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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media
Learn how Americans across races, ethnicities, and generations engage with emerging technology and media, including the metaverse, AR, VR, emerging social media platforms, and influencers.

November 21, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives, and today’s media landscape is always changing. Technologies like the metaverse, augmented reality, and virtual reality, along with emerging trends in social media like influencer marketing, have the potential to change people’s everyday lives. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand how people feel about these new technologies, their current usage rates, and if they are interested in using them in the future.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 study on emerging media provides insights across races, ethnicities, and generations on Americans’ behaviors around the metaverse, AR, VR, wearable smart devices, and NFTs. It also looks at newer and emerging social media platforms like TikTok and BeReal, and the power of influencer marketing.

Key Findings: The Metaverse

    • Millennials, alongside Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely to have tried the metaverse and to believe it is for people like them.
    • 1 in 2 Americans want to learn more about the metaverse and they want brands to play a role in that education. This desire is particularly strong for Black Americans.
    • Entertainment is the most popular reason Americans are interested in the metaverse today. This is particularly true for Black and Hispanic Americans.

Context:

Millennial and Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic Americans, are keen to try new technologies as soon as they come out. For Millennials, they have grown up in an era of new tech adoption and now have relatively more resources to buy in to the new tech. Multicultural Americans often turn to technology to explore the world and their own culture, as well as the culture of others.

Many Americans expect brands to be more than just the products and services they offer. Black Americans especially want brands to step up on a host of issues. The lack of clarity still surrounding the metaverse makes it an important opportunity for brands to play a guiding role.

Entertainment holds the key to consumers’ current use (video games, digital concerts, experiences, etc.) and future appeal. Since the metaverse is still in an experimental development phase, entertainment is the most compelling reason for consumers to give the tech a try.

 Action Steps:

    • Develop your metaverse marketing strategy with early adopters – Millennial and multicultural consumers- in mind.
    • During this early phase of the metaverse, take steps to educate consumers about this emerging technology. This can include specific information on what is and isn’t considered the metaverse, the promise the technology holds, and what consumers can expect from your brand on the metaverse.
    • When connecting with Americans on the metaverse, prioritize entertainment experiences. Sponsoring a concert or sports game on the metaverse will be a way to tap into the many Americans who want to use the platform for these experiences.

Key Findings: AR, VR, and Wearable Devices

    • Americans are still not using AR or VR technology at high rates, although many are likely using AR without knowing it.
    • Asian and Hispanic Americans are most likely to use wearable devices. Health and fitness is the leading reason to use these devices, particularly for Asian Americans.

Context:

Many Americans may be unaware that they have used AR in their everyday life because they don’t relate the experience they had with the label of AR. As a result, the concept of “augmented reality” doesn’t have as much traction with consumers as the specific uses and platforms do.

Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic and Asian, have a strong passion for fitness. They are more likely to enjoy working out and a wearable device such as an Apple Watch or Fitbit allows them to stay connected to their fitness goals. But, while many Americans use their wearable for fitness, they are also glancing at their wearable throughout the day.

 Action Steps:

    • Don’t get caught up in labeling the technology your brand offers. Many are enjoying the experience they are getting from this technology, even if they don’t use the terminology.
    • Make marketing “glanceable” so that emails and newsfeeds can work in the small screen of the wearable as well.

Key Findings: Social Media and Influencers

    • Short content is the star of social media platforms, and that is especially true for TikTok. Americans lean into short videos whether they are on TikTok for just a few minutes or way longer.
    • While most Americans think that marketing coming directly from brands is more trustworthy than an influencer, they also find influencers and content creators to be trustworthy sources of information.

Context:

TikTok is known for its “snackable” content, and the desire for Americans to see shorter videos aligns with why this platform became so popular to begin with. Shorter content gives viewers control over how much they watch. Even if they end up watching many videos, it still feels more manageable than committing to one, longer piece of content.

Consumers are savvy about influencer marketing, and partnerships with influencers who are transparent and trustworthy will feel more authentic to them. People don’t expect an absence of advertising on social media, but they do prefer it to be clearly identified as such.

