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Top Ten Brands on Shared Values for 2020

Top Ten Brands on Shared Values for 2020

Read on to find out which brands consumers identify as sharing their values - and the practices they used to get there.

In a time where people are exposed to more advertising and have more options than ever before, it’s critical for brands to create authentic connections to keep consumers coming back. One way to do this is to demonstrate you care about the things your consumers care about. After all, we know that many consumers across racial and ethnic segments will reward brands that share their values and punish those that defy them.

Collage Group’s brand rating tool, BrandRate, provides insight on how well brands are signaling shared values with consumers.

 The tool, which is designed to assess cultural fluency (i.e., number of segments the brand resonates with), measures shared values by asking brand-aware consumers to agree or disagree with the statement “This brand cares about the things that are important to me.” Here we see the top ten brands among more than 400 in our database that consumers aged 18-39 most often identify as sharing their values.

But we know that America is diverse and different segments have different values that line up with different brands.

So we took a deeper look at the data to understand which brands are connecting on shared values across racial and ethnic segments and which are connecting on shared values with specific segments. The top 10 lists for each racial and ethnic group are below.

First thing to note, both Lysol and Clorox rank highly across segments.

In the era of COVID-19, when consumers are placing higher value on cleanliness and staying healthy than ever before, it’s not surprising to see these brands pop. Lysol and Clorox have proven they value cleanliness and health by having select products approved by the EPA to successfully kill the COVID-19 virus. And they’ve continued to show their commitment to health and safety by making generous donations to various organizations (CDC, NEA and the American Red Cross) fighting against COVID-19 and helping to get the country back up and running.

Second thing to consider, outside of a handful of brands appearing across lists, we also see significant variation by segment.

For example, the top 10 list for shared values for the Black segment includes Chick-Fil-A, Nike, and Fenty. Nike’s a no-brainer given their extensive and very public support for racial equality. And Chick-Fil-A’s high ranking is probably tied to its association with Christianity and Christian values—something the highly religious Black segment likely resonates with.

Fenty Beauty, a brand founded by music superstar Rihanna in 2017, is a relative newcomer that’s been able to connect with Black consumers through its commitment to diversity and inclusion. Fenty has gone that extra step and baked these values into the products it sells. For example, it offers 50 shades of foundation, a substantial improvement over many other brands that treat dark skin as a monolith. The brand also features models of varying genders in their advertising. And it donates 100% of proceeds from select products to the Clara Lionel Foundation, which provides extensive support to marginalized communities around the world.

Our findings illustrate that both rising and established brands can successfully communicate to consumers that they share their values. And you can too.

In addition to shared values, our proprietary B-CFQ (Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient) metric also measures Brand Fit, Brand Relevance, Brand Trust, Brand Advocacy, and Brand Memories. Fill out the form below to learn more about our category-specific BrandRate studies and how you can use them to increase your brand’s cultural fluency. 

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While Love of Family Is Universal, Representation Must Be Nuanced

While Love of Family Is Universal, Representation Must Be Nuanced

Family is a commonly shared value across diverse segments, but that doesn’t mean it’s one-size-fits-all. Read on to understand the nuances within multicultural family life for authentic representation and effective connection on the path towards Cultural Fluency.

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Human beings are social by nature – this is universally true. No matter our background, we all crave connection. We value family and anchor our lives to our loved ones.

Our research confirms that family matters to pretty much everyone, but our data also reveals: how is family experienced and expressed differently across cultural backgrounds?

These subtleties aren’t just food for thought – getting them right matters. Multicultural Americans, especially Black and Unacculturated Hispanic consumers, say it matters a lot to them that advertisements represent families that look like theirs. And a fifth of Americans, especially Black consumers, want to see more non-traditional family structures represented.

How should brands activate on the shared value of family connection?

Brands must understand nuances in multicultural family dynamics to accurately represent and connect with these powerful segments. In doing so, you’re not only pleasing consumers – you’re taking a strategic approach to be Culturally Fluent.

Authentic representation of one segment doesn’t come at the cost of resonance with other segments. In fact, genuine cultural signals are what resonates. Even if the cues aren’t personally relatable, the recognition of authenticity is priceless. An accurate portrayal of one segment is a way to position your brand as trustworthy and respected by all consumers.

