Posts

Collage Group Launches LGBTQ+ & Gender Consumer Research Program

Collage Group Launches LGBTQ+ & Gender Consumer Research Program

Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce the launch of our LGBTQ+ & Gender consumer research program. Read below for additional information and stay tuned for more across the next few weeks.

Beginning in 2021, we will be exploring consumer trends across the LGBTQ+ community and deepening our insight into gender with a dedicated focus on women consumers, while covering transgender, non-binary and other segments where applicable.  As always, our research reflects a total market perspective, meaning that we will compare these segments non-LGTBQ+ and men where applicable and relevant.

With new narratives and research streams dedicated to LGBTQ+ and women, member brands will be uniquely positioned to combine insight into these influential segments with the deep insights we already provide on Generational and Multicultural Segments.  The launch could not be more timely as consumers raise the bar on their expectations of brands in a time of profound cultural transformation.

Members of Collage Group’s LGBTQ+ & Gender program gain access to:

1. Ten or more NEW reports released throughout 2021 (1 – 2 times/month).

2. Research and insights covered by our comprehensive Essentials of LGBTQ+ Consumers and Essentials of Women Consumers, comprising demographics and expenditure, cultural traits, passion points and media habits

Our research will provide useful answers to brand questions, including:

• Which ad themes and strategies resonate among these segments and why?

• How do I engage the modern American woman?

• What are the primary passion points for LGBTQ+ and women consumers?

• How do LGBTQ+ and women consumers engage across consumer industries?

• What are the latest socio-political trends among these segments?

• How are Americans across gender and sexuality using social media and streaming platforms?

• What are the latest health and wellness trends for women and LGBTQ+ consumers?

• What has been the impact of COVID on consumer attitudes within these segments?

Fill out the form below to learn more about membership.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

The Self-Aware Generation: How Gen Z Consumers Choose to Self-Identify

The Self-Aware Generation: How Gen Z Consumers Choose to Self-Identify

From sexuality to star signs, Gen Z self-identifies in more ways than older consumers. Here’s what brands need to know to activate on the many ways America’s youngest consumers self-identify.

Gen Z has grown up in an increasingly diverse and polarized America. At the same time, social media continues to generate new universes of micro-communities, each creating new ways to self-identify. As a result, these young consumers embrace more and more what makes them different, as individuals, rather than what makes them the same as everyone around them.

Given the vast landscape of identities open to Gen Z, it is essential for brands to understand what, if anything, these young consumers do hold in common. Here are some key insights to get you started:

1. Gen Z is the most self-aware of its status as a “generation”.

All individuals born from 1997 through 2012 can claim membership in Generation Z. which follows Generation Y, or the “Millennial” Generation. While there is not yet final consensus on whether Gen Z will receive such a title, we see tremendous interest within the generation in using whatever words are available for self-identification. Almost half of Gen Z consumers use their generational identity to describe themselves to others, with statistically significant differences from each of the other generational segments. With phrases like “ok boomer” and “zoomer humor” ever-present in the Gen Z lexicon, generational identity is very real for these youngest of adult consumers.

2. Gen Z is most likely to think sexuality is important to identity.

Today’s young consumers live in a world which not only accepts sexual identity, but also encourages individuals to celebrate and explore their own sexualityGen Z is the most likely generation to identify as part of the LGBTQ+ community. And 1 in 5 Gen Z consumers say that sexuality is one of the most important aspects of their identities for self-description, with statistically significant differences from each of the other generational segments. Understanding the LGBTQ+ segment will only increase in importance for brands hoping to earn market share with this segment.

3. Gen Z continues the Millennial trend of embracing “alternative” sources of identity – astrology included!

While they’re not likely to be checking the morning papers for their daily horoscopes, roughly 2 in 5 Gen Z and Millennial consumers leverage the Western zodiac as a tool for self-identification. Apps and online resources allow consumers to gain hyper-personalized “insight” into their astrological identities through star charts and compatibility analysis with contacts who also use the same platforms. Additionally, the Gen Z meme ecosystem provides (often humorous) content which reinforces associations between star signs and individual personality. These webs of association also offer plenty of space for brands to make connections with their product offerings.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Who’s on My Side? Multicultural Perceptions of Polarization and Major U.S. Political Parties

Who’s on My Side? Multicultural Perceptions of Polarization and Major U.S. Political Parties
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Regardless of the outcome of the 2020 Presidential Election, many Americans will not feel as if America’s political parties truly represent people like them. Here’s what we know about whether multicultural segments think either Democrats or Republicans have their best interests at heart.

With America’s cultural transformation, all brands must pivot to reach and meet the needs of multicultural consumers. Political brands are no exception – so how well are these brands, more commonly known as parties, doing with America’s fastest-growing segments?

This October, we at Collage Group surveyed 2,372 Americans on a series of questions about the current state of U.S. politics. We sought to learn how multicultural segments approach the issue of political polarization, and, importantly, which groups of people they think the Democratic and Republican parties represent. From this, we learned to what extent each multicultural segment perceives the major parties as on “their” side, as well as serving the interests of a selection of other groups, including women, the LGBTQ+ community, and retirees.

