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Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

What matters most to American consumers across racial and ethnic segments? Collage Group's latest study covers major Multicultural Passion Points your brand can act on immediately.

What are Passion Points?

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 Passion Points we know Americans care deeply about. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started, let’s look at some topline findings about the things that matter most across both segments and the Passion Points themselves.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

When we asked people if they like watching movies in theaters more than at home, and if they prefer “enhanced” movie experiences, like IMAX or 3D, less than half of the total population agreed. But it’s the Non-Hispanic White segment which is driving this low agreement. Multicultural segments were more likely to say they prefer watching movies in theaters, and that they prefer IMAX and 3D movie experiences.

When we double click into acculturation, we see that bicultural and unacculturated Hispanics are the ones really driving the Hispanic desire for theaters and enhanced movie experiences.  Acculturated Hispanic consumers are less likely to enjoy watching movies in theaters (42%H ; Bi: 54% ; Un: 63%H), or having an “enhanced” movie experience (41%H ; Bi: 56% ; Un: 56%).

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Which genres are most popular across multicultural segments?

For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But all three multicultural segments under-index on rock music. Especially the Black segment, where only 11 percent say they choose rock! What do these consumers listen to instead? 

For Black Americans, the answer is R&B – seven in ten Black consumers choose R&B over other genres. Black consumers are also most likely to listen to Hip-Hop, Jazz, Blues, Soul, and Gospel music.

For Asian Americans, the answer is Pop music – half of Asian consumers say they choose Pop over other genres. Asian consumers are also most likely to choose electronic and K-Pop music.

And for Hispanic Americans, the most popular music genre is Latin Pop, including Reggaeton. About a third of Hispanic consumers say they choose this genre over other options.

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

About half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and the Black segment – at 56 percent – is more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers believe this.

We also see that while less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts,” all multicultural segments are more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers to do so.

While only a quarter of White consumers are “health nuts,” over a third of Asian, Black, and Hispanic consumers are. With Unacculturated Hispanic consumers being the most likely, at 48 percent, compared to the other Hispanic Acculturation segments.

And while most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Multicultural Americans lead the “health nut” trend. 

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

When we asked consumers to choose between traveling domestically or internationally, most of the Hispanic and Asian segments chose international travel. As you can see on the chart, only 48 percent – about half – of Hispanic consumers chose domestic travel, and even fewer – 38 percent – of Asian respondents opted for the U.S. option. Within the Hispanic segment, bicultural and unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely than their acculturated peers to prefer international travel.

The Black and Non-Hispanic White consumer segments, on the other hand, prefer domestic over international travel.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Multiselect, Max. 3

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Forced choice

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

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Five Things You Need To Know About Hispanic Consumers in 2021

Five Things To Know About Hispanic Consumers in 2021

Interested in deeper engagements with Hispanic Americans? Read on for 5 takeaways and download our presentation on enhancing your brand's ability to authentically connect with this high-growth consumer segment.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Hispanic Consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research for the Hispanic segment: demographics and economic opportunity, identity-related marketing expectations, and Cultural Traits. Read below for several takeaways, watch a replay of our recent Insights Association presentation and download an excerpt to go deeper.

1. The Hispanic segment is fast growing and economically powerful. It is expected to almost double over the next 40 years, growing from 60 million to 111 million people.

2. Despite comprising just 18% of the population, Hispanic Americans were responsible for 26% of real expenditure growth between 2009 and 2019.

3. Ethnicity is an important component of most Hispanic Americans’ identity, but this does vary by acculturation.

4. One way identity reveals its importance in the segment is the extent to which Hispanic consumers say they want to support brands that support Hispanic people.

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Four Group Traits That Best Characterize Asian American Consumers

Four Cultural Traits That Best Characterize Asian American Consumers

Collage Group's latest consumer report on Asian Cultural Traits provides powerful new insights into this critically important demographic. Fill out the form to download an excerpt specific to the expertise-seeking cultural trait.

