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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points

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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Black American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Black Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Powerful Memories Are Made in the Kitchen

Black Americans feel at home cooking and baking in their kitchens.

Context:

Many Black Americans grew up in the kitchen learning how to cook from older family members. They see preparing a meal as time to spend with family, create memories, and express love and care for others through food.

Action Step:

Portray cooking and baking as a full family (plus friends) activity and emphasize the real motivator for Black Americans’ enjoyment making food at home: relationships.

Key Finding #2: Black Travelers Welcome Discomfort

Black Americans are more likely than others to travel to get out of their comfort zone, but they prefer to do so domestically in the U.S.

Context:

Historically, prejudice followed Black Americans along with them on trips. But now, the Greenbook has evolved into influencers and Black consumers’ Group Traits of Determined, Real, Believing, and Forward-thinking merge to make this segment uniquely optimistic and adventurous travelers.

Action Step:

Boost Black Americans’ excitement for U.S. locations and weave local interests into your travel messaging.

Key Finding #3: Black Athletes Are Leaders In and Out of Their Sport

Black Americans are dedicated sports fans who follow their favorite teams, as well as the careers of specific athletes.

Context:

Black athletes have served as American heroes for Black sports fans (and all sports fans) for decades. As a result of that earned trust and influence, Black athletes have often refused to “stick to sports” and have weighed in on important social and politics issues that matter to the Black community. Since 2020, this trend has only ramped up with athletes like Lebron James, Serena Williams, Colin Kaepernick, Maya Moore, and others speaking up for equality.

Action Step:

Recognize the influence and social/political clout of Black athletes and partner with them on marketing efforts.

Key Finding #4: Fashion is a Vehicle for Black Self-Expression

Black Americans are uniquely passionate about fashion. They consider themselves trendsetters and enjoy expressing their personalities with style.

Context:

Self expression is an essential element of Black Americans’ lives. In fact, they are more likely to see themselves as unique, unabashed, and authentic than others. For many Black Americans, individuality is something to be celebrated across all aspects of life.

Action Step:

When you’re engaging Black consumers, de-emphasize uniformity and function in favor of fashion’s fun and uncommon side.

Key Finding #5: Black Americans Embrace the “Gamer” Identity

Black Americans love to play video games and even are self-proclaimed “gamers.”

Context:

For Black Americans, video games are a vehicle for some of the things they value most: connecting with their friends and family, self-expression, and personal achievement.

Action Step:

Resist the urge to see video games as just a “game.” Instead, emphasize the bigger motivators for why Black Americans love them: social connection, individuality, and skill-building.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Black Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
Analyst

Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Asian American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 1, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Asian Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Asian Americans Are Passionate about Cooking and Cook Meals to Maintain Cultural Traditions

Asian Americans rely on cooking and baking to maintain their cultural traditions.

Context:

Cooking traditional recipes connects Asian Americans with their cultural backgrounds. Food is a central part of their community and the places they are from, and they want to honor that in the kitchen.

Action Step:

    • In advertising, highlight Asian Americans love for traditional meals and cooking either subtly or overtly.
    • Offer examples of how your brand can help Asian Americans keep their love for traditional meals alive.

Key Finding #2: Asian Travelers Enjoy Overseas Adventures

Asian Americans love to travel internationally both to connect with their heritage and to have new cultural experiences.

Context:

Two thirds of Asian Americans are foreign born, and the other third are very likely to be second generation Americans. Their relatively recent immigration stories mean they are likely to still have personal and emotional connections with their country of origin. Traveling internationally helps them to connect with their heritage.

Asian Americans are also inquisitive, and they like to travel to experience new foods and different cultures than their own.

Action Step:

    • Engage with Asian American travelers by emphasizing the personal connections they have across global locations.
    • Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.
    • Stimulate Asian American’s curiosity for different cultures and lifestyles by inspiring them to create new memories abroad.

Key Finding #3: Asian Americans Share a Unique Passion for Fitness and Exercise

Asian Americans lead the multicultural segment in having a passion for fitness and exercise, especially walking and doing yoga. They over-index on the use of multiple types of gyms and gym equipment.

Context:

Asian Americans consistently prioritize their health and fitness because they are health focused. They choose a variety of ways to be active but similar to most Americans, walking wins. That’s probably because it’s pretty easy to do!

