Posts

Engage Small Business Owners in America

,
Engage Small Business Owners in America
Small businesses drive the American economy and their owners reflect the diverse cultures and perspectives of Americans. Read on for more information about how to connect with small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

April 15, 2022
Jack Mackinnon – Director, Product and Content

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 6 million of those companies have at least one paid employee. At the helm of all that economic heft is an owner who tends to be highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions of the business. As a result, small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owners’ identity (collective and by sub-segment), future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study and download the deck for the full picture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Engage Small Business Owners in America presentation.

Key Insight #1: Identity

Small business owners, especially Hispanic, Black, and Asian American small business owners, describe themselves as being innovative, driven, and community-oriented. There is also a sense of shared culture among minority small business owners and a strong connection between Black small business owners and the communities where their businesses operate.

Implication:

Small Business Owners see themselves as innovative, driven, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2: Outlook

Small business owners are confident that their business prospects are going to continue to improve over the next year. Hispanic and Black owners are especially optimistic about how their businesses are performing compared to last year and will perform into the next.

Implication:

Harness the positivity! Even though this hasn’t been an easy year, recognize Multicultural Small Business Owners’ positive sentiment and match it in your communications.

Key Insight #3: Operations

Small Business Owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to small business owners, themselves. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4: Support and Partnerships

Small Business Owners, especially multicultural owners, are looking for specific expertise in the areas of marketing, networking, and financing.

Implication:

Provide Small Business Owners assistance in marketing, networking, and finance via digital tools.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jack McKinnon

Jack Mackinnon
Director, Product and Content

Jack Mackinnon is a new addition to the Collage Group syndicated research team. He brings consumer insight expertise across Multicultural, Generations, and LGBTQ+ segments.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality

,
Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality
Young Multicultural Americans are committed to racial equality in the U.S. today and are demanding brands do their part by speaking out and supporting people who look like them. Read on to learn three ways your brand can engage younger Multicultural Americans on this key issue.

Americans’ Awareness about racism and race-relations in the U.S. is at an all-time high. The racial reckoning of 2020, the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes, and the heightened awareness around Hispanic immigration to America has disproportionately affected Multicultural Americans who call the U.S. home.

Fill out the form for more details on the research and read on for key insights and implications:

In our recent America Now study, we looked at the total population and their perceptions around racism and other major issues happening in America today.

Younger Americans (aged 18-40 years old at the end of 2021) tend to be more Multicultural and they embrace diversity in their professional, personal and even consumer lives. Given their distinct profile we wanted to better understand younger Multicultural Americans’ perspectives towards combatting racial injustice. This is an issue brands can take a stand on, and it turns out, that is what Multicultural Americans want.

Our study found that young Multicultural Americans see their race and ethnicity as an increasingly important part of their identity. Many also believe that negative stereotypes exist simply because of what they look like, and that the media often mispresents Americans of their race and ethnicity, which can propagate negative stereotypes.

To address negative stereotypes and misrepresentation in the media, younger Multicultural Americans believe brands need to take bold action. They want them to speak out against racism.

And they want brands to actively support people who match their own race and ethnicity.

Our research shows us there are three key steps brands can take when it comes to engaging the younger Multicultural consumer in the fight for racial equality.

1) Ensure authentic representation

Ensuring authentic representation goes beyond including Multicultural people in ads. Younger Multicultural Americans want authentic portrayals that include what their families and communities are like as well as accurate portrayals of their life values. They also want brands to help break down the negative stereotypes they have experienced too often.

2) Pick a side

Picking a side includes, but is not limited to, making public statements in the fight for racial justice. It means that in addition to statements, brands will act, whether through financial donations or putting pressure on the government to enact local or national change that supports the cause.

3) Lead from within

Lastly, younger Multicultural Americans want brands to lead from within their own organizations by diversifying internally, committing to a more diverse leadership pipeline, and providing better training to address racial bias. Walking the walk means something to these Americans.

So what can you do to help your brand showcase your commitment to racial justice in America?

