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In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

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In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

As prices for everyday items continue to soar, a number of Americans find themselves priced out of buying certain products, and others are able to afford but refuse to pay the steeper costs.

August 1, 2022
Quintin Simmons – Public Relations & Communications Manager

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When it comes to grocery shopping the choice to not buy isn’t a realistic option. Inflation has taken a noticeable toll on the cost of goods of all kinds, from home purchases to vehicle buys. The grocery store is no exception.

Fill out the form for more details in an excerpt of our Category Essential on Food.

To contend with higher grocery bills, a segment of shoppers have changed their shopping habits. Overall, most shoppers reported that they have decided to select cheaper brands, or they have opted to purchase fewer items.

Across racial and ethnicity lines, the reaction to grocery price hikes has been largely similar. Hispanic, Black, and Asian American consumers were more likely to report changing where they shop. These three groups also said they have stopped or have reduced making bulk food purchases.

All three segments – plus White American shoppers – said that affordability is indeed a factor when they decide which foods to buy. Of the White Americans polled, 78% answered that they often or always make a special effort to buy foods that are affordable. Black shoppers also see affordability as an important factor, as 73% responded in kind. Close behind them were Asians at 72%. 

Americans Food Choices

When asked what matters most when choosing a store for grocery shopping, 57% of all races responded, “low prices.” Moreover, collectively 42% of Hispanic, Black, Asians, and Whites said they recently decided to purchase cheaper items or generic brands due to the higher grocery costs. Some have bought less groceries and a portion have decided to shop for food elsewhere.

As prices and food bills continue to mount, buyers of all backgrounds have taken notice, and many are making adjustments.

Fill out the form below to learn more about how you can access the full report.

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Quintin Simmons

Quintin Simmons
Public Relations & Communications Manager

Quintin Simmons is Public Relations & Communications manager at Collage Group. He has over two decades of journalism and communications experience, having written and edited for a variety of publications, and servicing as media rep for a number of national outlets. Quintin, a communications and media relations expert, is always looking to connect and engage with writers and reporters.

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Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

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Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now

Collage Group joins The Quirk’s Event for a Conversation About Understanding & Engaging Multicultural America Now.

June 29, 2022
David Wellisch – CEO and Co-Founder

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It’s no secret that over the past two years, multicultural consumers have changed how they evaluate and view brands.

But, do brands truly know how multicultural American consumers’—responsible for more than 100 percent of total population growth—have changed since the unprecedented social, economic and public health upheavals since 2020? Or how to effectively engage them through advertising?

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from the presentation and read on for further insights.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Authentically Engage Multicultural America Now presentation.

To answer this question and more, I was joined by my colleagues David Evans, Collage Group Chief Insights Officer, and Jack Mackinnon, Director of Product & Content, to present at the Quirk’s Event in New York City: a valuable collection of sessions and networking opportunities with leaders in the marketing research and insights field.

In the first part of our session, which included highlights from our “America Now” study, Jack Mackinnon unveiled key changes in Asian, Black and Hispanic consumers’ attitudes and priorities since 2020. Attendees learned what these changes in perspectives mean for their brands, such as how to support the changing landscape of diverse American consumers.

One key takeaway from America Now: when brands that act on social movements, they are more likely to connect with multicultural consumers. However, brands also must accurately portray diverse stories and communities while ensuring that they are being authentic themselves.

Currently, many multicultural Americans are not satisfied with how they are being portrayed by brands. Which means there is an important opportunity for brands to explore how they are portraying multicultural consumers and ensure those representations are authentic. Consumers want brands to portray race and ethnicity accurately, but also want them to include the unique stories that are often not portrayed in advertising. This requires brands dig deeper into multicultural Americans and their stories and develop the diverse advertising campaigns more likely to connect across multicultural consumer groups.

Furthermore, shying away from action on social movements can be harmful for brands, specifically among younger consumer groups, and requires much more than running diverse ad campaigns. In fact, 25% of Black consumers and 21% of Hispanic consumers say they will stop buying from brands that do not take a stance on a social or political issues that are important to them. And for all multicultural consumers, they want to see diversity woven throughout the organization, including internal diversity vs. simply limiting support for a cause to an advertising campaign.

So then how do brands ensure they are connecting with multicultural Americans authentically? The answer is in embedding Cultural Fluency throughout the organization–to engage efficiently and effectively across consumer segments.

In his presentation explaining the “halo effect” of diverse advertising, David Evans explained that Cultural Fluency is an emerging marketing mandate that can no longer be understood as a sideshow to the main act of “mainstream marketing.” It’s a necessary component for connection and growth among multicultural American consumers.