The Asian American segment is the fastest-growing racial/ethnic segment in the United States today. By 2060, Collage Group projects the Asian segment will almost double in size to 36 million people—roughly 9% of the total U.S. population. To capture this growth, brands and marketers must deepen their understanding of the Asian consumer segment.

Which Cultural Traits best characterize Asian Consumers?

The four Group Traits that best characterize the Asian segment are Cultural Duality, Conventionality, Reservedness, and Expertise-Seeking.

1. Cultural Duality

Cultural Duality captures the feeling of being both “American” and simultaneously identifying with another culture or heritage.

Individuals exhibiting this Group Trait constantly find new ways to both keep old traditions alive and redefine American culture in their own image. Both Asian and Hispanic Americans strongly exhibit this group trait.

While Asian Americans strongly believe in upholding the traditions of their countries of origin, they also feel a connection with American culture. This embrace of multiple aspects of their backgrounds leads to cultural fluidity – the ability to seamlessly navigate multiple cultural spheres – and a unique Asian American identity.

For Asian Americans, Cultural Duality is more than a feeling, it’s an active commitment to continue their traditions. Through food, holidays, religion, family connection, and more, Asian Americans are significantly more likely than non-Asians to report they still actively practice the traditions of their family’s heritage.

2. Conventionality

People sharing the Group Trait of Conventionality tend to aspire to tried-and-true lifestyles and ideas of what people should be doing in their general situations.

Concepts like “living the American Dream” will likely hold more sway with these individuals than anything positioned as part of an “alternative lifestyle.”

Asian Americans desire and pursue conventional lives marked by advanced education, stable jobs, marriage, and children. While this desire is weaker in younger Asian Americans, it continues to set the segment apart and manifest as an interest in traditional forms of success. The drive for conventionality comes from the desires to make one’s family proud and fit in with others.

Asians are significantly more likely than non-Asians to agree with the statement, “the way I live my life is mainly in line with what’s normal and expected for most people.” Asian Americans are also significantly less likely than other segments to report wanting to live unconventionally. This doesn’t mean they don’t aspire to success, but rather that they aspire to traditional successes like higher education and home ownership.

3. Reservedness

People exhibiting the Group Trait of Reservedness tend to be more private, and less likely to express what makes them unique, special, or otherwise interesting.

This does not mean they have nothing to say or lead boring lives; rather, they are simply content keeping these things to themselves.

Asian Americans are less likely than other segments to share their inner selves, including their thoughts, opinions, and feelings. This attitude stems from the emphasis on humility and self-effacement common in collectivist societies. However, younger Asian Americans, especially those raised in the United States, are embracing the outgoing and gregarious character often associated with Americans.

The instinct to go with the flow and keep thoughts to themselves can be linked to the collectivist tendencies of many Asian cultures. Asian Americans’ collectivism, which values the good of the many over the individual, sometimes manifests in a reluctance to say or do potentially inflammatory things with the goal to preserve peace in a situation.

4. Expertise-Seeking

People sharing this Group Trait look to experts – or sources of expertise – for advice.

Whether from certified professionals or the people they know who are more experienced on a subject, these individuals are more likely to seek out external sources of information before making important decisions.

Asian Americans, across country of origin, are focused on making sound decisions to ensure promising futures. This includes openness to both input from actual experts (physicians, financial advisors, etc.), as well as input from peers on topics of interest. Members of the segment often seek peer input to stay abreast of the latest trends.

Similar to the previous Group Trait of Reservedness, the collectivist attitudes of Asian Americans influence their tendency to trust experts. Collectivism requires self-effacement and humility, which results in the belief that you alone do not know what’s best and that you should seek advice before making big or small decisions.

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Insights for Authentic Black Representation: Panel Discussion

Insights for Authentic Black Representation: Panel Discussion

Collage Group hosted a panel discussion on authentic representation of Black consumers in marketing. Attended by over 200 professionals, our panel of five leaders in Insights, Marketing and Diversity & Inclusion provided extraordinary insight into the opportunity for brands to better serve this pivotal segment.