Some important next steps:

  1. Go beyond one-dimensional representation in your advertising to capture the totality of Multicultural consumers.
  2. Share efforts your brand or company has taken in the fight for racial equality widely with your audience.
  3. Conduct an internal audit to understand the company’s strengths and weaknesses in the areas of diversity and inclusion. Share positive results widely as well as an improvement plan.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity

, , , ,
Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity
Collage Group Launches Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program

American consumer attitudes continue to evolve, and to help you keep pace, Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce our new Parents & Kids Program as part of our leading Cultural Intelligence Platform. This new offering, created with input from nearly a dozen Collage members, is designed to cover the insights marketing and consumer insights professionals need to engage and activate parents and kids across race and ethnicity. Based on our scoping, there is no other syndicated resource available that offers full coverage of parents and kids with race and ethnicity overlays.

Fill out the form below for more details on the new program, including reporting breakouts and content.

Why focus on Parents & Kids?

Demographic change amplifies the need to effectively resonate with America’s diverse parents and their children. In fact, the generations most likely to have children are between 5 and 12 percent more racially and ethnically diverse than older generations.

And, multicultural Americans are 10% more likely to have children under 18 living in their households.

Household with Children Under 18 Present Average Household Size
40% Hispanic
3.4 Hispanic
34% Asian
3.0 Asian
27% Black
2.6 Black
23% White
2.4 White

For many brands, the age of kids is also especially important given the development of decision-making processes–our research will dig deeper into this area. From birth to age 3 children are largely dependent on parental decision-making. As children age, they develop more capacity to make their own decisions.

What’s included in the Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program?

Starting this spring, our new Parents & Kids Program will unveil how culture impacts the roles that moms and dads play in their children’s lives, with insights including:

    • the parenting style(s) they embrace
    • the values they prioritize instilling in their kids
    • how they navigate the impact of the changing media landscape and shifting social norms on their children

The Program also provides insight into how the culture, age and gender of the child impacts parental attitudes and behaviors, including:

    • how they respond to their children’s preferences and desires
    • how they select products and services for their kids across category
    • when and how they “hand-off” decision-making to their kids across category

Collage Group is committed to conducting specific research on both parents and kids to provide unparalleled insights, as many brands have a significant gap in their understanding of the way culture impacts parenting and the parent-child decision-making process. We hope you’ll find value in this new research.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

How Americans Feel About the Olympic Games

, , ,
How Americans Feel About the Olympic Games
People around the world will soon be captivated by the spectacle of the 2022 Winter Olympics. Read on for Insights on how multicultural Americans experience and follow the Olympics curated from our 2021 Holidays and Occasions research.
 

On February 4th the 2022 Winter Olympics will officially begin in Beijing, China. While these Olympics will look different than past competitions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and a diplomatic boycott by countries including the United States, Australia, Britain, and Canada, millions of people around the world will still tune in to see their nations’ best athletes compete in skiing, skating, and more.

American’s attitudes and habits surrounding the Olympics often differ by race and ethnicity. For example, almost two-thirds of Black, Asian, and White Americans say that watching the Olympics makes them feel proud to be American, but this figure is closer to half of Hispanic Americans. When investigating deeper into acculturation-level data, we see that only about 4 in 10 Unacculturated Hispanic Americans feel a sense of patriotism during the Olympics, while Acculturated Hispanic Americans are closer to the other segments at 62%. Since Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely to be immigrants to the United States, they may have an additional rooting interest in their home countries during the Olympics.

Most Americans Say the Olympic Games Give Sense of Pride

Cultural duality is at the forefront of many Hispanic Americans’ identities and manifests elsewhere in their feelings about the Olympics. Hispanic Americans are the most likely of any racial or ethnic segment to see the Olympics as a great occasion to build unity among different countries. And these attitudes make them more likely to consume Olympics content as well. Sixty-eight percent of Hispanic Americans say they watch sports during the Olympics they otherwise wouldn’t watch, which is higher than all other groups and significantly higher than White Americans.