David explained that Culturally Fluent ads that aim to connect with a single story or community can have a halo effect across other consumer segments. For example, many Black and Hispanic centered segmented campaigns halo across other segments, allowing brands to reach even more consumers authentically, especially if the focus is on the “story”. Further White consumers are also responding well to multicultural ads.

We know this because help brands succeed with Cultural Fluent advertising, Collage Group created CultureRate, which leverages 10+ years of research and expertise in the survey design methods needed to understand diverse America. CultureRate is generating 30+ million datapoints annually, with nearly one million consumer responses collected since 2018. It allows our research team–and member brands–to reference the largest database of culturally focused consumer response to ads and brands growing at an annual rate of 100-120 ads, 50,000 of responses or 9 million datapoints.

From an deep analysis of this database, David and his team have unveiled 4 key areas for advertisers to take action on to increase their ROI from the halo effects. Download the excerpt above from the presentation to learn more.

Thank you again to our peers and partners at Quirk’s Media for the opportunity to share this important research. Contact us below to learn how membership to our cultural intelligence platform will help your brand harness cultural insights for growth.

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David Wellisch

David Wellisch
CEO and Co-Founder

David Wellisch is CEO & Co-Founder of Collage Group, a consumer insights and intelligence company with a focus on research exploring race/ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender. Since the inception of Collage Group in 2009, David has led the company through growth, now serving more than 200 brands in across 15 industries. David is passionate about entrepreneurship and company building, and often works directly with members to help guide the integration of multicultural consumer insights and marketing strategies.

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Hispanic Americans Leading the Way in Tech Tools and Technology Usage

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Hispanic Americans Are Leading the Way in Tech Tools and Technology Usage

New Collage Group research shows that Hispanic Americans are trendsetters in using technology. As a segment, they are super users of the internet, social media, and tech tools. 

July 26, 2022
David EvansChief Insights Officer

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Hispanic consumers are more likely to post daily on social media and they use a great deal of social media platforms, including TikTok, according to our latest research. Of course, as a whole, Americans are using such instruments to a higher degree compared to previous years. However, Hispanic Americans surpassed all groups’ usage rates.

The findings are a result of our study: “Hispanic Passion Points,” which was recently released to Collage Group member brands. Passion Points are part of our consumer fundamentals research and seek to offer deep insight into the activities and areas of life consumer segments prioritize.

Our intent is to provide insights that go beyond the preconceptions most brands and marketers have about Hispanic and other diverse-led segments. In this case, the insight is that, for Hispanics, tech savviness is interwoven into a great deal of aspects of Hispanic culture and how it’s evolving.

The findings show that it is the Hispanic culture itself that directly leads to this group using tech to such a high degree. Hispanic Americans are very engaged in a wide variety of hobbies and interests where they seek connection and community – activities that can both directly and indirectly include technology.

An example of this is seen in ordinary activities, such as cooking and baking. Cooking and baking are a key Passion Point for Hispanics. As part of the survey, Hispanic Americans said cooking helps them be closer to loved ones and helps build meaningful relationships. According to this segment, presentation is an important aspect of cooking.

This insight is tied to the segment’s prolific tech use as the Passion Points study found that Hispanic Americans are posting pictures on social media about their cooking and dining out experiences. Forty-six percent said they post pictures of the foods they cook and 42% said they share photos of the foods they eat while at restaurants. Both of these figures are significantly higher than the total American population.

Exercise is another Passion Point for Hispanics. Among those polled, 64% of Hispanic Americans said they work out simply because they enjoy it, which is 15% higher than the total population, and highest across all racial / ethnic segments. Additionally, Hispanic Americans use a number of tech tools to aid in their fitness routine. Nearly a third of them use online free workout videos in their efforts to remain or get in shape, and 16% use a workout app.

The act of playing video games is another Passion Point for Hispanic Americas. To the tune of 50%, Hispanic Americans said they like or love playing video games. Moreover, Collage Group research shows that, when viewed by age, it is revealed that younger Hispanics – those between the ages of 18 and 42 – are more likely to prefer video games vs. board games or card games. Almost half – 46% – stated that they play video games in order to play with other people from around the world. Also, similar to the Passion Point about exercise, Hispanic Americans when compared to other groups, show to be more interested than others in using video games as part of their fitness routine.

The “Hispanic Passion Points” study is an update from Collage Group’s annual Passion Points survey last fielded in May 2022. The survey is a nationally representative sample of 4,514 consumers, including 1,300 Hispanic consumers.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology – July 2022 Update

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology – 2022 Update
Understanding and embracing multicultural terminology is a key component of connecting with diverse America. This study reports findings from our July 2022 Multicultural Terminology update. It offers key findings and action steps brands can use to signal empathy, understanding, and respect to multicultural consumers.