Action Step:

    • Help Asian Americans understand how your brand can be a part of their healthy lifestyle.

Key Finding #4: Younger Asian Americans Express Themselves Through Fashion

Younger Asian Americans see fashion as a way to express their individuality.

Context:

Asian Americans aren’t afraid to make fashion choices that are bold and unique. They are pioneers in streetwear culture because of the ways they can express themselves through their clothing and accessories. Streetwear also means comfortable clothing, something else that Asian Americans prefer in their fashion!

Action Step:

    • Show how your brand can make Asian Americans feel comfortable while still staying true to themselves and expressing who they are.

Key Finding #5: Asian Americans are Analytical Gamers

Asian Americans share an interest in analog and digital strategic thinking games.

Context:

Asian Americans are analytical and like to think about their options before making decisions. Games that require thinking before making a final decision (e.g., word games or crossword puzzles, chess) provide an example of their analytical mindset.

Action Step:

    • Capture the attention of Asian Americans by focusing on strategic thinking games or highlighting them playing these types of games in your advertising.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Asian Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Senior Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities that get people excited. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Food Is for Socializing

LGBTQ+ Americans love to share their food experience (IRL and online) with other people.

Context:

LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to value being hospitable and congenial with others. They’re also more likely to “consider someone ‘family’ if we are really close, even if we’re not related.” So, sharing experiences with others is a central part of their daily lives.

The LGBTQ+ segment also skews young, so social media and digital communications are second nature. That extends to using those mediums to consume and share pictures, videos, and information about food and meals.

Action Step:

    • Celebrate meals. When representing LGBTQ+ Americans and their food experiences, remember to highlight the social aspects of making food and eating together.
    • Feed LGBTQ+ Americans’ feeds with digital food content. Recipes, inspiration, influencers, and food events are all of interest for these “foodies.”

Key Finding #2: LGBTQ+ Travelers Seek Adventure

LGBTQ+ Americans of all ages and younger non-LGBTQ+ Americans enjoy getting out of their comfort zone when they travel.

Context:

While finding travel locations welcoming of LGBTQ+ travelers is important, LGBTQ+ Americans also love to explore new cultures and enjoy new experiences. They’re unique Group Trait of Worldly highlights their penchant to be open-minded, cosmopolitan and experiential.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize new and the exciting travel opportunities for LGBTQ+ Americans. The world is big and interesting; Help them discover it.

Key Finding #3: Video Game Fandom Provides Community for the LGBTQ+ Segment

Younger LGBTQ+ Americans uniquely love video games and see them as a vehicle for self-expression and socializing.

Context: LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely than others to value being unique and creative. The segment also prioritizes happiness and fun in their lives. It’s no doubt, then, why LGBTQ+ consumers would flock to video games as a way of enjoying life and creative storytelling. All the better to experience it with friends. Action Step:
    • Emphasize the social dynamic of video games and celebrate the expressive possibility of joining others in playing your favorite game.

Key Finding #4: LGBTQ+ People Are Social Sports Fans

LGBTQ+ Americans may be less interested in following sports, in general, but they are more likely than others to host sports-viewing parties and go to sports bars to watch games with other people.

Context:

As a segment, LGBTQ+ Americans value being hospitable and congenial higher than other Americans. They also are more likely to say they consider someone “family” if they’re close, but not actually related.

Connecting with others is a deep priority for this segment and sports and fitness is a key way many LGBTQ+ Americans choose to build relationships with others.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize the social aspects of fandom when engaging LGBTQ+ Americans. It’s not so much about the teams or the players, it’s about the fans.

Key Finding #5: LGBTQ+ Americans Use Style to Uniquely Express Themselves

Fashion is a stand-out Passion Point for LGBTQ+ Americans. They see themselves as fashionable and enjoy self-expression and bold choices in their style.

Context:

For many LGBTQ+ Americans, celebrating their uniqueness is not only fun, but also an essential element of discovering themselves. Fashion provides a creative, expressive, and individual outlet for celebrating their own identities externally.

And given how challenging it can be to come out when society isn’t always welcoming, the desire to embrace style and fashion towards self-identity cuts across age and generation.