At the topline level, the answers are largely to be expected: Americans see the Democrats as most likely to support the interests of multicultural segments. Indeed, Americans overall see the Republican Party as best serving the interests of “White People,” and Democrats the interests of the Hispanic, Black, and Asian communities.

But there are important nuances, including:

1. While a plurality of consumers sees the Democrats as better for certain constituencies, these numbers never reach a majority, even when considering segments traditionally thought of as being supported by Democratic platforms.

We find the greatest consensus when considering the LGBTQ+ community, for whom 43 percent of Americans see the Democrats as being the favored political party, with only 14 percent choosing the Republicans. For other segments, such as “parents,” the gap is far narrower, with 27 percent of consumers thinking Democrats are better for America’s parents, and 23 percent choosing Republicans.

2. Black Americans are the most likely segment to see Democrats as best serving not only Black communities, but also the interests of parents and retirees.

The affinity Black consumers have towards the Democratic party is more complex and nuanced than one might think. Over half (55 percent) of the Black segment sees Democrats as doing the most for Black communities, which is the strongest level of agreement for any racial/ethnic segment regarding any of the constituencies addressed. But Black consumers independently over-index on seeing Democrats as doing more for retirees (41 percent) and parents (38 percent).

3. Hispanic Americans, especially the Unacculturated segment, are least convinced that either major party does the most to serve the interests of immigrants.

While 43 percent of consumers see the Democrats as best serving the interests of the immigrant community, the Hispanic segment under-indexes here, at 35 percent. But it is not that they think Republicans are good for immigrants, as they under-indexing on that sentiment as well. Rather, Hispanic consumers are most likely to say that neither party serves the interests of the immigrant community. This is especially true for the Unacculturated Hispanic segment, of whom 30 percent see neither Republicans nor Democrats as supporting immigrants.

4. While three quarters of Americans are concerned about increasing political polarization, less than half of the Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic segments are concerned.

Only 46 percent of Bicultural Hispanic consumers, and 16 percent of the Unacculturated Hispanic segment, are concerned about the state of political polarization in the United States. We think there are three interrelated reasons for this. First, across a variety of subject areas we see Hispanic consumers expressing higher optimism than other segments. Second, Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic consumers are more likely to compare their experiences in the U.S. with those of their countries of origin, which, especially from their perspectives, are often worse when it comes to governance and the political process. Finally, many of these consumers are not citizens, and therefore may feel a lower personal stake in the in the American electoral system.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

What Brands Need To Know About the LGBTQ+ Community

What Brands Need To Know About the LGBTQ+ Community
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from, “What Brands Need to Know About the LGBTQ+ Community”.

The LGBTQ+ community in America is young, fast-growing, and diverse. And it should be part of every brand’s growth strategy! Dive into our research for strategic insights on what makes this group unique and how you can connect with them to drive brand growth.

But it’s not enough to put rainbows on your advertisements and call it a day. LGBTQ+ consumers and their allies expect brands to back up their words with relevant donations, year-round support, and equality in internal company policy. And they need activations that feel authentic.

To help our members better understand and connect with the LGBTQ+ segment, we’ve created a study that leverages data from 2019 and 2020 Collage Group syndicated research initiatives, broken down by LGBTQ+ status and age groups. The centerpiece is our Cultural Attributes Profile, built from a dataset of almost 1,200 LGBTQ+ consumers!

We start off with some basic demographics of the segment, followed by their unique Cultural Attributes Profile. This profile reveals how they score on important characteristics including: anxiety, rootedness, exceptionalism, independence, adventurousness, and compliance. Then, we look at the LGBTQ+ segment’s influence profile, and specific social issues the group feels strongly about. Finally, our study concludes with a section on tips and takeaways for marketing to the LGBTQ+ segment. Below are three takeaways to get you started.

It’s no secret that America is quickly becoming more and more diverse. One fast-growing group is the LGBTQ+ community. Estimates show this segment includes at least 12 million American adults. And as laws change and societal acceptance increases, more and more people feel comfortable embracing their LGBTQ+ identities and are raising their hands to be counted. And they have money to spend – over $917 billion in purchasing power in 2017!

When you factor in LGBTQ+ allies—Americans that support the drive for greater LGBTQ+ rights and acceptance—the market size and spending balloon. Any brand that wants to succeed in 21st Century America needs to understand who these people are and how to connect with them.

Key takeaways include:

  1. The U.S. LGBTQ+ segment will continue to grow in both size and share of total population as society becomes more accepting of differing gender and sexual identities. Growth will be greatest among younger consumers who feel more comfortable self-identifying as LGBTQ+.

  2. LGBTQ+ consumers, across both the New Wave (18-39 years old) and 40+ segments, are similar in their core values to the New Wave as a whole. This is a result of New Wave consumers growing up in an inherently diverse society which celebrates and embraces once-marginalized identities.