July 25, 2022
Bryan Miller – Director, Syndicated and Solutions

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Getting language and labels right is a key component of authentically engaging across America’s diverse consumer segments. Unfortunately, it’s not easy to know which terminology to use given shifting consumer priorities and the challenges this creates for brands.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology presentation.

To help our members navigate these tricky linguistic waters, we fielded a survey to 4,497 respondents between the ages of 18 and 76 in June 2022. The aim of this survey was to understand the racial and ethnic terminology that Hispanic, Black, and Asian Americans prefer so brands can make data-driven decisions when selecting what terms to use. This study reports our findings, focusing on the nuances of segment-specific terms and consumer preferences towards terms like HispanicLatinoLatinaLatinxBlackAfrican AmericanAsian, and Asian American.

Insights and marketing professionals can use these findings to craft outreach and messaging that respects consumer preferences and signals empathy and understanding. Additionally, the double clicks we offer by acculturation level, generation, and country of origin, when relevant, allow brands to better understand and speak to sub-segments that may have diverging preferences. Below are five key findings and action steps to keep in mind as you craft your strategy to achieve greater connection with diverse America.

Five Key Findings and Action Steps

    1. Hispanic Americans are most positive towards Hispanic and Latino/Latina as terms to refer to the segment as a whole. This holds across generation and country of origin. Use either of these terms when you need to refer to Hispanic Americans in general. If your target is Latin Americans living in the US (including those that do not speak Spanish), defer to Latino/Latina.
    2. Latinx continues to be a polarizing term, though younger Hispanics are more likely to feel positive towards it. Use Latinx if you wish to signal support for the efforts the term was introduced to address, but recognize you may fail to connect and even experience backlash as a result.
    3. Black Americans are generally positive towards both Black and African American as general descriptors. Use African-American to signal connection with the history of Black people in America, including past and current struggles for equality and justice. Use Black if you are hoping to signal inclusivity of individuals that are Black but may not connect with the history of Black people in America, such as recent immigrants from Africa or the Caribbean. This term can also signal connection with current struggles for equality and justice.
    4. Asian Americans are most positive towards Asian and Asian American as terms to refer to the segment as a whole. This holds across generation and most countries of origin. Use either of these terms when you need to refer to Asian Americans in general.
    5. Pacific Islanders express more negative sentiment towards all of the general descriptor terms except for People of Color. Consider using Country of Origin or Country of Origin-American if you are specifically referring to Americans of Pacific Island descent to minimize risk of backlash.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Bryan Miller

Bryan Miller
Director, Syndicated and Solutions

As Director of Content, Bryan leads the content team that produces all of Collage Group’s syndicated research and oversees the AdRate and BrandRate ratings products. Bryan holds a Master of Arts from Georgia State University’s Philosophy and Brains & Behavior Program, a Master of Science in Applied Economics from the University of North Dakota, and a Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in the Philosophy of Science, the Philosophy of Psychology and Bioethics. Outside of work, Bryan is a passionate film buff and lover of great food.

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Aligning Multicultural Marketing to the Evolution of the American Consumer

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Aligning Multicultural Marketing to the Evolution of the American Consumer
Collage Group Joins Ad Age for a Conversation About Multicultural Marketing.

May 17, 2022
Zekeera Belton– Vice President of Client Services

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An incredible cultural transformation of the American consumer is now fully underway. Brand after brand sees the massive growth opportunity that 140 million multicultural consumers represent. These consumers–particularly prevalent among younger generations–are fueling more than 100% of U.S. population growth and are remaking the consumer landscape.

Fill out the form below to watch the replay and hear how brand leaders responded.

As the U.S. consumer landscape evolves, there’s a need for brands and agencies to improve their understanding of culture–across race, ethnicity, generation, sexuality, family relationships and more–and, in turn, evolve marketing strategies for authentic engagement. Understanding culture is grounded in the journey to Cultural Fluency, the ability to tap into shared experiences and intersectional expressions to truly activate and engage today’s diverse consumers.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about consumers across culture. Does your brand truly understand America’s diverse consumers? And, are you effective in authentically engaging across consumer segments?

In a recent collaboration with Ad Age, “Ad Age Next: Multicultural Marketing,” Collage Group had the pleasure of joining other leading brands, including Unilever, Twitter, BET Networks and PepsiCo, to dig deeper into multicultural consumer engagement strategies. The conversation of the panel I joined centered on the term “multicultural,” and the state of multicultural marketing–how it is evolving, best practices and lessons learned.