Action Step:

    • Lean into fashion with LGBTQ+ consumers and don’t be afraid to push some boundaries and innovate. Remember: Style is a tool of self-expression, so use it as a communication tool to this fashion-forward segment.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Analyst

Jill is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2018 graduate from the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Guard Against Recession with Cultural Insights

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Guard Against Recession with Cultural Insights

Collage Group recently launched an urgent initiative into consumer attitudes and behaviors related to current events and the present economic situation. Read on for the main insights you need to know.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Senior Analyst

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With inflation at a 40-year high, job growth increasing the likelihood of interest rate increases, and predictions of recession rampant in the media, Collage Group recently launched an urgent initiative into consumer attitudes and behaviors related to current events and the present economic situation. Our primary objective was to identify how people are currently responding, how they’re likely to react if things get worse, and where and why they’re making tradeoffs.

Fill out the form below to watch the replay and download the presentation for key insights.

Overall, we found that economic concern does differ among the segments. Hispanic and White Americans are the most likely to be very worried about what their personal finances will look like in the near future. These segments also express the greatest concern about the current and future United States economy. On the other hand, Black and Asian Americans are the least likely to say they are very worried about their financial situations six months from now, instead saying they are a little worried, or even not worried at all.

Read on for a few key insights on how different consumer segments are reacting to the current economic landscape, and then download the attached presentation and watch the video to view the full presentation.

Insight #1: Avoid Political Anxieties by Focusing on Consumers’ Practical Problems

Political affiliation was one of the strongest indicators of how survey respondents answered questions about the current United States Economy. Because of today’s highly politicized media landscape, consumers tend to frame messaging about “the economy,” “recession,” and “inflation” in political terms that you as a brand want to avoid.

Don’t play to political anxiety. Instead, focus on solving consumers’ practical problems – like paying their bills, paying down debts, and providing for their families. These concerns are universal and relevant regardless of political party or economic situation.

Insight #2: Consumers’ Economic Concerns Drive Their Everyday Purchasing Behaviors

The path people take on their way to making a purchase necessarily includes concerns about their finances. Current concerns lead to current purchasing choices about what to buy or not buy, and concern for the future drives planning for future spending. This tends to be more directed to bigger purchases that need to be planned and prepared for. Different levels of concern about finances now and in the future lead to different purchasing decisions, which we see playing out today among the different racial and ethnic segments.

Insight #3: Hispanic Consumers Are Most Concerned and Likely to Be Shifting Their Purchasing Now

Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be making more changes to their purchasing. This behavior comes in part from the reality that Hispanic Americans’ average household incomes skew below the total population and allow for less of a financial cushion in hard times. As we’ve seen in our Hispanic Cultural Traits research, Hispanic Americans are also uniquely resilient, and they understand that shifting their purchasing behaviors is a way to adapt to the changing economic landscape.

This segment is more likely than others to be buying both fewer and cheaper items in nearly all categories, showing their willingness to both cut back and buy cheaper substitutes to make ends meet.

Insight #4: Black Americans’ Optimism Is Keeping Their Purchasing Steady

Despite having lower household incomes than other Americans, Black Americans report less worry about their finances than others, both now and in the future. This optimism is innate to the Black American segment across all areas of their lives. Here, it surfaces in the segment’s financial outlook and subsequent purchasing behaviors.

Black Americans are less likely than others to be buying fewer items across all categories, and these differences are statistically significant for apparel, skincare, and beauty / makeup. The segment is also less likely to be switching to cheaper substitutes than others, especially for groceries and home care products.

Insight #5: Asian Americans Aren’t Worried Yet, But Are Beginning to Plan for the Future

And finally, Asian Americans’ have a more nuanced approach to the current economy. They aren’t as worried as Hispanic Americans or as optimistic as Black Americans. The segment’s higher average income level leads to a feeling of security for now, but they are still preparing in case things get worse in the future. That means that they are keeping buying habits largely the same at the moment but are considering delaying major purchases in the future.

More than half of Asian Americans say they will likely delay a big-ticket purchase if their finances worsen in the next six months. This consumer segment is also significantly more likely than others to plan to find an additional job, delay home purchase or renovation, and reconsider retirement and retirement savings if their economic situation gets worse soon.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Analyst

Jill is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2018 graduate from the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Gen Z Passion Points

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Gen Z Passion Points

What matters most to Gen Z consumers? Collage Group’s latest Generational Passion Points study includes key insights into Gen Z consumers to enhance brand engagement and activation.

August 8, 2022
Natalie Griffith – Director, Product & Content

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life of deep interest to consumers. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. And, they are concrete expressions of culture.