Collage Group’s 2020 research initiatives dive deep into family values, attitudes, and behaviors to distinguish variations across segments and uncover authentic details. Keep reading for high-level segment takeaways and download the deck for more, including family profiles by segment.

1. Which consumers value the role of song, music and dance in the family?

About a third of Hispanic and Black Americans value the role of song, music, and dance in the family. These activities are ways to bond with one another and are also likely to be present at family gatherings.

For instance, Oreo acknowledges the lively nature of Hispanic American families with a relevant portrayal of the importance of song and dance in family life. Their recent spot features Latin pop singer Becky G video-chatting her brother. They connect over a shared love of music – and Oreos – as they sing and dance over the phone with her extended family in the background.

Our AdRate research shows that this ad successfully represents the Hispanic experience of the universal Group Trait of Family, while simultaneously resonating across segments (including White viewers). The music-and-dance-filled ad did exceptionally well with the Hispanic segment, with an A-CFQ score of 81 (+6 points above the resonance threshold of 75), as well as the Black segment (A-CFQ score of 74). But the power of authentically representing the Hispanic family was appreciated by other segments, too, with A-CFQ scores of 73 for the Asian segment and 72 for the White segment. Even though the ad was in Spanish, consumers recognize and appreciate the cultural cues of singing and dancing as relevant to Hispanic families.

2. How do Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian American consumers value family?

Both segments like to make their families proud and live in accordance with familial expectations. They also tend to be especially loyal to their families and prize their input when making decisions.

This spot by Chase leans into Asian Americans’ desire to please their elders. A son is learning to make noodles from scratch, and along the way seeks guidance from his mother and approval from his grandmother.

3. How often do multicultural consumers spend time with family?

Multicultural Americans tend to have more relatives and be closer to distant relatives than White Americans. Moreover, Hispanic and Black segments spend more time with their relatives and are more likely to build close relationships with them than White Americans are.

Connect across segments through this common value and illustrate how your brand can strengthen family ties. For instance, a recent Christmas spot by Etsy shows a Black family gathered for the holiday. The son’s new boyfriend joins the celebration, but feels intimidated by all the relatives, until they warmly “welcome him to the family” with a personalized gift.

For more insights on the study, download an excerpt of the sample above. Learn more about membership, custom research and more by filling out the form below. 

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Race, Ethnicity is the Most Important Part of Identity for Multicultural Consumers

Race, Ethnicity is the Most Important Part of Identity for Multicultural Consumers
Understanding consumer identity is key to building authentic connections. Read on for actionable insights.
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Replay our webinar featuring these findings, “New Insights for Authentic Multicultural American Connections.”

Consumers are expecting more of brands as cultural transformation accelerates in the U.S., with multicultural consumers now representing more than 100 percent of population growth.

As their expectations increase, understanding how consumers define themselves is key to building authentic connections. In our recent research, we found that nearly 3 in 4 multicultural consumers say race and ethnicity is an important part of their identity, outweighing all other factors including personality, being American, gender and more. For Hispanics, this is especially high for unacculturated consumers.

Digging deeper into consumer identity, we asked consumers to select the three aspects they would most likely use to describe themselves.

Race and/or heritage ranks at the top of the list for most multicultural consumers, with the exception of acculturated Hispanics (ranked at 4). Personality and being American are also key factors for identity across all consumer segments.

Given the importance of consumer identity through the lens of race and ethnicity, opportunities are rapidly increasing for brands to deepen cultural connections.

We asked consumers about the actions brands would need to take for them to go out of their way to buy from that brand or company. The top answer across all multicultural consumers: they are most willing to reward brands that support people of their own race or ethnicity. 

What are brands to do to take action on these insights? Multicultural consumers told us a variety of things. Topping the list: more transparent business practices, diverse representation in advertising, diverse stories in ads and authentic stories of diverse people in ads. 

At Collage Group, we have built a framework to help brands understand your consumers, identify how they connect and relate to your brand, and take the steps needed to improve your brand and ad performance. We call this our Cultural Fluency Roadmap. Contact us to get started.

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Measuring The Cultural Fluency of Healthcare Brands

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Healthcare Brands

Our recent BrandRate study tested the cultural resonance of 18 healthcare brands.