I was pleased to share key insights that brands need to keep top of mind to continue to be relevant and drive growth across diverse segments.

What we’re seeing across segments is that satisfaction levels of portrayals in advertising have dropped. There is a rising increase in importance of race, but also a backlash in inauthentic portrayals in advertising. Clearly, there is more work to do.

Recent Collage Group research shows multicultural Americans are increasingly interested in supporting brands that support them.

Multicultural Americans Are Increasingly Interested in Supporting Brands that Support Them

% of respondents who say they’re more likely to buy from a brand that supports their own race or ethnicity

Hispanic (+8pp)
60%
Black (+13pp)
76%
Asian (+15pp)
58%

However, they are becoming less satisfied with how they’re portrayed.

But Americans Are Becoming Less Satisfied with How They’re Portrayed

I am satisfied with portrayals of my race and ethnicity in advertising

Acculturated Bicultural Unacculturated
47% (-9pp)
51% (-1pp)
61% (+29pp)

With insights like this in mind, Collage Group has developed a range of solutions to help brands succeed. Our shared-cost syndicated research model embedded into our world class Cultural Intelligence Platform, gives brands access to more than 10 years of diverse consumers insights with new reports weekly. Our members also have access to our CultureRate reports that assess the Cultural Fluency of brands and ads–our database is the largest of its kind, growing annually by more than 200,000 responses. And we offer SO much more.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Zekeera Belton

Zekeera Belton
Vice President of Client Services

Zekeera Belton is the Vice President of Client Services at Collage Group. Zekeera’s oversees the team that acts as an extension of member organization by fostering deep relationships and leveraging the full set of Collage capabilities—strategies, insights, analytics, data, peer solutions and commercial collaboration—to plan and craft specific solutions that meet member challenges. Zekeera is a results-driven marketing and communications executive with 20 years of proven performance executing private and public (government) sector B2B, B2C, and G2M campaigns and programs. She has expertise in all aspects of marketing, from strategy to execution with real world know-how of the national, regional, and grassroots strategies needed to reach niche markets, such as multicultural Americans, women, LGBT, and people with disabilities. Prior to joining Collage Group, Zekeera served as a Marketing Director for Penn, Good & Associates, a marketing services consulting firm located in Washington, DC. Zekeera holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, with a double concentration in Finance and Management, from Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, Washington DC.

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Engage Small Business Owners in America

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Engage Small Business Owners in America
Small businesses drive the American economy and their owners reflect the diverse cultures and perspectives of Americans. Read on for more information about how to connect with small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

April 15, 2022
Jack Mackinnon – Director, Product and Content

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Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 6 million of those companies have at least one paid employee. At the helm of all that economic heft is an owner who tends to be highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions of the business. As a result, small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owners’ identity (collective and by sub-segment), future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study and download the deck for the full picture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Engage Small Business Owners in America presentation.

Key Insight #1: Identity

Small business owners, especially Hispanic, Black, and Asian American small business owners, describe themselves as being innovative, driven, and community-oriented. There is also a sense of shared culture among minority small business owners and a strong connection between Black small business owners and the communities where their businesses operate.

Implication:

Small Business Owners see themselves as innovative, driven, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2: Outlook

Small business owners are confident that their business prospects are going to continue to improve over the next year. Hispanic and Black owners are especially optimistic about how their businesses are performing compared to last year and will perform into the next.

Implication:

Harness the positivity! Even though this hasn’t been an easy year, recognize Multicultural Small Business Owners’ positive sentiment and match it in your communications.

Key Insight #3: Operations

Small Business Owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to small business owners, themselves. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4: Support and Partnerships

Small Business Owners, especially multicultural owners, are looking for specific expertise in the areas of marketing, networking, and financing.

Implication:

Provide Small Business Owners assistance in marketing, networking, and finance via digital tools.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Jack McKinnon

Jack Mackinnon
Director, Product and Content

Jack Mackinnon is a new addition to the Collage Group syndicated research team. He brings consumer insight expertise across Multicultural, Generations, and LGBTQ+ segments.

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Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality

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Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality
Young Multicultural Americans are committed to racial equality in the U.S. today and are demanding brands do their part by speaking out and supporting people who look like them. Read on to learn three ways your brand can engage younger Multicultural Americans on this key issue.

Americans’ Awareness about racism and race-relations in the U.S. is at an all-time high. The racial reckoning of 2020, the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes, and the heightened awareness around Hispanic immigration to America has disproportionately affected Multicultural Americans who call the U.S. home.