Fill out the form to download the attached presentation for key insights and applications.

Collage Group’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 different Passion Points we know are most important to American consumers. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to engage and win diverse consumer segments.

To get you started with our Passion Points research, read on for sample topline findings on Gen Z consumers, as compared to other generational segments.​​

Travel

The majority of Gen Z is already saying they have a strong urge to travel the world–they are close behind Millennials in this passion. And this sense of urgency is consistent across Gen Z cohorts. With the wealth of travel content online, they have had a greater exposure to all the world has to offer at such a young age than any generation before them. And with all that content, they have a had a lifetime to develop FOMO, or fear or missing out, on seeing the world, and travel influencers sure make it look exciting.

Overwhelmingly, 55% of Gen Z agrees they would rather travel internationally. Younger Gen Z, ages 13 to 17, is even more so interested in traveling abroad. This is a great contrast compared to older generations, as it speaks to this generation’s greater ingroup diversity and their acceptance of and interest in experiencing other cultures.

Gen Z is strongly driven by a desire for adventure. When forced to choose, they would rather be doing exciting things than relaxing on vacation. Younger Gen Z comes out on top with 67% preferring excitement. Fun is the priority, a common theme for this generation.

Cooking & Dining Out

Brands must be careful not to overestimate Gen Z’s identification with being a “foodie,” meaning someone who takes enjoyment in meals and trying new foods. While Millennials are known for this, Gen Z is not quite there. The younger group tends to be less adventurous, as it’s important to remember that they are mostly still living at home with their parents, and likely have lacked the freedom to go out and expand their palate. Older Gen Z consumers, however, are now young adults and are more likely to try new foods.

About half of Gen Z and Millennials like to source their recipes from food influencers or chefs. Our data shows that 49% of gen Z saying they follow food influencers, chefs, and other people to learn new recipes. Often what these viral recipes have in common is that they put an unexpected twist on known ingredients, and that they’re easy and accessible.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Gen Z Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Natalie Griffith
Director, Product & Content

Natalie has over 10 years of experience in consumer insights and brand strategy, including 3+ years as lead researcher in Gartner Iconoculture’s Gen Z practice. Natalie has managed research projects across industries, including extensive work in financial services, media, technology, and food and beverage. Natalie holds a B.S. in Psychology from Tulane University.

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Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

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Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

Collage Group joins The Quirk’s Event for a Conversation About Understanding & Engaging Multicultural America Now.

June 29, 2022
David Wellisch – CEO and Co-Founder

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It’s no secret that over the past two years, multicultural consumers have changed how they evaluate and view brands.

But, do brands truly know how multicultural American consumers’—responsible for more than 100 percent of total population growth—have changed since the unprecedented social, economic and public health upheavals since 2020? Or how to effectively engage them through advertising?

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from the presentation and read on for further insights.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now presentation.

To answer this question and more, I was joined by my colleagues David Evans, Collage Group Chief Insights Officer, and Jack Mackinnon, Director of Product & Content, to present at the Quirk’s Event in New York City: a valuable collection of sessions and networking opportunities with leaders in the marketing research and insights field.

In the first part of our session, which included highlights from our “America Now” study, Jack Mackinnon unveiled key changes in Asian, Black and Hispanic consumers’ attitudes and priorities since 2020. Attendees learned what these changes in perspectives mean for their brands, such as how to support the changing landscape of diverse American consumers.

One key takeaway from America Now: when brands that act on social movements, they are more likely to connect with multicultural consumers. However, brands also must accurately portray diverse stories and communities while ensuring that they are being authentic themselves.

Currently, many multicultural Americans are not satisfied with how they are being portrayed by brands. Which means there is an important opportunity for brands to explore how they are portraying multicultural consumers and ensure those representations are authentic. Consumers want brands to portray race and ethnicity accurately, but also want them to include the unique stories that are often not portrayed in advertising. This requires brands dig deeper into multicultural Americans and their stories and develop the diverse advertising campaigns more likely to connect across multicultural consumer groups.

Furthermore, shying away from action on social movements can be harmful for brands, specifically among younger consumer groups, and requires much more than running diverse ad campaigns. In fact, 25% of Black consumers and 21% of Hispanic consumers say they will stop buying from brands that do not take a stance on a social or political issues that are important to them. And for all multicultural consumers, they want to see diversity woven throughout the organization, including internal diversity vs. simply limiting support for a cause to an advertising campaign.