Watch a recording of our webinar, “Insights for Authentic Black Representationby filling out the form below.

This webinar includes a panel discussion with diversity, insights, marketing and research leaders from CVS Health, McCormick & Company, U.S. Bank, TVOne and Diageo about Black identity and authentic representation in marketing.

At the start of Black History Month in 2021, Collage Group hosted a panel discussion with diversity, marketing and research leaders from CVS Health, McCormick & Company, U.S. Bank, TVOne and Diageo for a conversation about Black identity and authentic representation in marketing. We are confident this discussion will help brands amplify and support Black voices and accelerate your journey to Cultural Fluency.

The session began with a presentation from Collage Vice President of Client Services Zekeera Belton and Collage Chief Product Officer David Evans, who presented recent research into the mindset of Black Americans today and what brands need to know.  Zekeera then facilitated discussion on the importance of authentic Black representation, the risk that misrepresentation can shine a negative light on the community, and the need to show Black Americans without reliance on stale stereotypes that now pose major risks for brands.  They discussed what brands are learning in this pivotal hour of American history and how brands should better serve Black consumers.

Panelists included leaders from America’s top brands, right.

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Four Group Traits That Best Characterize Black Consumers

Four Group Traits That Best Characterize Black Consumers

Our newly updated Black Cultural Traits provides powerful new insights into America’s largest generation and one of its most diverse.

Watch a recording of our webinar, “Insights for Authentic Black Representationby filling out the form below.

This webinar includes a panel discussion with diversity, insights, marketing and research leaders from CVS Health, McCormick & Company, U.S. Bank, TVOne and Diageo about Black identity and authentic representation in marketing.

The Black segment continues to grow steadily, both in absolute numbers and as a share of the total U.S. population.

By 2060, Collage projects Black consumers to represent 55 million consumers, or 14 percent of the total U.S. population. To capture the growth and influence of these consumers, brands and marketers must deepen their understanding of the Black consumer segment.  Originally, released in the Fall of 2020, this page now includes the webinar replay presented January 27, 2021.​

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from the study.

Which Group Traits best characterize Black Consumers?

The four Group Traits which best characterize the Black segment are Perseverance, Ambition, Realness, and Self-Expression.

1. Perseverance

People sharing the Group Trait of Perseverance are deeply motivated to carry on in their personal pursuits despite whatever struggles and setbacks they face.

These individuals are less likely to give up what they put their minds to and more likely to take obstacles as motivation to work even harder.

Black resilience, determination, and tenacity stem from a history of adversity and oppression. Black Americans are acutely aware of the challenges they face, and they know that achieving their own success often requires more hard work than it does for others. Individual drive and hope for a better tomorrow motivate Black Americans to overcome the barriers they face in pursuit of their goals.

It is important to remember, though, that this spirit of perseverance is forward-looking and closely linked to the segment’s Optimism. As the data below shows, a large majority of Black consumers are confident that their lives will continue to get better and that things will work out for them in the end. Black consumer substantially over-index on these sentiments compared to their non-Black counterparts.

2. Ambition

People sharing the Group Trait of Ambition are driven to succeed and to focus on the necessary steps to achieve their goals.

These individuals are sensitive to barriers to success and attuned to the way that today’s choices can impact future goals.

Nobody knows what the future holds, but Black Americans already have a plan for it. They’re hyper-focused on their own futures and have record-breaking and history-making in sight, for both themselves and their communities. Giving back to the community and paying it forward so that future generations can reach for even greater heights is itself a powerful goal of many Black consumers.

Black consumers have high standards for their own individual accomplishments. They’re the most likely segment to say they’re “always trying to be the best and make it to the top.” The segment is also much more likely to say they will do important things in life than the White segment.

3. Realness

People sharing the Group Trait of Realness emphasize being true to themselves over any attempt to “put on a mask” in the presence of others.