 Action Steps:

    • When advertising on TikTok, keep it “snackable” and deliver videos less than one minute in length.
    • When partnering with a content creator on social media, select those that are authentic and trustworthy including offering transparency and honesty in their decisions and potentially going out of their way to combat misinformation.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know
Learn how American consumers across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and celebrate the winter holiday season.

October 24, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

Holidays and occasions are focal points for many Americans. These events afford people the opportunity to express their cultural traditions and individual preferences through decorations, food and beverage, entertainment, and activities.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Multicultural Holidays & Occasions presentation.

Holidays and occasions are also important for brands and organizations as they present an opportunity to deepen connection with consumer segments. Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Christmas and Kwanzaa are some of the key winter holidays brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention. Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this holiday by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and celebrate these holidays. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

Key Insight #1:

Half of Hispanic Americans celebrate Día de los Muertos, and Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are most comfortable with brands activating on this holiday.

Key Insight #2:

Most Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, and most Multicultural consumers incorporate non-traditional foods into their Thanksgiving celebrations.

Key Insight #3:

 Hispanic and Asian American segments are more likely to say their Christmas celebrations go beyond “typical” American traditions.

Key Insight #4:

Kwanzaa is a popular holiday, celebrated by many Black Americans.

Key Insight #5:

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are popular for Black and Asian Americans as a kick-off to holiday shopping.

What can my brand do to activate on a winter holiday?

    • Focus on authenticity, particularly if you are activating on a holiday that is celebrated by a specific racial or ethnic segment like Dia de los Muertos and Kwanzaa. Depending on your brand, this can include a simple celebratory message on social media pages, helping to educate the broader community about the holiday, or partnering with in-segment content creators to tell their own personal stories related to the holiday.
    • Highlight what is non-traditional about traditional American holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas are celebrated across racial and ethnic segments, but many Multicultural Americans have their own traditions based on their heritage and upbringing. Showing the range of how Americans celebrate will appeal to many Americans, particularly those who are Multicultural, and who have different ways of celebrating.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points

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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Black American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Black Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Powerful Memories Are Made in the Kitchen

Black Americans feel at home cooking and baking in their kitchens.

Context:

Many Black Americans grew up in the kitchen learning how to cook from older family members. They see preparing a meal as time to spend with family, create memories, and express love and care for others through food.

Action Step:

Portray cooking and baking as a full family (plus friends) activity and emphasize the real motivator for Black Americans’ enjoyment making food at home: relationships.

Key Finding #2: Black Travelers Welcome Discomfort

Black Americans are more likely than others to travel to get out of their comfort zone, but they prefer to do so domestically in the U.S.

Context:

Historically, prejudice followed Black Americans along with them on trips. But now, the Greenbook has evolved into influencers and Black consumers’ Group Traits of Determined, Real, Believing, and Forward-thinking merge to make this segment uniquely optimistic and adventurous travelers.

Action Step:

Boost Black Americans’ excitement for U.S. locations and weave local interests into your travel messaging.

Key Finding #3: Black Athletes Are Leaders In and Out of Their Sport

Black Americans are dedicated sports fans who follow their favorite teams, as well as the careers of specific athletes.

Context:

Black athletes have served as American heroes for Black sports fans (and all sports fans) for decades. As a result of that earned trust and influence, Black athletes have often refused to “stick to sports” and have weighed in on important social and politics issues that matter to the Black community. Since 2020, this trend has only ramped up with athletes like Lebron James, Serena Williams, Colin Kaepernick, Maya Moore, and others speaking up for equality.

Action Step:

Recognize the influence and social/political clout of Black athletes and partner with them on marketing efforts.

Key Finding #4: Fashion is a Vehicle for Black Self-Expression

Black Americans are uniquely passionate about fashion. They consider themselves trendsetters and enjoy expressing their personalities with style.

Context:

Self expression is an essential element of Black Americans’ lives. In fact, they are more likely to see themselves as unique, unabashed, and authentic than others. For many Black Americans, individuality is something to be celebrated across all aspects of life.