Hispanic Audiences View More Sports Only During Olympic Games

Understanding the Hispanic community’s love of the Olympics and desire to have content in Spanish, NBC and its subsidiary Telemundo aired over 300 hours of Spanish-language events during the 2020 Summer Olympics, specifically featuring soccer, basketball, baseball, and volleyball. They also sent famous Hispanic sports figures to the Olympics in Tokyo to provide live commentary.

Multicultural Audiences and the Olympic Games

Advertising around the Olympics can be tricky due to the International Olympic Committee’s strict rules around using their copyrighted logos and trademarks. It’s even trickier this time around, as China is being accused of human rights abuses that have led to several diplomatic boycotts and calls for existing advertisers to drop out as well. Regardless of the host country, the Olympics are a chance for athletes who have worked their entire lives on their sports to show off their skills. Focusing on them and their incredible achievements could be a great way to invoke the sense of American pride and unity that many report feeling during the Games.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to diverse consumer insights in our cultural intelligence platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

How Americans Celebrate the Lunar New Year

,
How Americans Celebrate the Lunar New Year
As we enter the Year of the Tiger, learn how Asian American consumers prepare for and celebrate Lunar New Year. Read on for insights curated from our 2021 Holidays & Occasions research.
 

This Lunar New Year begins on February 1st and will say goodbye to the year of the Ox and hello to the year of the Tiger. Lunar New Year marks the beginning of the calendar year for cultures whose months are moon-cycles and notes the transition between different zodiac signs. Celebrations in 2022 will last from February 1st to February 15th. While Lunar New Year is often referred to as Chinese New Year, it is important to note that Non-Chinese cultures that celebrate New Year do not necessarily refer to their holiday as Chinese New Year. For example, South Korean Americans often celebrate Korean New Year and Vietnamese Americans celebrate Tet. Regardless of how they refer to the holiday, almost half of Asian Americans we surveyed told us they celebrate Lunar New Year!

This holiday is really about time with the family and is usually celebrated with having special foods or drinks. Gifting money in red or white envelopes is also a key part of the occasion, generally given from adult to children to pass on a year of good fortune and blessings.

Another key part of this holiday is the climactic ending, through the Lantern Festival. Activities that are part of the Festival include lion and dragon dancing, stilt-walkers, and eating rice balls.

While Asian Americans are split on whether brands should activate on Lunar New Year, very few believe that they should never do it.

If brands do market or advertise about Chinese or Lunar New Year, Asian Americans — especially those who are Chinese and Vietnamese — want them to explain what the holiday is about and why it is important. Sharing stories of people celebrating the holiday, showing how to support Asian Americans and the issues this segment faces, and what people can do to celebrate the holiday also rank quite high.

So what should your brand do if you want to market during the Chinese or Lunar New Year?

  1. Build awareness of what Lunar New Year is and why it is importantPanda Express did just this through an ad campaign in 2021 that taught a young child the important traditions that make up this holiday.
  2. Highlight how your brand supports Lunar New Year through increased representation of the components that make this holiday special (e.g., food, décor). Target offers a great example of this by highlighting Jing Gao on their website. Jing Gao is the Founder and CEO of Fly By Jing and is bringing Chinese flavors to American households. Her brand is now available at Target.
  3. Include Lunar New Year as part of a larger promotion of holidays and occasions celebrated by multicultural consumers. American Girl has done this through their recently released celebration outfits which includes Lunar New Year, Kwanzaa, Diwali, Eid al-Fitr, and Hannukah.

Learn more about our Holidays & Occasions work and contact us via the form below to access deeper insights on our cultural intelligence platforms.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Most Americans (58%) Want Businesses to Engage in Social and Political Issues

,
Most Americans (58%) Want Businesses to Engage in Social and Political Issues

One in Four Gen Z Consumers Will Stop Buying from Brands That Do Not Take a Stance on an Important Issue

November 10th, 2021
Mollie Turner – Senior Director of Marketing

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

American consumers are experiencing a second year of unprecedented change, giving 2020 solid competition for an emerging set of challenges for U.S. businesses. Political polarization, COVID-19, race relations, immigration, LGBTQ+ rights and climate change have been top of mind for consumers this year–leading to shifts in consumer expectations of businesses.