These individuals are more likely to “live their truth, even if this means sacrificing relationships with those who may not accept them.

Black consumers are self-assured and take pride in themselves. From Black bodies to Black lived experience, Black Americans emphasize the importance of individuals living their truth and embracing the maxim “if you can’t be anyone but yourself, you might as well be the best possible version.”

Put simply, Black consumers are less likely to “filter” themselves based on expectations of how other people might react. One implication of this Group Trait is the expectation for content which reflects Black lived experiences as they truly are. Black consumers want to see representations of people who not only look like them, but also go through experiences which they can relate to. There is great demand for authentic and nuanced portrayals of Black life, and much power in getting those portrayals right.

4. Self-Expression

People sharing the Group Trait of Self-Expression have talent and creative potential they can’t wait to share with the world.

These individuals know they have something special to offer and are more likely to take whatever opportunities they can find to broadcast their craft and artistry.

Black Americans know what makes them special and want to share it with the world. From high fashion and artistic excellence to everyday expertise and influence, Black voices have undeniable power. And Black consumers know that their uniqueness leads to opportunities for excellence and exceptionalism.

The importance of Self-expression in the Black segment positions these consumers as major drivers of influence. In addition to the high value they place on sharing their talents, Black Americans are also more likely than other segments to see themselves as valuable sources of expertise and recommendation with opinions others need to hear. And they often seek out opportunities for spreading their voices and influencing others.

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Four Group Traits that Best Characterize Hispanic Consumers

Four Group Traits that Best Characterize Hispanic Consumers

The Hispanic segment accounts for most of U.S. population growth over the past decade, primarily driven by U.S.-born Acculturated and Bicultural Hispanics.

By 2060, Collage projects Hispanic consumers to represent 28 percent of the total U.S. population. To capture this growth, brands and marketers must deepen their understanding of the Hispanic consumer segment.

Across the last several years, Collage Group has been developing powerful new tools to help brands become more Culturally Fluent.  Our Cultural Traits are central to this effort. These data-driven tools provide measures of cultural variation that reveal insights into the similarities and differences across consumer segments.  Collage Group members use these tools to build more efficient general market campaigns, as well as more effective dedicated activations. 

The four Group Traits that best characterize the Hispanic segment are Cultural Duality, Optimism, Warmth, and Tuned-In.

1. Cultural Duality

Cultural Duality captures the feeling of being both “American” and simultaneously identifying with another culture or heritage. Individuals exhibiting this Group Trait constantly find new ways to both keep old traditions alive and redefine American culture in their own image.

Although Hispanic Americans firmly believe in keeping and cultivating their cultural heritage, they have had to adapt culturally as immigrants and minorities. As a result, duality is their reality—they seamlessly navigate both worlds with a cultural fluidity that is easy and authentic.

2. Optimism

Optimism refers to the proclivity to see one’s future as full of opportunity and promise.

Rather than worrying about the possibility of things going wrong, individuals exhibiting this Group Trait are confident that, in the long run, their problems will work themselves out and their lives will continue to improve.

Despite adversity and current anti-Hispanic sentiment, Hispanic Americans are still optimistic and hopeful about their future in the U.S., as a population and on an individual level. They challenge themselves to achieve success and trust that hard work will get them there.

3. Warmth

Warmth conveys one’s desire to prioritize having personal and “human” relationships with those around them. Individuals exhibiting this Group Trait want others to be as comfortable as possible in their presence, regardless of how long they’ve known one another or the specifics of their interactions.

Hispanic Americans place high value on creating warm, friendly, informal relationships with everyone they know and meet. The focus on informality doesn’t negate the existence of hierarchical roles or deference to authority—rather, it allows a bond of mutual respect, understanding, and trust to form. While this trait is slightly stronger in older Hispanics, younger Hispanics will likely embrace it as they age.

