Have High Expectations for Brands

This research is part of a series that expands on our 2021 Roundtable Presentation, America Now. Read on to learn more about LGBTQ+ consumers, their perspective on gender and sexual identities, and what they expect from brands like yours.

Brands can better engage with consumers by understanding how they view different aspects of their own identity. Race, ethnicity, age, sexuality, and gender are just a few of the many elements of a person’s identity impacting how people see themselves and shaping their expectations for brands. LGBTQ+ Americans, especially those who are younger, tell us that their sexuality is becoming an increasingly important aspect of their identity. As a result, brands have to step up their inclusive marketing practices and oftentimes that means deftly engaging with social and political issues.

In a recent survey, Collage Group asked people to choose the most important aspect of their identity. Personality came out on top, followed by race, and country of origin. Just 8 percent of LGBTQ+ people responded that sexuality is the most important aspect of their identity. However, the importance of sexual identity is on the rise for this segment. Over 50 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents agree that their sexuality has become an increasingly important part of their identity in recent years. This is especially true for those between the ages of 18 and 40 years old. Younger LGBTQ+ are also significantly more likely to say their sexuality plays an increasingly important role in their identity than older LGBTQ+ Americans.

Importance of Sexual Identity for LGBTQ+ People

As sexuality becomes a more important element in how LGBTQ+ see themselves, brands must improve their efforts to accurately represent sexuality and gender in advertising — especially when targeting younger and multicultural LGBTQ+ consumers. Only 39 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their sexuality in advertising, significantly less than the approximately 53 percent of non-LGBTQ+ respondents who agree. Seeing their own sexual identity portrayed in advertising matters a lot to 42 percent of young LGBTQ+, significantly higher than older LGBTQ+ respondents. Similarly, for gender portrayals, over a third of all LGBTQ+ say it matters a lot to see advertisements with people of the same gender identity. Doing this comes with great benefits, as young LGBTQ+ are more likely to buy products and services from brands that challenge gender stereotypes in their advertisements.

LBTBQ+ Americans identify more with their sexuality

Beyond mere representation in advertising, LGBTQ+ consumers also desire to see brands engage in social and political issues impacting their community. About 40 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents agree that brands should focus on social and political issues even if they don’t directly relate to their products and services. 

Overall, most LGBTQ+ respondents prefer brands to get involved by educating consumers about LGBTQ+ rights and discrimination. However, young LGBTQ+ consumers would also like to see brands hire more LGBTQ+ in leadership positions and donate to LGBTQ+ causes.

America Now - LGBTQ and Identity - Collage Group

Contact us to find out how you can access the full America Now report with these insights and much more.

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Start 2022 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

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Start 2022 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

More than 200 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you? Here’s an overview of the new reports we’re releasing in Q1 2022 and beyond that you’re missing out on. Contact us today for access:

​Health and Wellness

Explore how consumer attitudes and behaviors toward health and wellness are evolving across diverse segments, including barriers to access, provider preferences, and more.

Small Business Owners in America

Learn how to connect authentically with America’s small business owners. This research gives you a look into the attitudes and behaviors of culturally diverse owners and includes action items to integrate marketing best practices for effective engagement.

LGBTQ+ Terminology​

Engage the LGBTQ+ community with a deeper understanding of changing expectations and trends in self-identification. Understand the meaning and preferences for terms like non-binary and intersex, and the nuances of personal pronouns. Dig deeper into the labels and/or identifiers each segment prefers and double-click by age, race/ethnicity, and gender when relevant.

CultureRate:Brand & Ad

Assess the Cultural Fluency of your brand and ads and explore how you stack up vs. your competitors. Members of our consumer research platforms have access to a dedicated report on a brand and ad.

New Launches in 2022

Also rolling out in 2022 are the launch of a new program and add-on module. More details on timing and content of these releases are coming soon.

Parents & Kids

In 2022, Collage Group will continue to expand our research into new territories. This includes a new research program exploring cultural variations in the attitudes and behaviors of parents and kids.

Medical Conditions

This add-on module for members who have a current demographic subscription will cover health care-related attitudes and behaviors of consumers with various medical diagnoses. The conditions and intersections covered will be released in February, but will likely include conditions such as chronic pain, depression, diabetes and more across race and ethnicity.  

Collage Group members have access to more than 10 years of consumer insights in over 300 studies with new data unveiled 3-to-4 times a month. As a member, you also get to the full reports recently released, including: Holidays & Occasions, Passion Points, Cultural Traits, Digital & Media and Category Essentials. Contact us to learn more about membership. 

