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Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms

Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms
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Moms are essential to running their families, as well as driving brand growth. Dive into our research for strategic insights on how you can capture spending from moms across segments, as well as specifically resonate with Hispanic moms.

We all know moms play an important role in the family, but they’re also a crucial consumer group! They overwhelmingly steer their family’s purchases as they research products, do the shopping, and make countless decisions when it comes to budgeting and spending. However, many moms feel misunderstood by the very brands and companies they’re pouring themselves into as consumers. This means that moms merit specific attention.

It’s also important to recognize that not all moms are alike. After all, racial and ethnic background often shape the way mothers raise children and navigate the challenges of motherhood. Hispanic moms are an especially important group to focus on given the Hispanic segment’s current and projected population and spending growth. Brands that capture Hispanic moms today not only win the moms—they’re also taking steps to capture their children’s attention down the road.

To help you better understand who moms are and how they act as consumers, we’ve compiled data from 2019 Collage Group syndicated research initiatives. We’ve broken the data down by moms vs. non-moms, and further by Hispanicity.

We start off by providing Cultural Attribute Profiles for each group. These profiles reveal how each group scores on important characteristics including: anxiety, cultural rootedness, exceptionalism, independence, adventurousness, and compliance. Then, we cover relationships and family dynamics. Afterwards, we take a deep dive on moms’ path to purchase, including social media influence, product reviews, word-of-mouth, and shopping behaviors. Lastly, our study concludes with a section on what holidays and nightlife are like for moms.

Our insights will help you execute campaigns that will win across the board with moms, and also ways that you can take a targeted approach to resonate with Hispanic moms.

Strategic takeaways from our research include:

  1. Moms are heavy social media users. They use it as a tool to gather product information, as well as to share their own experiences. Brands should have a strong social media presence and make product information accessible. This is also an opportunity to tap into the power of mom influencers to bolster brand awareness.
  2. Preserving culture is a point of concern for Hispanic Moms. They want to ensure their children appreciate their roots. Tap into cultural identity and family themes simultaneously. This intersection is where heritage is top-of-mind for Hispanic Moms.
  3. Moms are the primary drivers of planning, organizing, and spending for special occasions. They love celebrating holidays and making them special for their kids. Holiday activations should be targeted at moms. Highlight your product’s ability to support their holiday celebrations.

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market
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Our post-Superbowl survey on the halftime show found that Hispanic, Black, and White consumers in the “New Wave” (ages 18-39) are receptive to Hispanic culture and messaging. This data further supports our claim that brands can win across this segment with a multicultural message.

Learn how these insights can be applied to your brand.

“I don’t know what [NFL commissioner] Goodell was thinking,” confided a colleague after reflecting on the Superbowl LIV halftime extravaganza featuring Jennifer Lopez and Shakira. “Frankly, I’m shocked he signed off on that thing.”

Google “super bowl halftime controversy 2020” and you’ll get over six million results.  It seems a lot of people shared my friend’s view that Roger Goodell’s decision to feature the Latina superstars was suspect. But many more would likely champion the decision based on the massive positive press around JLo’s celebration of Puerto Rico, Shakira’s nod to her middle eastern heritage, and of course the spike in both artists’ record sales and online streams.

But anecdotal evidence only provides limited insight. To really understand what consumers thought about this culturally charged event, brands need data. So, we fielded a survey to 284 Hispanic, Black, and White consumers age 18-39.  We call this segment the “New Wave,” defined by an experience of growing up in an intrinsically diverse America. The findings from this survey and what they mean for brands are below.

First, and most importantly, the New Wave was exceptionally positive about the halftime show. In fact, almost 80% or more of each segment said they enjoyed the show.

When asked what they liked most, respondents repeatedly mentioned Latinas and Latin culture, as you see in the quotes below.  If Goodell’s intent was to ensure the NFL’s relevance to the 25 million Hispanic NFL fans who are part of America’s fastest growing demographic, then his decision to celebrate Hispanic culture and its growing influence on America was a no-brainer.

Second, almost 70% of women surveyed thought the halftime show empowered women. 23% of White women felt the show objectified women, while less than half that percentage of Hispanic and Black women felt the same. One caveat: Unacculturated Hispanics were slightly more likely (21%) to think the show objectified women.

Third, over 80% of Hispanics thought the show represented Hispanic culture well. And 60% of these individuals also agreed that it represented American culture well. What’s really interesting is that non-Hispanic segments were even more likely to hold this view. Over 80% of the Black respondents and 62% of the White respondents who thought the show represented Hispanic culture well also thought the show represented American culture well. These data reveal that a majority of people can view something as both strongly Hispanic and strongly American – these are not trade-offs.  And you don’t even have to be Hispanic to hold that view.