4. Tuned-In

Tuned-In represents a desire to keep up with the current cultural moment, especially when it comes to entertainment. People exhibiting this Group Trait are more likely to seek out and participate in the latest of trends and popular culture, and to have little shame in going along with “mainstream” tastes.

Hispanic Americans are open-minded and adventurous. Their lived experience adapting to cultures and their optimistic attitude culminate in a desire to insert themselves into the mainstream. They want to both understand and contribute to the current moment. And for as much as their environment shapes them, they equally wield influence.

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While Love of Family Is Universal, Representation Must Be Nuanced

While Love of Family Is Universal, Representation Must Be Nuanced

Family is a commonly shared value across diverse segments, but that doesn’t mean it’s one-size-fits-all. Read on to understand the nuances within multicultural family life for authentic representation and effective connection on the path towards Cultural Fluency.

Fill out the form to download a sample of the study.

Human beings are social by nature – this is universally true. No matter our background, we all crave connection. We value family and anchor our lives to our loved ones.

Our research confirms that family matters to pretty much everyone, but our data also reveals: how is family experienced and expressed differently across cultural backgrounds?

These subtleties aren’t just food for thought – getting them right matters. Multicultural Americans, especially Black and Unacculturated Hispanic consumers, say it matters a lot to them that advertisements represent families that look like theirs. And a fifth of Americans, especially Black consumers, want to see more non-traditional family structures represented.

How should brands activate on the shared value of family connection?

Brands must understand nuances in multicultural family dynamics to accurately represent and connect with these powerful segments. In doing so, you’re not only pleasing consumers – you’re taking a strategic approach to be Culturally Fluent.

Authentic representation of one segment doesn’t come at the cost of resonance with other segments. In fact, genuine cultural signals are what resonates. Even if the cues aren’t personally relatable, the recognition of authenticity is priceless. An accurate portrayal of one segment is a way to position your brand as trustworthy and respected by all consumers.

Collage Group’s 2020 research initiatives dive deep into family values, attitudes, and behaviors to distinguish variations across segments and uncover authentic details. Keep reading for high-level segment takeaways and download the deck for more, including family profiles by segment.

1. Which consumers value the role of song, music and dance in the family?

About a third of Hispanic and Black Americans value the role of song, music, and dance in the family. These activities are ways to bond with one another and are also likely to be present at family gatherings.

For instance, Oreo acknowledges the lively nature of Hispanic American families with a relevant portrayal of the importance of song and dance in family life. Their recent spot features Latin pop singer Becky G video-chatting her brother. They connect over a shared love of music – and Oreos – as they sing and dance over the phone with her extended family in the background.

Our CultureRate:Ad research shows that this ad successfully represents the Hispanic experience of the universal Group Trait of Family, while simultaneously resonating across segments (including White viewers). The music-and-dance-filled ad did exceptionally well with the Hispanic segment, with an A-CFQ score of 81 (+6 points above the resonance threshold of 75), as well as the Black segment (A-CFQ score of 74). But the power of authentically representing the Hispanic family was appreciated by other segments, too, with A-CFQ scores of 73 for the Asian segment and 72 for the White segment. Even though the ad was in Spanish, consumers recognize and appreciate the cultural cues of singing and dancing as relevant to Hispanic families.

2. How do Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian American consumers value family?

Both segments like to make their families proud and live in accordance with familial expectations. They also tend to be especially loyal to their families and prize their input when making decisions.

This spot by Chase leans into Asian Americans’ desire to please their elders. A son is learning to make noodles from scratch, and along the way seeks guidance from his mother and approval from his grandmother.

3. How often do multicultural consumers spend time with family?

Multicultural Americans tend to have more relatives and be closer to distant relatives than White Americans. Moreover, Hispanic and Black segments spend more time with their relatives and are more likely to build close relationships with them than White Americans are.

Connect across segments through this common value and illustrate how your brand can strengthen family ties. For instance, a recent Christmas spot by Etsy shows a Black family gathered for the holiday. The son’s new boyfriend joins the celebration, but feels intimidated by all the relatives, until they warmly “welcome him to the family” with a personalized gift.