One of our key findings from this study is that many health insurance companies fail to resonate with multiple cultural segments. In fact, of the six health insurance brands we tested, five did not resonate with any of the four core segments (Hispanic, Black, Asian, and non-Hispanic White).

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This struggle to resonate is likely because people don’t necessarily feel a personal connection to health insurance brands the way they do with other categories such as food. In addition, since BrandRate studies survey the New Wave of consumers (ages 18-39), these survey respondents are young and have less experience with health insurance. Many of them, if they are under the age of 26, may still be on their parents’ plan. Or these young consumers may not have health insurance at all because they feel healthy and invincible. They haven’t had an opportunity to build trust and relationships with providers over time. Health insurance brands aren’t alone here. In previous BrandRate research in the Telecom and financial services spaces we also saw a struggle to resonate. This doesn’t mean it’s impossible to capture people, but rather that you need to be thoughtful and strategic about how you move forward.

So how can healthcare brands build connections and increase resonance with New Wavers across cultural segments?

The best place to start is looking at your B-CFQ component scores to see where the opportunities to improve are easiest to achieve. Take, for example, Alka-Seltzer. Alka-Seltzer received a cultural reach score of 1.

 As you can see in the chart below, White and acculturated Hispanic consumers ranked Alka-Seltzer around average for most of the components, while Black and Asian consumers rated the brand below average for most of the six components.

On the other hand, bicultural and unacculturated Hispanic consumers rated Alka-Seltzer strongly above average across the board. Bayer, which owns Alka-Seltzer, has been focused on marketing Alka-Seltzer in Latin American countries since at least the 1980s. In the late 1990s, Bayer partnered with a Hispanic advertising agency to develop a culturally specific campaign, in the Spanish language, which included TV, radio, and print ads to demonstrate the relevance and fit of the brand. Clearly this strategy has worked! Alka-Seltzer has gained a sort of cult following among Hispanic families as a cure for all types of ailments.  People share memes in Spanish showing, for example, a doctor prescribing a patient who is sick in bed to drink a soda with Alka-Seltzer.

One component where Alka-Seltzer did really well – around or above average with five out of the six segments – is strong brand trust. Even if it’s not a consumer’s preferred brand, or they don’t have great memories associated with it, they still trust that it’s a reliable product that will do its job if they need it. These high scores are good news for the brand, which can use these positives to offset some of the areas where they performed less well, such as brand values or willingness to be a brand advocate. These findings reveal opportunities and some next steps to further connect the brand with these segments: focus on what they value and what they need from insurance policies in the messaging, partner with relevant influencers to increase trust and brand-buzz, and then give them a reason to talk about the brand.

 

Are you interested in seeing this study applied to your brand? Fill out the form below to speak with a Collage Group representative.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of USA Today’s “National Brand Statement” on Black Lives Matter.

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of USA Today’s “National Brand Statement” on Black Lives Matter.
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In our latest round of ad testing using AdRate, we focused on USA Today’s “National Brand Statement” on Black Lives Matter.

In this video, USA Today takes a clear stance on the issue of racial injustice. The plain black screen starts out with just one name – George Floyd. In a matter of seconds, the screen populates with names of other Black Americans that have unjustly lost their lives, and in the background, voices of protesters grow increasingly loud. The spot concludes with an explicit message: “Silence is not an option.”

Screenshot of USA Today's Response to Black Lives Matter

USA Today’s poignant ad did not cross the resonance threshold with everyone, but it was a clear winner for the Black segment. It was the highest performing media/telecom ad for Black consumers, with an A-CFQ score of 80. This ad joins a very small elite group of ads that can provoke that level of connection (Head & Shoulders “Royal Oils: BET Black History Month” and Coca-Cola “History Shakers”).

The top performing feature of this ad was the message. And while it’s sobering, about half of all respondents appreciate the message and say it was their favorite feature of the ad. On top of that, 72% of all viewers, and 81% of Black viewers, agree that it’s an important message. This was higher than any other ad in the study. Black respondents shared that they love the solidarity from USA Today supporting Black Lives Matter.