“Most Americans want brands to engage in social and political issues,” says David Wellisch, Collage Group CEO and Co-Founder. “The numbers are even more striking when we look by specific issues. For example, 85% of Americans want brands to play a role in ending the COVID-19 pandemic and alleviating its impact. And, then there’s the stick—we see younger Americans, bicultural Hispanics, and Black Americans are much more willing to penalize brands for non-action on issues they see as important.”

These are just a few of the many datapoints on shifts in American consumer behaviors since 2020 available in Collage Group’s America Now: How We Have Changed Since 2020 report. Research led by Chief Insights Officer David Evans, Senior Director of Product & Content Bryan Miller, PhD, and Director of Product & Content Jack Mackinnon, unveils changes to diverse consumer attitudes at a key juncture in American history. The results come from a survey fielded in September 2021 of 3,785 Americans, representing Americans across race, ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender.

Fill out the form to view a recording and download a sample from our research presentation, Multicultural America Now.

Multicultural America Now

Key insights illuminated in the research include:

  1. Most Americans (58%) Want Brands to Engage in Social and Political Issues
      • Stopping COVID-19, improving race relations and halting climate change are the top three social and political issues consumers want brands to support.
      • The majority (85%) of Americans want brands to play a role in ending the COVID-19 pandemic and alleviating its impact.
      • The majority (59%) of Americans believe corporations bear the responsibility of fighting climate change – not individuals.
      • The majority (55%) of consumers across all generations acknowledge the urgency of taking action on climate change.
  2. Race and Ethnicity is the #1 Way Multicultural Americans Self-Identify, Regardless of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, or Sexuality­
      • Race and Hispanic ethnicity are the most common self-descriptors for multicultural Americans, ranking higher than personality, age/life stage, country of origin, being American, sexuality, gender and more.
      • Multicultural Americans report an increased interest in buying from brands that support people of their racial and ethnic background—an ~11% increase on average in 2021 comes on top of a 2020 baseline of ~52% of consumers.
  3. Empathetic Gen Z Support Black and LGBTQ+ Americans Much More Than Older Generations (+15%)
      • The majority of Gen Z consumers wants brands to support women (56%) and Black Americans (55%).
      • Inaction is risky for brands with younger consumers, as 26% of Gen Z would stop using or buying a brand if it did not take a stance on an important issue.
  4. COVID-19 Worries Remain for Two-Thirds of Americans, and Their Concern Is Tied Primarily to Economic Factors (64%)
      • Nearly two-thirds of Americans are still concerned about COVID-19, with Asian Americans feeling the most concern at 72%, up 4% since 2020.
      • Most Americans (64%) are concerned they may not have enough money to keep up with monthly expenses; Hispanic Americans are the most concerned with 3 in 4 (74%) citing the concern.
  5. Many Multicultural Americans Have Reprioritized What Matters Most to Them vs. One Year Ago
      • Multicultural Americans say being happy and healthy (41%), saving money (33%) and supporting family and community (27%) are now their top priorities.
      • The majority (54%) of Hispanic Americans say being healthy and happy is much more important to them today than it was one year ago.

“Engaging authentically with an increasingly diverse America can be hard, and missteps are easy,” says David Wellisch. “But our research illustrates that not engaging is not an option, especially during challenging times. This is consumer expectation.”

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

Other Recent Gen Z Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Mollie Turner

Mollie Turner
Senior Director of Marketing

Mollie Turner is the Senior Director of Marketing at Collage Group where she leads growth, engagement and brand initiatives. She is a seasoned marketing and communications executive, with 20 years of experience spanning B2B, non-profit and agency roles across various industries.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

It’s not too late to activate! With two thirds of Indian Americans celebrating Diwali, brands will want to make their mark on this important holiday. Keep reading to learn what Asian consumers expect from brands like yours on this festival of lights.