For more insights on the study, download an excerpt of the sample above. Learn more about membership, custom research and more by filling out the form below. 

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“Community” Means More for Multicultural Consumers

“Community” Means More for Multicultural Consumers

Collage research identifies community as a powerful space where all consumer segments engage with the universal Group Trait of Connection. Here’s what brands and marketers need to know about community across race and ethnicity.

Fill out the form to download a sample of the study.

Human beings are social by nature. No matter our background, we all crave connection. We build community around the things we hold in common, and we spend our lives surrounded by others whose company we enjoy and trust.

But what your own community looks like depends on many factors. Do you seek out community with your neighbors? Or with those who share your faith? Or your cultural heritage? Or is it something else, entirely, which makes you feel connected with others?

Getting these questions right is essential for marketers trying to authentically represent and resonate with multicultural consumer segments. Collage research confirms that community matters to pretty much everyone, but our data also reveals how community is experienced and expressed differently across cultural backgrounds.

In our 2020 Roundtable Study, we learned that multicultural Americans, especially Black and Hispanic consumers, want to see communities that look like their own represented in advertising.

Moreover, it is within their communities that these segments discuss and evaluate marketing executions.

In other words, people do indeed share and discuss what they like and don’t like about advertising within their community.  The importance of this insight cannot be overstated, especially for Black and Hispanic consumers.  These segments are far more likely to talk about your ads, even if their respective racial/ethnic background isn’t the focus of the advertisement at hand!

To activate on the shared value of community connection, brands must therefore understand the power of authentically representing community across multicultural and other segments.

For most brands, the authentic representation of community and family offers pure upside: not only does it result in increased activation of the target group, it also resonates with other segments, who are drawn to the authentic representation of segments, even if not their own .

Read on for high-level takeaways and download the deck for more, including community profiles by race/ethnicity.

1. Black and Hispanic Americans Feel Most Connected to Their Racial/Ethnic Communities.

Hispanic consumers – especially within the Unacculturated Hispanic segment – have the strongest connection, with 76 percent feeling either “very” or “somewhat” connected to the broader Hispanic community. Asian consumers, on the other hand, feel a weaker connection to a broader Asian community, with only 58 percent feeling either “very” or “somewhat” connected. Given the important distinctions within the Asian segment based on country of origin, it makes sense that these consumers feel weaker affiliation with a sense of generalized Asian American identity.

2. Hispanic and Black Americans Lean More Heavily on Religion as Part of their Daily Lives.

While most Americans do ascribe to a religious tradition – with Christianity holding a plurality across racial/ethnic segments – only 1 in 5 adult consumers say they participate in a church group or other religious organization. The Hispanic segment, though, sees a higher rate of religious participation, at 25 percent. Black consumers are also more likely to have strong connections with their religious and spiritual communities, being most likely (19%) to turn to them for emotional support.

3. All Multicultural Segments Feel a Stronger Connection to their Neighborhoods and Cities.

Most Americans – including white consumers – identify strongly with the places they live. But Hispanic, Black, and Asian consumers all feel stronger connections to their neighborhoods or towns/cities. It is therefore essential to emphasize the role local communities play in daily life when trying to reach and resonate with multicultural America.

Across these three insights, and the others presented in the attached slides, there is a clear pattern: multicultural segments tend to be more connected with their communities.

White consumers are simply less engaged with community networks, whether geographic, online, spiritual, or cultural. To reach and resonate with multicultural America, brands and marketers must see these consumers not only as individuals, but also as members of vital and vibrant communities.

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Understanding Hispanic Consumer Preferences for Food & Dining

Understanding Hispanic Consumer Preferences for Food & Dining
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Is your brand effectively appealing to the culinary and dining preferences and passions of Hispanic consumers? Food plays an important role in cultural identity among Hispanics. It combines historic flavors with current trends, creating a source of cultural pride and connection.