So then how do brands ensure they are connecting with multicultural Americans authentically? The answer is in embedding Cultural Fluency throughout the organization–to engage efficiently and effectively across consumer segments.

In his presentation explaining the “halo effect” of diverse advertising, David Evans explained that Cultural Fluency is an emerging marketing mandate that can no longer be understood as a sideshow to the main act of “mainstream marketing.” It’s a necessary component for connection and growth among multicultural American consumers.

David explained that Culturally Fluent ads that aim to connect with a single story or community can have a halo effect across other consumer segments. For example, many Black and Hispanic centered segmented campaigns halo across other segments, allowing brands to reach even more consumers authentically, especially if the focus is on the “story”. Further White consumers are also responding well to multicultural ads.

We know this because help brands succeed with Cultural Fluent advertising, Collage Group created CultureRate, which leverages 10+ years of research and expertise in the survey design methods needed to understand diverse America. CultureRate is generating 30+ million datapoints annually, with nearly one million consumer responses collected since 2018. It allows our research team–and member brands–to reference the largest database of culturally focused consumer response to ads and brands growing at an annual rate of 100-120 ads, 50,000 of responses or 9 million datapoints.

From an deep analysis of this database, David and his team have unveiled 4 key areas for advertisers to take action on to increase their ROI from the halo effects. Download the excerpt above from the presentation to learn more.

Thank you again to our peers and partners at Quirk’s Media for the opportunity to share this important research. Contact us below to learn how membership to our cultural intelligence platform will help your brand harness cultural insights for growth.

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David Wellisch

David Wellisch
CEO and Co-Founder

David Wellisch is CEO & Co-Founder of Collage Group, a consumer insights and intelligence company with a focus on research exploring race/ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender. Since the inception of Collage Group in 2009, David has led the company through growth, now serving more than 200 brands in across 15 industries. David is passionate about entrepreneurship and company building, and often works directly with members to help guide the integration of multicultural consumer insights and marketing strategies.

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Collage Group Raises $25 Million in Growth Capital to Continue to Fuel Member Engagement with Diverse Consumers

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Collage Group Raises $25 Million in Growth Capital to Continue to Fuel Member Engagement with Diverse Consumers

June 29, 2022
David Wellisch – CEO and Co-Founder

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With deep humility, pride, and excitement, I would like to take this opportunity to announce that Collage Group has raised $25 million in growth capital led by Boston-based growth equity firm Wavecrest Growth Partners, with participation from Dennis Ainge, an industry veteran and investor.  This new funding will be used to continue to accelerate our robust growth and further invest in our technology infrastructure and product innovation, thus continuing to support America’s iconic consumer brands in their journey toward Cultural Fluency.

I could not be more grateful for the honor and opportunity that our brand partners have provided our team, allowing us to serve as their cultural partner. I am truly inspired by the current moment and feel responsible to continue to innovate given today’s complex climate in America. Such forward-looking development will help brands to continue to super serve Diverse America, and, in doing so, amplify the voices of under-represented consumers. I would also like to take this occasion to thank our talented team at Collage Group, who are mission driven, committed to the cause, and at the ready to do what it takes to serve our member brands.

As America’s demographic landscape continues to shift through the accelerated growth of diverse consumers, it is imperative for brands to deeply understand this cultural transformation across race, ethnicity, generation, sexuality, and family relationships. Collage Group was founded on this mission­–to help corporations unleash the power of culture to drive brand growth.

Since 2009, we’ve grown our first mover Cultural Intelligence Platform to be the leading SaaS platform in the space, which now includes four unique data and insights offerings–Multicultural, Generations, LGBTQ+ & Gender and Parents & Kids. The insights and best practices available in the Platform, as well as our custom research and advisory solutions, offer more than 250 of America’s iconic brands continued support. Effectively engaging and resonating with today’s American consumer is a challenging mandate. Our insights, data, and tools have become an important enabler to effectively engage and connect with diverse America, while at the same time generate incremental ROI.