Action Step:

When you’re engaging Black consumers, de-emphasize uniformity and function in favor of fashion’s fun and uncommon side.

Key Finding #5: Black Americans Embrace the “Gamer” Identity

Black Americans love to play video games and even are self-proclaimed “gamers.”

Context:

For Black Americans, video games are a vehicle for some of the things they value most: connecting with their friends and family, self-expression, and personal achievement.

Action Step:

Resist the urge to see video games as just a “game.” Instead, emphasize the bigger motivators for why Black Americans love them: social connection, individuality, and skill-building.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Black Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
Analyst

Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Talking About ‘Inflation’ May Backfire for Brands

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Talking About 'Inflation' May Backfire for Brands

Hispanic, Black, and Asian Americans are also adopting different purchasing strategies.

August 17, 2022
Quintin Simmons – Public Relations & Communications Manager

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It’s no surprise that in Collage Group’s recent consumer survey on the economy, a whopping 93% of respondents said they have noticed that items they ordinarily purchase are now more expensive, and 78% said they are “a little” to “very worried” about their current financial situation.

Fill out the form below to watch the replay and download the presentation for key insights.

Data from the analysis, “Guard Against Recession with Cultural Insights,” also reveals that brands should avoid certain language about the economic outlook when addressing consumers, including using terms like ‘the economy,’ ‘recession,’ and ‘inflation,’ as these phrases may trigger unexpected responses from consumers.

“These words polarize buyers, and once they hear them, there’s a tendency to absorb the message as loaded or too political,” explained David Evans, chief insights officer at Collage Group. “I recommend brands avoid playing into the economic anxiety.”

Brands need to concentrate on what they can control, he says. “They need to focus on solving consumers’ real problems.”

Evans instructs brands to connect around personal finance issues and look to address everyday problems such as paying down debt and managing escalating costs.

“So, it is imperative for brands to refraining from giving too much attention to the economic-narrative headline, and more important to explain how their products and services would be helpful,” Evans continued.

To that point, another 93% of consumers want brands to do something to help them. At the top of the list: offer discounts, cut prices, and provide lower cost versions or packaging.   

Additionally, it is equally critical for brands to recognize that consumers are navigating the waters differently, especially across racial and ethnic segments.

Hispanic Americans are worried and changing behavior: Collage found that 35% of Hispanic Americans say they are “very worried” now, much higher than other groups. As a result, they have already begun adjusting their purchasing across virtually every category, including purchasing more generic or store brands and shopping more frequently at discount stores.

Black Americans are far less concerned than other segments: Remarkably, Black Americans are far less worried about what’s to come, and in fact are holding steady on purchasing behaviors. Evans attributes this poise to Black Americans’ tenacity over time, citing the segment’s higher levels of optimism and courageousness, two of a variety of cultural traits which Collage Group tracks across all demographics.

Asian American are adopting a wait and see approach: Asian Americans are a bit in the middle of the spectrum. They are not yet worried, according to the study. However, Asians said they are planning to adjust spending in the future in order to be safe.

“Every segment is feeling the pinch, and brands need to respond with empathy and show they are prepared to do something,” said Jack Mackinnon, senior director at Collage Group and the author of the study.

“At the same time, it is essential for brands to avoid attempting to adopt a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to the multicultural segment,” he added. “Brands also need to recognize the variety of responses consumers are having to inflation.”

Top action steps brands should consider:

    1. Avoid political anxieties by steering clear of the headline economic narrative: Our highly polarized national media causes many to view the economy through their own political lens. Brands must be mindful of playing into this polarizing dynamic.
    2. Embrace the realities of consumers’ real financial challenges: Show empathy about what’s happening to consumers now, especially with respect to managing credit, delaying purchases, shopping and driving habits.
    3. Explaining cost savings opportunities: Tell consumers how products and services can save them money.
    4. Emphasizing steadiness/predictability: Seize those consumers who have strong brand loyalty. Position your brand as steady and willing to provide what’s needed. 
    5. Being willing to sacrifice: Those brands in particular that have generated record profits should reward their devoted consumers by supplying coupons, by discounting prices, and by offering layaway or delayed payment options.