In our webinar, Hispanic Passions for Food & Dining, we highlight key findings on Hispanic American food preferences and passions, calling out six key insights:

  1. Food is the #1 passion point for Hispanic consumers.
  2. Two in five consumers are strict healthy eaters.
  3. Hispanics are more skeptical of packaged foods, especially frozen foods.
  4. When it comes to prepared or fast food, Hispanics prefer convenience over fresh, but stick with authenticity.
  5. Hispanic Americans are more likely to choose less sugary options.
  6. Hispanics, like Asians, place high value on authentic cooking.

Fill out the form to learn more in the webinar replay.

We had a lot of great questions from webinar attendees and called upon our food experts to provide a deeper explanation. Director of Product and Content Bryan Miller and Senior Analyst Connor Wahrman weigh in below.

What do you think makes food a top passion point for Hispanic consumers?

Bryan: Some of our newest research further confirms that many Hispanics in the U.S. tend to be experience-seeking. Food is an area where we see this appear frequently. Further, for many Hispanics, food is a way to connect with culture and heritage. This does vary a bit by acculturation; a more detailed breakdown is available in our member platform. Importantly, most segments see food as a top passion point, except younger segments. For example, in Gen Z consumers we’ve seen more functional in eating habits/preferences.

Are Hispanic consumers interested in food delivery services: UberEats, Instacart, Amazon Fresh, etc.? Do they see these services as more convenient? Less fresh?

Connor: Our research shows that Hispanic consumers are most likely to integrate technology into their shopping. They use mobile devices to aid in in-store shopping and are most interested in curbside pickup services and secure drop-off locations.

Do you have suggestions on how to position my brand to leverage experiential eating, particularly during the pandemic?

Bryan: Try highlighting new and interesting ways that your product can be used… Think about sharing recipes online and/or promoted through social media. People are at home, online more, and cooking more; give them an excuse to try something new with your products.

Connor: Also, consider shifting the focus from “exciting eating” to “authentic cooking” experiences. Work to identify ways to make authentic, fresh food more accessible to consumers through DIY opportunities. For example, do for food/cooking what Netflix is doing with “watch parties.”

With the current economic system, how are Hispanic food purchasing behaviors/preferences impacted?

Connor: Hispanic consumers are most price-sensitive when it comes to food products compared to other segments, so they are most willing to sacrifice quality and brand loyalty considerations as economic conditions continue to stagnate/decline.

What are the key differences by generation? Is there anything that stands out for Gen Z, specifically?

Bryan: In general, we see Gen Z (especially younger Gen Z) tending to be more functional eaters. We suspect this is an age effect and that the attitudes will shift as they age. Shifts will likely stem from beginning to cook more, having more choice about what they eat (right now parents may be choosing), and having more disposable income.

Fill out the form above to access the webinar replay and contact us with additional questions, or for more information about our syndicated online research and custom capabilities.

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Personal Care

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Personal Brands: Fenty Beauty
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Which beauty brands appeal to multicultural consumers?

Our most recent CultureRate:Brand study shows how young multicultural segments rank Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty, which accumulated nearly $570 million in revenue within 15 months of launching in late 2017. Now worth $17 billion, Fenty Beauty reigns as one of the most gender and skin-tone inclusive makeup brands on the market.

Did Fenty Beauty receive a high B-CFQ ranking among multicultural consumers?

The table below shows the percent of each segment that agrees with each of the six components (Relevance and Trust, for example) of our Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ). We see trends both across segment lines (rows) and across specific components (columns). Acculturated, bicultural, and Black consumers over-index on five of the six components, while White consumers under-index on four of six components.

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Brands that receive a high-ranking B-CFQ scorecard are considered to be culturally fluent, and are more likely than other brands to sustain continuous market growth. Low-ranking B-CFQ scorecards reveal new opportunities for brands to strengthen resonance with young multicultural consumers.

If you’re interested in measuring the cultural fluency of your brand, please fill out the contact form below. 

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