Our investors echo our excitement:

“The spending power of diverse consumers represents most of the potential growth opportunity for America’s leading B2C brands. Furthermore, the current U.S. social environment necessitates a greater understanding of the wants and needs of these consumers. We believe Collage Group provides an essential data and service offering to empower and enable revenue growth, and its traction with over 250 top brands speaks for itself. We’re very excited to be partnering with David and his team to help them capitalize on the market opportunity. Our investment will continue to fuel the company’s growth by expanding the depth of their team, their technological infrastructure and product innovation, and their sales and marketing efforts.”

- Deepak Sindwani, Managing Partner at Wavecrest

“During the past seven years, I’ve watched David assemble an incredible team of professionals who have a passion for evangelizing the benefits of Collage Group’s unique solutions for America’s top brands. The strength of this team, Collage Group’s existing and planned solutions, and the combined value-add of the Wavecrest team guarantees a very bright future for Collage Group and the more than 250 brands they support.”

- Dennis Ainge, founding executive of TARGUSinfo and former Neustar executive

Contact us at the form below if you would like to learn more about our offerings and the many ways that we can help you and/or other teams at your company in your journey to Cultural Fluency.

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Wellisch

David Wellisch
CEO and Co-Founder

David Wellisch is CEO & Co-Founder of Collage Group, a consumer insights and intelligence company with a focus on research exploring race/ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender. Since the inception of Collage Group in 2009, David has led the company through growth, now serving more than 200 brands in across 15 industries. David is passionate about entrepreneurship and company building, and often works directly with members to help guide the integration of multicultural consumer insights and marketing strategies.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

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Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Small businesses drive the American economy, and the number of women-owned small businesses is growing. Read on for more information about how to connect with women small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

June 16, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 1.2 million of those companies are women-owned. The number of women-owned small businesses is growing, and women small business owners are highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions about their business. As a result, women small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owner’s identity, future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study related to women small business owners and contact us to receive insights for the full picture.

Key Insight #1

Women small business owners self-identify as purposeful individuals who think about their impact on the world and value community involvement. They possess a strong desire to have their business connect to other women in their community.

Women small business owners are determined to make a difference in their communities

Implication:

Women small business owners see themselves as perseverant, conscientious, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2

Women small business owners are feeling less confident than men small business owners about the current health of their business. As a result of a more tepid business outlook, they are less likely to aim for expansion.

Women small business owners are less likely to report improvements in their business

Implication:

Recognize that women small business owners haven’t had the easiest year and focus communications on how your company may be able to lend a hand.

Key Insight #3

Women small business owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to women small business owners. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4

Women small business owners are looking for product innovation partnerships with large companies.

Implication:

Provide women small business owners with the tools and knowledge they need to innovate.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
Analyst

Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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How Great Brands are Supporting the LGBTQ+ Community

How Great Brands are Supporting the LGBTQ+ Community

Collage Group was delighted to have hosted more than 100 consumer insights professionals for a conversation with diversity, marketing and research leaders from the American Cancer Society, Paramount Global, UnitedHealth Group / Optum and Pernod Ricard USA.

June 7, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Senior Analyst

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During this presentation, brand leaders shared real-world examples of how they are using diverse consumer insights to support the rights of and improving the lives of LGBTQ+ Americans.
    • Alexander Cammy, Manager, Insights & Cultural Intelligence, Paramount Global.
    • Gina Debogovich, Senior Director, Marketing, UnitedHealth Group / Optum.
    • Tawana Thomas-Johnson, Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, The American Cancer Society.
    • Katherine Chen, Manager, Multicultural & Inclusive Marketing, Pernod Ricard USA.

Read on and fill out the form for the replay and excerpt from our
Pride Month presentation.

The LGBTQ+ segment is a complex, multifaceted group that’s often ignored or misrepresented in advertising. In fact, more than six in ten LGBTQ+ consumers are not satisfied with how people of their sexuality are portrayed in advertising. But representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about the LGBTQ+ community.

Brands today must understand LGBTQ+ people on a multitude of levels—from their demographics to how they identify and even what they value—to effectively understand and engage them.

The Collage Group insights, presented by Senior Research Analyst Jill Rosenfeld, include results from a survey on the LGBTQ+ community’s lived experiences, demographic profile, and attitudes and behaviors specific to Pride Month.

The insights presented were created as part of our member research program, LGBTQ+ & Gender, launched in January 2021. As the leading source of consumer insights about diverse America, we are thrilled to share these insights into sexuality and gender identity with you.

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Other Recent LGBTQ+ Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Analyst

Jill is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2018 graduate from the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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