Contact us to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Quintin Simmons

Quintin Simmons
Public Relations & Communications Manager

Quintin Simmons is Public Relations & Communications manager at Collage Group. He has over two decades of journalism and communications experience, having written and edited for a variety of publications, and servicing as media rep for a number of national outlets. Quintin, a communications and media relations expert, is always looking to connect and engage with writers and reporters.

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In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

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In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

As prices for everyday items continue to soar, a number of Americans find themselves priced out of buying certain products, and others are able to afford but refuse to pay the steeper costs.

August 1, 2022
Quintin Simmons – Public Relations & Communications Manager

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When it comes to grocery shopping the choice to not buy isn’t a realistic option. Inflation has taken a noticeable toll on the cost of goods of all kinds, from home purchases to vehicle buys. The grocery store is no exception.

Fill out the form for more details in an excerpt of our Category Essential on Food.

To contend with higher grocery bills, a segment of shoppers have changed their shopping habits. Overall, most shoppers reported that they have decided to select cheaper brands, or they have opted to purchase fewer items.

Across racial and ethnicity lines, the reaction to grocery price hikes has been largely similar. Hispanic, Black, and Asian American consumers were more likely to report changing where they shop. These three groups also said they have stopped or have reduced making bulk food purchases.

All three segments – plus White American shoppers – said that affordability is indeed a factor when they decide which foods to buy. Of the White Americans polled, 78% answered that they often or always make a special effort to buy foods that are affordable. Black shoppers also see affordability as an important factor, as 73% responded in kind. Close behind them were Asians at 72%. 

Americans Food Choices

When asked what matters most when choosing a store for grocery shopping, 57% of all races responded, “low prices.” Moreover, collectively 42% of Hispanic, Black, Asians, and Whites said they recently decided to purchase cheaper items or generic brands due to the higher grocery costs. Some have bought less groceries and a portion have decided to shop for food elsewhere.

As prices and food bills continue to mount, buyers of all backgrounds have taken notice, and many are making adjustments.

Fill out the form below to learn more about how you can access the full report.

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Quintin Simmons

Quintin Simmons
Public Relations & Communications Manager

Quintin Simmons is Public Relations & Communications manager at Collage Group. He has over two decades of journalism and communications experience, having written and edited for a variety of publications, and servicing as media rep for a number of national outlets. Quintin, a communications and media relations expert, is always looking to connect and engage with writers and reporters.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Engage Small Business Owners in America

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Engage Small Business Owners in America
Small businesses drive the American economy and their owners reflect the diverse cultures and perspectives of Americans. Read on for more information about how to connect with small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

April 15, 2022
Jack Mackinnon – Director, Product and Content

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Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 6 million of those companies have at least one paid employee. At the helm of all that economic heft is an owner who tends to be highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions of the business. As a result, small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owners’ identity (collective and by sub-segment), future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study and download the deck for the full picture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Engage Small Business Owners in America presentation.

Key Insight #1: Identity

Small business owners, especially Hispanic, Black, and Asian American small business owners, describe themselves as being innovative, driven, and community-oriented. There is also a sense of shared culture among minority small business owners and a strong connection between Black small business owners and the communities where their businesses operate.

Implication:

Small Business Owners see themselves as innovative, driven, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2: Outlook

Small business owners are confident that their business prospects are going to continue to improve over the next year. Hispanic and Black owners are especially optimistic about how their businesses are performing compared to last year and will perform into the next.

Implication:

Harness the positivity! Even though this hasn’t been an easy year, recognize Multicultural Small Business Owners’ positive sentiment and match it in your communications.

Key Insight #3: Operations

Small Business Owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to small business owners, themselves. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4: Support and Partnerships

Small Business Owners, especially multicultural owners, are looking for specific expertise in the areas of marketing, networking, and financing.