Diwali is one of the major festivals celebrated among Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and many Buddhists. The holiday lasts five days, and it coincides with the Hindu New Year according to their lunisolar calendar. Though it falls on November 4 this year, Diwali has some similarities to other winter and New Year’s celebrations, and comes with distinct cultural traditions.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how Asian American consumers celebrate, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is Diwali?

Diwali honors the conclusion of the Ramayana, a key Hindu text and one of two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India. It celebrates the triumphant return of Prince Rama after a 14-year exile, the rescue of his wife Sita, and his coronation as king. Rejoicing in Rama’s victories, Diwali celebrants honor light itself amidst the darkness of coming winter.  And for many Asian Americans, Diwali is an explicitly religious holiday, with the Goddess Lakshmi – symbolizing wealth and purity – a key focus.

Traditions of Diwali​

    • Candles and firecrackers are popular in Diwali celebrations, with diya oil lamps one of the more traditional means of proving light in the darkness
    • Rangoli is an art form common in Diwali preparations, where colored sand, flower petals, rocks, and powdered stone are arranged in colorful, patterned designs on a flat surface
    • Sweet foods are a traditional component of Diwali celebrations, with many preparing malpua pancakes, laddu balls, and other fare to eat and share
    • Puja is a worship ritual common among Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains. On Diwali, offerings of light, flowers, sustenance, or song accompany these rituals, largely directed towards the Goddess Lakshmi

Among Indian Americans, having special food and drink is the most common way to celebrate Diwali. Eating and gifting sweets is therefore a key component of American Diwali, but many other customs – including fireworks, clothing, decorations, and religious ceremonies – are also popular.

Key Consumer Insights

According to Collage Group’s 2021 Holidays and Occasions study, 13% of the Asian American population celebrates Diwali, with 67% of Indian Americans making up the bulk of celebrants. Diwali therefore has a niche, but dedicated market.

Which means many brands may be wondering if they have permission to play.

Among Indian Americans, brands largely have a green light to focus on education. Most Indian Americans say brands should use their Diwali activations to explain what the holiday is and why it’s important, given that half of Americans – and 42% of Asian Americans – are not familiar with the festival at all. And Many Indian Americans also support brands sharing stories of people observing the holiday, as well as showing others what they can do to help celebrate.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Four Group Traits That Best Characterize Asian American Consumers

Four Cultural Traits That Best Characterize Asian American Consumers
Collage Group’s latest consumer report on Asian Cultural Traits provides powerful new insights into this critically important demographic. Fill out the form to download an excerpt specific to the expertise-seeking cultural trait.
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

The Asian American segment is the fastest-growing racial/ethnic segment in the United States today. By 2060, Collage Group projects the Asian segment will almost double in size to 36 million people—roughly 9% of the total U.S. population. To capture this growth, brands and marketers must deepen their understanding of the Asian consumer segment.

Fill out the form to view a sample from our research on consumer attitudes and behaviors around Unique Asian American Cutural Traits.

Which Cultural Traits best characterize Asian Consumers?

The four Group Traits that best characterize the Asian segment areCultural Duality, Conventionality, Reservedness, and Expertise-Seeking.

1. Cultural Duality

Cultural Duality captures the feeling of being both “American” and simultaneously identifying with another culture or heritage.

Individuals exhibiting this Group Trait constantly find new ways to both keep old traditions alive and redefine American culture in their own image. Both Asian and Hispanic Americans strongly exhibit this group trait.

While Asian Americans strongly believe in upholding the traditions of their countries of origin, they also feel a connection with American culture. This embrace of multiple aspects of their backgrounds leads to cultural fluidity – the ability to seamlessly navigate multiple cultural spheres – and a unique Asian American identity.

For Asian Americans, Cultural Duality is more than a feeling, it’s an active commitment to continue their traditions. Through food, holidays, religion, family connection, and more, Asian Americans are significantly more likely than non-Asians to report they still actively practice the traditions of their family’s heritage.