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Transform Change into Opportunity: 2021 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable

Transform Change into Opportunity: 2021 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable

Explore how America’s diverse consumers have changed since 2020, specifically amidst unprecedented social and economic upheaval

The past 18 months have been a period of unprecedented change in America. The lingering COVID-19 pandemic coupled with social movements both embracing and resisting America’s increasing cultural diversity have created a set of new challenges for brands. These modern dilemmas include changing consumer expectations, deep polarization, and an urgent need to better connect with a diversifying America. Fortunately, these challenges are not insurmountable, and offer new opportunities to better connect with American consumers.

Collage Group is pleased to support more than 200 of America’s leading brands as they work to confront these challenges and transform change into opportunity. On November 3 at our 2021 Members-Only Roundtable, subscribers to our cultural intelligence platform(s) will learn how to leverage our cultural insights and tools to connect with the dynamic American consumer. The 2021 Roundtable will provide attendees with new research and engaging panel discussion focused on leveraging cultural insight to effectively navigate both today and tomorrow’s changing consumer landscape. Learn more in the agenda.

Attendees will learn:

    1. How consumers’ perspectives and behaviors related to COVID-19, racial justice, cultural diversity, and brand action have changed since 2020
    2. Which changes are likely to sustain into the future (and which might not)
    3. How to leverage cultural insights to connect across consumer segments
    4. Which brands and ads are on track to win with consumers and why

Presentations Include:

America Now: How We Have Changed Since 2020

We explore changes to diverse consumer attitudes at this key juncture in American history. Attendees will obtain exclusive insights into diverse consumer perspectives on climate change and polarizing issues, such as racism and the pandemic, compared to 2020. These learnings are key for 2022 planning.

CultureRate: Maximizing ROI from Targeted Multicultural Marketing

Our analysis of hundreds of brands and ads reveals insights into the drivers of brand Cultural Fluency and how to transcend the tradeoff between targeted and general market ads. 

Member Panel

Learn from America’s preeminent brand leaders in a discussion centered on actions internally and in marketing to stay ahead of the rapid changes underway in America. Hear how leaders from Pernod Ricard, McDonald’s and GSK are navigating the evolution of the modern American consumer.

Contact us today to learn more about how you can gain access to Collage Group’s 2021 Roundtable. You won’t want to miss this chance to learn where there is no going back and how you can ensure that your brand effectively marches into the future.

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Día de los Muertos: What Should My Brand Do?

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Día de los Muertos: What Should My Brand Do?

It’s not too late to activate! With over half of all Hispanic Americans (and two-thirds of Unacculturated) celebrating Día de los Muertos, brands will want to make their mark on this important holiday. Keep reading to learn what consumers expect from brands like yours this Day of the Dead.

Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a traditional Latin-American holiday celebrating the lives of loved ones who have passed on. The holiday’s roots are predominantly Mexican, and celebrations take place on November 1st and 2nd. While Day of the Dead occurs around Halloween and may share some similar imagery such as skulls, these two holidays differ greatly and should not be conflated with one another.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how Hispanic American consumers celebrate, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is Día de los Muertos?

Día de los Muertos is a two-day holiday honoring the deceased by celebrating the connection between life and death. What makes this occasion unique is its joyous—rather than mournful—tone. Celebrants gather together in remembrance of friends and family and have colorful parties and parades. They share happy or humorous memories. They make special meals and altars known as ofrendas (offerings) made up of their loved one’s favorite foods, items, pictures, and more. All of these traditions and symbolic gestures are meant to create a welcoming environment to attract the deceased’s spirits back to Earth on this annual occasion marked to keep their memory alive.

Traditions of Día de los Muertos

    • Ofrendas are offerings made to the dead and are built in the home or at the cemetery. They traditionally consist of paper cutouts (papel picado), marigold petals, pan de muerto pastry bread, and personal items, such as photographs, favorite foods, or other sentimental objects.
    • Skeletal imagery, such as the iconic La Catrina figure, show up in masks, puppets, colorful costumes, and face paintings.
    • Sugar skulls are a staple ornament during celebrations, often not meant to be eaten. Edible fare includes Mole Negro (pepper and chocolate sauce), Sopa Azteca (tortilla soup), and any foods favored by the deceased.

"(Spanish) We put up an altar with photographs of the loved ones who left and visit their graves, adorning them with flowers."

Unacculturated, Millenial, Man
Visiting gravesites and making alters (ofrendas) tops the list of ways Hispanic Americans, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, celebrate Día de los Muertos. Decorating and having special foods and drinks are also central to the holiday. The Bicultural segment over-indexes on a few other celebratory activities, like having parties, watching special movies, and listening to special music.