Implication:

Provide Small Business Owners assistance in marketing, networking, and finance via digital tools.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jack McKinnon

Jack Mackinnon
Director, Product and Content

Jack Mackinnon is a new addition to the Collage Group syndicated research team. He brings consumer insight expertise across Multicultural, Generations, and LGBTQ+ segments.

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Start 2022 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

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Start 2022 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

More than 200 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you? Here’s an overview of the new reports we’re releasing in Q1 2022 and beyond that you’re missing out on. Contact us today for access:

​Health and Wellness

Explore how consumer attitudes and behaviors toward health and wellness are evolving across diverse segments, including barriers to access, provider preferences, and more.

Small Business Owners in America

Learn how to connect authentically with America’s small business owners. This research gives you a look into the attitudes and behaviors of culturally diverse owners and includes action items to integrate marketing best practices for effective engagement.

LGBTQ+ Terminology​

Engage the LGBTQ+ community with a deeper understanding of changing expectations and trends in self-identification. Understand the meaning and preferences for terms like non-binary and intersex, and the nuances of personal pronouns. Dig deeper into the labels and/or identifiers each segment prefers and double-click by age, race/ethnicity, and gender when relevant.

CultureRate:Brand & Ad

Assess the Cultural Fluency of your brand and ads and explore how you stack up vs. your competitors. Members of our consumer research platforms have access to a dedicated report on a brand and ad.

New Launches in 2022

Also rolling out in 2022 are the launch of a new program and add-on module. More details on timing and content of these releases are coming soon.

Parents & Kids

In 2022, Collage Group will continue to expand our research into new territories. This includes a new research program exploring cultural variations in the attitudes and behaviors of parents and kids.

Medical Conditions

This add-on module for members who have a current demographic subscription will cover health care-related attitudes and behaviors of consumers with various medical diagnoses. The conditions and intersections covered will be released in February, but will likely include conditions such as chronic pain, depression, diabetes and more across race and ethnicity.  

Collage Group members have access to more than 10 years of consumer insights in over 300 studies with new data unveiled 3-to-4 times a month. As a member, you also get to the full reports recently released, including: Holidays & Occasions, Passion Points, Cultural Traits, Digital & Media and Category Essentials. Contact us to learn more about membership. 

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Most Americans (58%) Want Businesses to Engage in Social and Political Issues

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Most Americans (58%) Want Businesses to Engage in Social and Political Issues

One in Four Gen Z Consumers Will Stop Buying from Brands That Do Not Take a Stance on an Important Issue

November 10th, 2021
Mollie Turner – Senior Director of Marketing

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American consumers are experiencing a second year of unprecedented change, giving 2020 solid competition for an emerging set of challenges for U.S. businesses. Political polarization, COVID-19, race relations, immigration, LGBTQ+ rights and climate change have been top of mind for consumers this year–leading to shifts in consumer expectations of businesses.

“Most Americans want brands to engage in social and political issues,” says David Wellisch, Collage Group CEO and Co-Founder. “The numbers are even more striking when we look by specific issues. For example, 85% of Americans want brands to play a role in ending the COVID-19 pandemic and alleviating its impact. And, then there’s the stick—we see younger Americans, bicultural Hispanics, and Black Americans are much more willing to penalize brands for non-action on issues they see as important.”

These are just a few of the many datapoints on shifts in American consumer behaviors since 2020 available in Collage Group’s America Now: How We Have Changed Since 2020 report. Research led by Chief Insights Officer David Evans, Senior Director of Product & Content Bryan Miller, PhD, and Director of Product & Content Jack Mackinnon, unveils changes to diverse consumer attitudes at a key juncture in American history. The results come from a survey fielded in September 2021 of 3,785 Americans, representing Americans across race, ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender.

Fill out the form to view a recording and download a sample from our research presentation, Multicultural America Now.