  3. As LGBTQ+ stories and influencers captivate U.S. audiences, members and allies of this segment have higher expectations for authentic representations of LGBTQ+ individuals and content. This may result in accusations of “pinkwashing” when brands fail to meet these expectation

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Get on Top of 2020’s Hottest Upcoming genYZ Trend: Voting!

Get on Top of 2020’s Hottest Upcoming genYZ Trend: Voting!
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

The 2018 U.S. midterm elections saw a dramatic increase in voter participation for younger generations. Here’s what brands and companies need to know about Millennial and Gen Z voter turnout to build consumer equity through the 2020 election and beyond.

We’re less than 100 days from the 2020 presidential election. Over the past weeks, we’ve heard many of our members ask what they can do to best activate on this major, and majorly controversial, occasion.  Our answer? Get out the vote.

Recent work by researchers at the Harvard Kennedy School reveals how leading brands have approached voter participation initiatives as part of a strategy for “meeting consumer expectations for engagement in social and political issues, raising brand awareness with new audiences, and increasing employee satisfaction.” In 2020, Gen Z and Millennial consumers will be at the heart of this strategy.

It has long been the conventional wisdom that younger Americans are less likely to vote than retirees who have fewer pressures on their time. But if you take a closer look at the data, a different story emerges – younger consumers value voting more than older generations did at their age.

Just look at voter participation rates. Comparing turnout in the first midterm and presidential elections for Gen X (1990 and 1988), Millennials (2006 and 2004), and Gen Z (2018 and predicted for 2020), we see a clear upward trend. While only 23 percent of eligible Gen X and Millennial consumers voted in their first midterms, 30 percent of Gen Z did. And Collage Group research estimates that at least 59 percent of eligible Gen Z consumers will cast their ballots in 2020, a significant majority compared to previous generations.

But the generational gap persists, which offers an opportunity for brands to step in and make a tangible difference. Only a slim majority of Millennials (51%) voted in the 2016 presidential election, with even fewer voting in 2018 (42%)

What does this all mean for brands and companies? If you want younger consumers to recognize your efforts in promoting social causes, voting must be top of mind. There are plenty of organizations you can partner with and support to accomplish this goal, including:

As part of either these strategic partnerships or your own campaigns, you need to be able to communicate effectively with youth consumers on the issues that matter to them. Out of the box thinking is needed to connect with potential voters who have not already been convinced by the existing messages thrown their way, and brands can take the lead in pushing for such innovation.

Celebrating Pride Month in the Age of #BlackLivesMatter

Celebrating Pride Month in the Age of #BlackLivesMatter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Ongoing protests against racism and police violence in America have refocused Pride Month on its protest roots. Read on to discover how the LGBTQ+ community is engaging in support of #BlackLivesMatter.

June is Pride Month. And there is plenty for the LGBTQ+ community to celebrate – earlier this month, for example, the Supreme Court ruled that federal employment protections cover LGBTQ+ people. While only 8% of respondents to a 2019 Collage Group survey say they celebrate Pride Month regularly, this figure jumps to 18% for Gen Z. Young people are more likely than ever to be supportive of LGBTQ+ rights, and are far more likely than older generations to personally identify as LGBTQ+.

Recent years have seen ever-growing Pride Month celebrations, including parades across the world and recognition from many of the world’s biggest brands. In 2020, both the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing anti-racism protests make it impossible to celebrate Pride Month like usual. As gay rights have expanded and acceptance of the LGBTQ+ community has grown, Pride Month has become something more akin to a party than a protest. This year, however, advocates encouraged people to remember that Pride has its roots in the struggle between marginalized communities, including communities of color, and the police.

On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village, New York City. The patrons resisted, and protests grew violent. Stonewall attracted a diverse clientele of people across the LGBTQ+ spectrum. While the exact sequence of events is fuzzy, many credit Black and Hispanic transgender women, including activists Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and Stormé DeLarverie with leading the fight that evening. LGBTQ+ people and allies from the surrounding neighborhoods flocked to join the protests, which lasted five days. The Stonewall Riots represented a turning point in the gay rights movement. Afterward, gay rights organizations and publications sprang up around the country. In 1970, the LGBTQ+ community marched through New York City on the anniversary of the riots, participating in what is widely thought of as the first Pride Parade.

Recognition of this history has led to increased activism. In our recent survey on racism and current events, we found that LGBTQ+ consumers are significantly more likely than non-LGBTQ+ consumers to have engaged in direct action in support of the #BlackLivesMatter movement in recent weeks.

This segment’s activism has direct implications for brands and corporations. LGBTQ+ consumers are significantly more likely than non-LGBTQ+ consumers to believe companies have a responsibility to speak out against racism and advocate for changes in government policy.

And they are more willing to support those brands that do take a stand. 64 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents said they would be “more likely to buy products from brands and companies that take a stand against police violence,” in comparison to 47 percent of non-LGBTQ+ consumers.

If your brand wants to capture market share with the LGBTQ+ segment, remember that their fight for equality and civil rights has always existed in parallel, and often hand-in-hand, with the struggle for racial justice. That’s a strategy you can employ every month, not just in June.

Discover More Insights