Key Consumer Insights

According to Collage Group’s 2021 Holidays & Occasions study, 52% of all Hispanic Americans, and 15% of the total American population, celebrate Day of the Dead. When we look by acculturation, we see it’s most widely celebrated by the Unacculturated (67%) and Bicultural (54%) segments, especially when compared to the Acculturated segment’s celebration rates which hover at 29%.

Día de los Muertos celebrations are both deeply personal and communal. So many brands may be wondering if they have permission to play.

From the celebrants’ perspective, brands generally have the green light. A plurality of Hispanic Americans (32%) say that all brands and companies should celebrate Day of the Dead in their marketing. Bicultural (33%) and Unacculturated (42%) Hispanic segments are especially comfortable with brands activating, whereas Acculturated are least likely to care.

Americans of other races/ethnicities tend to be positive, indifferent, or unfamiliar with the holiday altogether. The good news is there’s little to no opposition across the board. This means that activating won’t cause backlash from other segments.

Brands that want to activate around Day of the Dead can do so in a way that’s well-received within the Hispanic segment (and simultaneously educational to other less familiar segments) by showcasing the holiday’s meaning and importance. This is the number one topic Hispanic Americans say brands should focus on. This type of messaging will be especially resonant with Bicultural and Unacculturated groups that are strongly rooted to their culture and proud to express their heritage.

One brand that’s developed an excellent educational campaign on Día de los Muertos is McCormick in partnership with Poderistas. Part of the campaign includes a landing page with well-researched facts about the history and significance of the holiday.

To learn more about Día de los Muertos, we suggest the following sources:

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Change is Now: A Special Video Presentation

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Change is Now: A Special Video Presentation

For years, multicultural Americans have driven all the country’s population growth and have added trillions of dollars to the U.S. economy. These changes can be seen everywhere from food and media to healthcare and financial services, and so much more.

Cultural Fluency is the key to authentically connect with American consumers across race and ethnicity. But, engaging multicultural consumers is only the starting point. Cultures evolve through generational change and forces encompassing how we identify ourselves, including gender, sexuality, family structures and much more.

Navigating these changes can be challenging, even for the most seasoned and culturally aware brands. In fact, no single marketer can speak well to every segment without understanding the incredible transformation of the American consumer.

For more than a decade, Collage Group has helped 200+ iconic American brands engage, support, and champion the voices of America’s diverse consumers. Explore our new video series to learn how you too can unleash the power of culture to drive brand growth.

Fill out the form below to connect with our Sales team learn how you can get started on your path to Cultural Fluency.

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Media Consumption Across Gender

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Media Consumption Across Gender

Media is a major aspect of American life. Whether it’s social media, visual entertainment, or audio content, Americans spend a significant amount of time and attention in the media sphere. American’s focus on media presents an awesome opportunity for brands to connect with consumers. But to do this efficiently and effectively, brands need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Collage Group’s 2021 Media Study answers these questions. Our research reveals the specific platforms media users go to by gender, and what they’re using them for. This research also dives deep into content and platform drivers, including topics of interest and what consumers value in the personalities (e.g., influencers, podcast hosts, characters) they interact with across social, visual, and audio media.

Below are a several key insights we unearthed about media consumption by gender.

Fill out the form to view a sample from our research on attitudes and behaviors around Media Consumption by Gender.

Media Consumption by Gender

Social Media

Key Insight: Women visit social media sites to keep up with friends and family significantly more than men. However, women’s platform preferences vary by age.

About 9 in 10 women who use social media do so to keep in touch with family and friends. Overall, Facebook is the most popular platform for women staying in touch with people they know, but there are significant differences in platform preference between younger women (18-40) and older women (41-75). While 78% of older women primarily use Facebook as their main platform to stay connected with others, younger women use a more varied line up of platforms with their 2nd (Instagram) and 3rd (Snapchat) choices garnering substantially higher usage rates than older women’s respective preferences.

Women are More Likely to use Social Media than Men

​Visual Media

Key Insight: Compared to other consumers, younger women watch cable TV the least and stream video content the most.

While almost a third of older men and women still subscribe to cable and satellite TV, only about a quarter of younger women now pay for traditional TV services. While all groups are likely to use multiple visual streaming platforms to access the content their favorite content, younger women subscribe to more streaming platforms per person than both men their age and older consumers of any gender.

Younger Women are Using the Most Streaming Services

Audio Media

Key Insight: When choosing podcasts and radio shows, women prioritize relaxing content.

Over one third of women say they prefer podcasts that help them relax and forget about their worries. When it comes to choosing radio shows, even more women (43%) say that relaxation and providing a reprieve from worry is a primary consideration. In both cases, women are significantly more likely to use these criteria than men when selecting podcasts and radio shows.

Women Prioritize Podcast and Radio Shows that are Relaxing

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