USA Today’s ad is unique in evoking an array of emotions. While many ads tend to cluster around one emotion, here the data is more fragmented across emotions, which would be expected given the sensitivity around the topic. Even still, feeling proud is the highest reported emotion, and this is especially true among Black viewers at 31%.

USA Today not only took a definitive stance on this issue – they went all in. They used explicit language to name and remember the Black Americans whose lives have been taken unjustly. They expressly referenced Black Lives Matter. And they made a clear assertion that staying silent on the issue is harmful. This course of action was powerful in both supporting and connecting with Black Americans.

To learn more about BrandRate, Cultural Fluency or Ad Testing, fill out the form below.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Ads: Home Care

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Ads: Home Care
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In this AdRate study, we had the opportunity to test a recent ad by Lysol, “Questions Need Answers,” released in July 2020.

Amidst these uncertain times, Lysol’s ad aims to answer people’s common questions about how and where they can use Lysol disinfecting products.

The ad creatively displays the questions as if someone typed them into an internet search engine and shows people all the unlikely places they can use Lysol – including game controllers, packages, couches, and laptops. And it was a hit! This was one of the highest-performing home care ads of the set, resonating with all four consumer segments – Hispanic, Black, Asian, and White – with an A-CFQ score of 75 or higher for each group. And this ad ranked within the top two for each segment.

The top performing features of this ad were the message and visuals. And a whopping 80% of consumers agreed that this ad has an important message – higher than any other home care ad tested. This ad does a great job of capturing people’s attention in a relatable way – typing questions into a search bar – even ones that may seem a little outlandish! And viewers seem to like the format of learning about the product this way.

Lysol’s ad clearly and effectively communicated the value of their products, mitigating viewer confusion. The ad’s confident tone resulted in high rates of positive emotions across segments, like happiness, excitement, and pride.

Interested in seeing this study applied to your business?  We offer all Collage Group members a free detailed mini-report on one ad and one brand for each membership subscription (Latinum and GenYZ). Members may obtain more reports on any ad or brand at an additional cost.

For membership inquiries, demos, or questions, please fill out the contact form below. 

 

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Nonalcoholic Beverages: Jarritos

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Nonalcoholic Beverages: Jarritos
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In this BrandRate study for non-alcoholic beverage brands, we had the opportunity to test Mexican soda brand, Jarritos, with multicultural consumers.

You might expect Jarritos to do well with Hispanic New Wave consumers – and you’d be right – but you might be surprised to know that the brand achieved a cultural reach score of 2, being culturally resonant with the Asian New Wave segment as well.

You may be wondering why Jarritos performed so well with these two groups. On the slide below, you see the percent of each segment that agrees with each of the six components of our Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ). We see trends both across segment lines (columns) and across specific components (rows).

When you look at the different components, you’ll notice that pretty much across the board, Hispanic Acculturation segments score Jarritos very highly. Asian consumers share much of this sentiment, but aren’t as fanatic when it comes to perceiving Jarritos as a brand which shares their values. So there’s still room to improve, but Asian consumers – who are often adventurous and seek out authentic options for food and drink – clearly have strong affinity for this Hispanic heritage brand.

For Black and white New Wave consumers, though, Jarritos falls behind. With one exception – the Black segment sees Jarritos as a brand they can advocate for, potentially for its cultural significance, even if it’s not one they relate to personally. This sentiment is something Jarritos can leverage in future campaigns seeking to broaden its consumer base.

Collage Group members get access to a free, detailed report on one ad and one brand per year. Members may also obtain more reports on ads at an additional cost. Fill out the form below to learn more about the benefits of membership, cultural fluency, brand testing and more.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Media, Telecom, and Sports Leagues

Cultural Fluency Product Spotlight: Apple Music
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Our recent BrandRate study tested the cultural resonance of 47 media and telecom brands and sports leagues.

One of our key findings from this study is that many media brands fail to resonate with multiple cultural segments. This is likely due to the highly saturated media space (there are 1,000s of channels to choose from) and the fact that many channels are targeted to specific segments and don’t aim for total market appeal. Nevertheless, there were a few brands that did resonate widely like the streaming music service Apple Music. This brand did very well across Multicultural segments.

Why does Apple Music perform so well with Multicultural consumers?