Multicultural America Now

Key insights illuminated in the research include:

  1. Most Americans (58%) Want Brands to Engage in Social and Political Issues
      • Stopping COVID-19, improving race relations and halting climate change are the top three social and political issues consumers want brands to support.
      • The majority (85%) of Americans want brands to play a role in ending the COVID-19 pandemic and alleviating its impact.
      • The majority (59%) of Americans believe corporations bear the responsibility of fighting climate change – not individuals.
      • The majority (55%) of consumers across all generations acknowledge the urgency of taking action on climate change.
  2. Race and Ethnicity is the #1 Way Multicultural Americans Self-Identify, Regardless of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, or Sexuality­
      • Race and Hispanic ethnicity are the most common self-descriptors for multicultural Americans, ranking higher than personality, age/life stage, country of origin, being American, sexuality, gender and more.
      • Multicultural Americans report an increased interest in buying from brands that support people of their racial and ethnic background—an ~11% increase on average in 2021 comes on top of a 2020 baseline of ~52% of consumers.
  3. Empathetic Gen Z Support Black and LGBTQ+ Americans Much More Than Older Generations (+15%)
      • The majority of Gen Z consumers wants brands to support women (56%) and Black Americans (55%).
      • Inaction is risky for brands with younger consumers, as 26% of Gen Z would stop using or buying a brand if it did not take a stance on an important issue.
  4. COVID-19 Worries Remain for Two-Thirds of Americans, and Their Concern Is Tied Primarily to Economic Factors (64%)
      • Nearly two-thirds of Americans are still concerned about COVID-19, with Asian Americans feeling the most concern at 72%, up 4% since 2020.
      • Most Americans (64%) are concerned they may not have enough money to keep up with monthly expenses; Hispanic Americans are the most concerned with 3 in 4 (74%) citing the concern.
  5. Many Multicultural Americans Have Reprioritized What Matters Most to Them vs. One Year Ago
      • Multicultural Americans say being happy and healthy (41%), saving money (33%) and supporting family and community (27%) are now their top priorities.
      • The majority (54%) of Hispanic Americans say being healthy and happy is much more important to them today than it was one year ago.

“Engaging authentically with an increasingly diverse America can be hard, and missteps are easy,” says David Wellisch. “But our research illustrates that not engaging is not an option, especially during challenging times. This is consumer expectation.”

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Mollie Turner

Mollie Turner
Senior Director of Marketing

Mollie Turner is the Senior Director of Marketing at Collage Group where she leads growth, engagement and brand initiatives. She is a seasoned marketing and communications executive, with 20 years of experience spanning B2B, non-profit and agency roles across various industries.

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Close 2021 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

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Close 2021 Strong with New Diverse Consumer Insights

More than 200 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you? Here’s a sampling of our latest reports that you’re missing out on. Contact us today for access:

America Now

Transform change into opportunity. This deep dive report explores changes to diverse consumer attitudes at a key transformational moment. Learn where there is no going back and build strategy for the future.

​Health and Wellness

Explore how consumer attitudes and behaviors toward health and wellness are evolving across diverse segments, from conceptions and wellbeing, barriers to access, provider preferences, and more.

Digital Media Consumption

Discover how Americans are consuming media / social media content and the evolution across consumer segments. These reports explore use of streaming services, non-English languages, and much more. Learn more in samples of our Digital & Media reports on race/ethnicity, generation and sexuality.

CultureRate:Brand & Ad

Assess the Cultural Fluency of your brand and ads and explore how you stack up vs. your competitors. Members of our consumer research platforms have access to a dedicated report on a brand or ad, which includes recommendations for a path forward to improve the rankings.

Category Essentials

Access semi-annual reports to keep up with America’s diverse consumers across race/ethnicity, age, sexuality and gender. These reports evaluate consumer attitudes and behaviors across 12 different consumer goods industries. New reports will be released that dig deeper into apparel and travel and hospitality.

Collage Group members have access to more than 10 years of consumer insights in over 300 studies with new data unveiled 3-to-4 times a month. As a member, you also get to the full reports recently released, including: Holidays & Occasions, Passion Points, and Cultural Traits. Contact us to learn more about membership. 

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There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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