2. Conventionality

People sharing the Group Trait of Conventionality tend to aspire to tried-and-true lifestyles and ideas of what people should be doing in their general situations.

Concepts like “living the American Dream” will likely hold more sway with these individuals than anything positioned as part of an “alternative lifestyle.”

Asian Americans desire and pursue conventional lives marked by advanced education, stable jobs, marriage, and children. While this desire is weaker in younger Asian Americans, it continues to set the segment apart and manifest as an interest in traditional forms of success. The drive for conventionality comes from the desires to make one’s family proud and fit in with others.

Asians are significantly more likely than non-Asians to agree with the statement, “the way I live my life is mainly in line with what’s normal and expected for most people.” Asian Americans are also significantly less likely than other segments to report wanting to live unconventionally. This doesn’t mean they don’t aspire to success, but rather that they aspire to traditional successes like higher education and home ownership.

3. Reservedness

People exhibiting the Group Trait of Reservedness tend to be more private, and less likely to express what makes them unique, special, or otherwise interesting.

This does not mean they have nothing to say or lead boring lives; rather, they are simply content keeping these things to themselves.

Asian Americans are less likely than other segments to share their inner selves, including their thoughts, opinions, and feelings. This attitude stems from the emphasis on humility and self-effacement common in collectivist societies. However, younger Asian Americans, especially those raised in the United States, are embracing the outgoing and gregarious character often associated with Americans.

The instinct to go with the flow and keep thoughts to themselves can be linked to the collectivist tendencies of many Asian cultures. Asian Americans’ collectivism, which values the good of the many over the individual, sometimes manifests in a reluctance to say or do potentially inflammatory things with the goal to preserve peace in a situation.

4. Expertise-Seeking

People sharing this Group Trait look to experts – or sources of expertise – for advice.

Whether from certified professionals or the people they know who are more experienced on a subject, these individuals are more likely to seek out external sources of information before making important decisions.

Asian Americans, across country of origin, are focused on making sound decisions to ensure promising futures. This includes openness to both input from actual experts (physicians, financial advisors, etc.), as well as input from peers on topics of interest. Members of the segment often seek peer input to stay abreast of the latest trends.

Similar to the previous Group Trait of Reservedness, the collectivist attitudes of Asian Americans influence their tendency to trust experts. Collectivism requires self-effacement and humility, which results in the belief that you alone do not know what’s best and that you should seek advice before making big or small decisions.

Fill out the form below to learn how we can help your brand win with Asian consumers.

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

Other Recent Asian Consumer Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Four Things You Need to Know About Asian American Marketing

Four Things You Need to Know about Asian-American Consumers

Asian American consumers are one of the fastest growing segments in the U.S. Here are four cultural facts your brand needs to know in order to win their marketshare.

1. Almost two-thirds of Asian Americans are foreign-born, and roughly 80% speak a language other than English at home.

But this doesn’t mean you have to use targeted language-specific advertising to reach the segment. After all, more than 74% of each major Asian sub-group (Indian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipino, Korean, Japanese) is either bilingual or English dominant.

2. Roughly half of all Asian Americans cite China or India as their country of origin.

And these two groups were responsible for 71% of the Asian segment’s population growth between 2012 and 2017—1.8 million people!

3. Marriage is extremely important for Asian Americans.

They are the most likely to be married and the least likely to be divorced.  Among origin groups, Indian Asians are the most likely to be married, while Asian women are the most likely of any group to be in an interracial marriage.

4. While Asian Americans take pride in their Asian ethnicity, they tend to identify more by their country of origin.

This is likely tied to the segment’s desire to maintain a strong connection with their cultural heritage, something many Asians—roughly 48%—fear future generations may lose.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Marketers Need to Rethink How to Mix Multicultural Themes and American Cues in Advertising

, , , ,

As advertising approaches a tipping point in the need to appeal across multiple demographics, marketers are asking “what really works across the wide spectrum of identity that is America today?” Our analysis of ads unpacks the conundrum and reveals some startling insights.