Our data indicate that the vast majority of the New Wave—18-39 year old Americans—did not find the show particularly controversial and were thrilled about the inclusion of superstar Latinas. This finding is further evidence that brands looking to take the next big step in marketing, which is to lead with multicultural, will be well-positioned to win with the New Wave. Your brand should follow the evidence and lean into the multicultural space to ensure you capture your share of this segment’s attention and loyalty.

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population
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It’s 2019. At this point, no one should be surprised to learn that Hispanic consumers are a must-have for brands that want to maintain and grow market share. Even though the writing’s been on the wall for years, many brands are still struggling to connect with this segment in an authentic and natural manner. A first step to making this sort of connection is to understand who Hispanics are and what they value. Hover over the tiles below to reveal our insights.

Fill out the form for exclusive access to our study.

Hover to Reveal Insights

1.

Age

1.

In addition to being large, the Hispanic segment is also remarkably young, with a median age of 29 compared to 40 for the non-Hispanic population. Hispanic prominence in the U.S. will increase as this young segment ages and their education level and median income continue to rise.

3.

Heritage

3.

Although Hispanics firmly believe in keeping and cultivating their cultural heritage, they have had to adapt culturally as immigrants and minorities. As a result, duality is their reality—they navigate the different cultural worlds they inhabit in a way that is easy and authentic. This ability allows the segment to serve as integrators and amplifiers of culture.

2.

Language

2.

The Spanish language will be an important feature of the U.S. consumer landscape for the foreseeable future. After all, 72% of Hispanics speak Spanish at home, and 85% of Hispanic parents speak Spanish to their children.

4.

Family

4.

Hispanics place an emphasis on family as a source of one’s identity and protection against the hardships of life. They are loyal to family and support each other financially and morally. Family relations are grounded in respect and interdependence.

Related Content

Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms

Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Moms are essential to running their families, as well as driving brand growth. Dive into our research for strategic insights on how you can capture spending from moms across segments, as well as specifically resonate with Hispanic moms.

We all know moms play an important role in the family, but they’re also a crucial consumer group! They overwhelmingly steer their family’s purchases as they research products, do the shopping, and make countless decisions when it comes to budgeting and spending. However, many moms feel misunderstood by the very brands and companies they’re pouring themselves into as consumers. This means that moms merit specific attention.

It’s also important to recognize that not all moms are alike. After all, racial and ethnic background often shape the way mothers raise children and navigate the challenges of motherhood. Hispanic moms are an especially important group to focus on given the Hispanic segment’s current and projected population and spending growth. Brands that capture Hispanic moms today not only win the moms—they’re also taking steps to capture their children’s attention down the road.

To help you better understand who moms are and how they act as consumers, we’ve compiled data from 2019 Collage Group syndicated research initiatives. We’ve broken the data down by moms vs. non-moms, and further by Hispanicity.

We start off by providing Cultural Attribute Profiles for each group. These profiles reveal how each group scores on important characteristics including: anxiety, cultural rootedness, exceptionalism, independence, adventurousness, and compliance. Then, we cover relationships and family dynamics. Afterwards, we take a deep dive on moms’ path to purchase, including social media influence, product reviews, word-of-mouth, and shopping behaviors. Lastly, our study concludes with a section on what holidays and nightlife are like for moms.

Our insights will help you execute campaigns that will win across the board with moms, and also ways that you can take a targeted approach to resonate with Hispanic moms.

Strategic takeaways from our research include:

  1. Moms are heavy social media users. They use it as a tool to gather product information, as well as to share their own experiences. Brands should have a strong social media presence and make product information accessible. This is also an opportunity to tap into the power of mom influencers to bolster brand awareness.
  2. Preserving culture is a point of concern for Hispanic Moms. They want to ensure their children appreciate their roots. Tap into cultural identity and family themes simultaneously. This intersection is where heritage is top-of-mind for Hispanic Moms.
  3. Moms are the primary drivers of planning, organizing, and spending for special occasions. They love celebrating holidays and making them special for their kids. Holiday activations should be targeted at moms. Highlight your product’s ability to support their holiday celebrations.

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Our post-Superbowl survey on the halftime show found that Hispanic, Black, and White consumers in the “New Wave” (ages 18-39) are receptive to Hispanic culture and messaging. This data further supports our claim that brands can win across this segment with a multicultural message.

Learn how these insights can be applied to your brand.

“I don’t know what [NFL commissioner] Goodell was thinking,” confided a colleague after reflecting on the Superbowl LIV halftime extravaganza featuring Jennifer Lopez and Shakira. “Frankly, I’m shocked he signed off on that thing.”