One reason Apple music performs so well with multicultural consumers is because of high brand trust. When you look at the different components broken down on the chart below, you’ll notice that all segments rank Apple Music around or above average on trust. This makes sense: Apple is a well-regarded brand with huge name recognition and is known as a pioneer in the digital music industry. When Apple launched the Apple Music service in 2015, they already had a reputation for quality music products from iPod and iTunes – Apple Music was the next logical product. And it looks like they’ve been able to maintain and extend their users’ trust with this high-quality music service.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Ads: Alcoholic Beverages

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Heineken
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In this AdRate study we had the opportunity to test a recent ad by Heineken, “Connections”. The ad reflects how people can stay connected to one another while quarantined during the COVID-19 pandemic. And it touches on the ups and downs of physically-distanced socializing. The ad was a hit! It resonated across all multicultural consumer segments — Hispanic, Black, and Asian — with an A-CFQ score of 75 or higher for each group.

Screenshot of Heineken Advertisement,

From Heineken’s Advertisement, “Connections”.

One interesting insight about this advertisement is that all of the ad elements (music, characters, story, and visuals) struck a chord with viewers. 

It’s not often that we see this kind of  balance among ad features. So this indicates there’s harmony going on in the ad where all the elements play into each other nicely. Achieving harmony among ad elements is an important step in guarding against viewer confusion, an emotional response that can harm an ad’s performance.

Another point worth noting is that this ad was seen as highly relatable.  Remember, it’s about both the ups and downs of socializing while physically distanced. It features themes such as connecting remotely with loved ones and the inevitable tech troubles that I’m sure we’ve all experienced by now. It functions as a reassuring reminder that we’re all in this together — nobody’s wifi or at-home setup is perfect, things kinda suck at times, but we can still kick back with a beer and connect with friends.

Graph showing that Heineken's advertisement elements are well-balanced and relatable
Chart showing high word-of-mouth metrics among viewiers

Our AdRate metrics indicate that Heineken’s ad was seen as both relatable and enjoyable. 68% of viewers felt like this ad was for them. This was above the ad set norm of 60%, making Heineken’s ad the number one relatable ad we tested. 75% of viewers enjoyed the ad. The norm was pretty high for this set at 71%. Even so, this ad raises the bar coming in at number three. And then for both of our metrics that point to an ad’s ability to drive word of mouth influence – talking about the ad with others and reacting to the ad on social media – Heineken’s ad captures over half of viewers. Again, over-indexing compared to the ad set norm, making it the number two most share-worthy ad of the set.

Finally, Heineken’s ad did an excellent job of eliciting positive emotions, likely an effect of it being a highly relatable and clear feel-good ad in the middle of tough times. The ad outperformed most alcoholic beverage ads in evoking happiness – at 49%, it’s far above the norm! And Asian and White viewers over-index, feeling especially happy watching this ad.

Graph showing happy, excited, and proud as highest reported reactions to the ad

We’re constantly conducting AdRate and BrandRate studies for our members that subscribe to the Latinum (multicultural research) and genYZ (generational research) platforms . If you’d like to learn more about the benefits of being a member, please fill out the contact form below.

Don’t forget to save a spot at the next Collage Group virtual webinar! Visit the events page for more details and registration. 

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Personal Care

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Personal Brands: Fenty Beauty
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Which beauty brands appeal to multicultural consumers?

Our most recent BrandRate study shows how young multicultural segments rank Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty, which accumulated nearly $570 million in revenue within 15 months of launching in late 2017. Now worth $17 billion, Fenty Beauty reigns as one of the most gender and skin-tone inclusive makeup brands on the market.

Did Fenty Beauty receive a high B-CFQ ranking among multicultural consumers?

The table below shows the percent of each segment that agrees with each of the six components (Relevance and Trust, for example) of our Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ). We see trends both across segment lines (rows) and across specific components (columns). Acculturated, bicultural, and Black consumers over-index on five of the six components, while White consumers under-index on four of six components.

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Brands that receive a high-ranking B-CFQ scorecard are considered to be culturally fluent, and are more likely than other brands to sustain continuous market growth. Low-ranking B-CFQ scorecards reveal new opportunities for brands to strengthen resonance with young multicultural consumers.

If you’re interested in measuring the cultural fluency of your brand, please fill out the contact form below. 

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