Google “super bowl halftime controversy 2020” and you’ll get over six million results.  It seems a lot of people shared my friend’s view that Roger Goodell’s decision to feature the Latina superstars was suspect. But many more would likely champion the decision based on the massive positive press around JLo’s celebration of Puerto Rico, Shakira’s nod to her middle eastern heritage, and of course the spike in both artists’ record sales and online streams.

But anecdotal evidence only provides limited insight. To really understand what consumers thought about this culturally charged event, brands need data. So, we fielded a survey to 284 Hispanic, Black, and White consumers age 18-39.  We call this segment the “New Wave,” defined by an experience of growing up in an intrinsically diverse America. The findings from this survey and what they mean for brands are below.

First, and most importantly, the New Wave was exceptionally positive about the halftime show. In fact, almost 80% or more of each segment said they enjoyed the show.

When asked what they liked most, respondents repeatedly mentioned Latinas and Latin culture, as you see in the quotes below.  If Goodell’s intent was to ensure the NFL’s relevance to the 25 million Hispanic NFL fans who are part of America’s fastest growing demographic, then his decision to celebrate Hispanic culture and its growing influence on America was a no-brainer.

Second, almost 70% of women surveyed thought the halftime show empowered women. 23% of White women felt the show objectified women, while less than half that percentage of Hispanic and Black women felt the same. One caveat: Unacculturated Hispanics were slightly more likely (21%) to think the show objectified women.

Third, over 80% of Hispanics thought the show represented Hispanic culture well. And 60% of these individuals also agreed that it represented American culture well. What’s really interesting is that non-Hispanic segments were even more likely to hold this view. Over 80% of the Black respondents and 62% of the White respondents who thought the show represented Hispanic culture well also thought the show represented American culture well. These data reveal that a majority of people can view something as both strongly Hispanic and strongly American – these are not trade-offs.  And you don’t even have to be Hispanic to hold that view.

Our data indicate that the vast majority of the New Wave—18-39 year old Americans—did not find the show particularly controversial and were thrilled about the inclusion of superstar Latinas. This finding is further evidence that brands looking to take the next big step in marketing, which is to lead with multicultural, will be well-positioned to win with the New Wave. Your brand should follow the evidence and lean into the multicultural space to ensure you capture your share of this segment’s attention and loyalty.

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

It’s 2019. At this point, no one should be surprised to learn that Hispanic consumers are a must-have for brands that want to maintain and grow market share. Even though the writing’s been on the wall for years, many brands are still struggling to connect with this segment in an authentic and natural manner. A first step to making this sort of connection is to understand who Hispanics are and what they value. Hover over the tiles below to reveal our insights.

Fill out the form for exclusive access to our study.

Hover to Reveal Insights

1.

Age

1.

In addition to being large, the Hispanic segment is also remarkably young, with a median age of 29 compared to 40 for the non-Hispanic population. Hispanic prominence in the U.S. will increase as this young segment ages and their education level and median income continue to rise.

3.

Heritage

3.

Although Hispanics firmly believe in keeping and cultivating their cultural heritage, they have had to adapt culturally as immigrants and minorities. As a result, duality is their reality—they navigate the different cultural worlds they inhabit in a way that is easy and authentic. This ability allows the segment to serve as integrators and amplifiers of culture.

2.

Language

2.

The Spanish language will be an important feature of the U.S. consumer landscape for the foreseeable future. After all, 72% of Hispanics speak Spanish at home, and 85% of Hispanic parents speak Spanish to their children.

4.

Family

4.

Hispanics place an emphasis on family as a source of one’s identity and protection against the hardships of life. They are loyal to family and support each other financially and morally. Family relations are grounded in respect and interdependence.

Related Content

How Brands can Engage During Hispanic Heritage Month

,
How Brands can Engage During Hispanic Heritage Month
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Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15. It’s time to start thinking about what your brand can do to connect with these important consumers. Marketers wonder about their permission to play during heritage months and, should they choose to activate, whether consumers will respond positively.

Our latest research on Holidays and Occasions provides a deep dive into cultural and heritage months, along with 9 other occasions. Don’t miss exploring these compelling new insights and activation case studies.

Learn how this study can be applied to your brand.

KEY INSIGHTS FOR HISPANIC CONSUMERS

Hispanics celebrate their heritage month primarily through food. Pursue experiential marketing campaigns featuring food and/or educational events in the segments’ communities to highlight their value to your brand.

The most common reaction that Hispanics have to Hispanic Heritage Month activations is one of pride. During Hispanic Heritage Month, highlight historical contributions of Hispanics to America make consumers feel proud and included.

Related Content

Strategies for Activating the Hispanic Audience

As America’s cultural landscape continues to shift, brands and creative agencies need to adapt.