Fill out the form for more details on the research and read on for key insights and implications:

In our recent America Now study, we looked at the total population and their perceptions around racism and other major issues happening in America today.

Younger Americans (aged 18-40 years old at the end of 2021) tend to be more Multicultural and they embrace diversity in their professional, personal and even consumer lives. Given their distinct profile we wanted to better understand younger Multicultural Americans’ perspectives towards combatting racial injustice. This is an issue brands can take a stand on, and it turns out, that is what Multicultural Americans want.

Our study found that young Multicultural Americans see their race and ethnicity as an increasingly important part of their identity. Many also believe that negative stereotypes exist simply because of what they look like, and that the media often mispresents Americans of their race and ethnicity, which can propagate negative stereotypes.

To address negative stereotypes and misrepresentation in the media, younger Multicultural Americans believe brands need to take bold action. They want them to speak out against racism.

And they want brands to actively support people who match their own race and ethnicity.

Our research shows us there are three key steps brands can take when it comes to engaging the younger Multicultural consumer in the fight for racial equality.

1) Ensure authentic representation

Ensuring authentic representation goes beyond including Multicultural people in ads. Younger Multicultural Americans want authentic portrayals that include what their families and communities are like as well as accurate portrayals of their life values. They also want brands to help break down the negative stereotypes they have experienced too often.

2) Pick a side

Picking a side includes, but is not limited to, making public statements in the fight for racial justice. It means that in addition to statements, brands will act, whether through financial donations or putting pressure on the government to enact local or national change that supports the cause.

3) Lead from within

Lastly, younger Multicultural Americans want brands to lead from within their own organizations by diversifying internally, committing to a more diverse leadership pipeline, and providing better training to address racial bias. Walking the walk means something to these Americans.

So what can you do to help your brand showcase your commitment to racial justice in America?

Some important next steps:

  1. Go beyond one-dimensional representation in your advertising to capture the totality of Multicultural consumers.
  2. Share efforts your brand or company has taken in the fight for racial equality widely with your audience.
  3. Conduct an internal audit to understand the company’s strengths and weaknesses in the areas of diversity and inclusion. Share positive results widely as well as an improvement plan.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity
Collage Group Launches Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program

American consumer attitudes continue to evolve, and to help you keep pace, Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce our new Parents & Kids Program as part of our leading Cultural Intelligence Platform. This new offering, created with input from nearly a dozen Collage members, is designed to cover the insights marketing and consumer insights professionals need to engage and activate parents and kids across race and ethnicity. Based on our scoping, there is no other syndicated resource available that offers full coverage of parents and kids with race and ethnicity overlays.

Fill out the form below for more details on the new program, including reporting breakouts and content.

Why focus on Parents & Kids?

Demographic change amplifies the need to effectively resonate with America’s diverse parents and their children. In fact, the generations most likely to have children are between 5 and 12 percent more racially and ethnically diverse than older generations.

And, multicultural Americans are 10% more likely to have children under 18 living in their households.

Household with Children Under 18 Present Average Household Size
40% Hispanic
3.4 Hispanic
34% Asian
3.0 Asian
27% Black
2.6 Black
23% White
2.4 White

For many brands, the age of kids is also especially important given the development of decision-making processes–our research will dig deeper into this area. From birth to age 3 children are largely dependent on parental decision-making. As children age, they develop more capacity to make their own decisions.

What’s included in the Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program?

Starting this spring, our new Parents & Kids Program will unveil how culture impacts the roles that moms and dads play in their children’s lives, with insights including:

    • the parenting style(s) they embrace
    • the values they prioritize instilling in their kids
    • how they navigate the impact of the changing media landscape and shifting social norms on their children

The Program also provides insight into how the culture, age and gender of the child impacts parental attitudes and behaviors, including:

    • how they respond to their children’s preferences and desires
    • how they select products and services for their kids across category
    • when and how they “hand-off” decision-making to their kids across category

Collage Group is committed to conducting specific research on both parents and kids to provide unparalleled insights, as many brands have a significant gap in their understanding of the way culture impacts parenting and the parent-child decision-making process. We hope you’ll find value in this new research.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Hispanic Passion Points

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Hispanic Passion Points
What matters most to Hispanic consumers? Collage Group’s latest Multicultural Passion Points study includes key insights into Hispanic consumers to enhance brand engagement and activation.

View our webinar replay and download the attached presentation for key insights and implications:

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life of deep interest to consumers. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. And, they are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into the 8 Passion Points we know are most important to American consumers. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to engage and win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started with our Passion Points research, read on for topline findings on Hispanic consumers, as compared to other racial and ethnic segments.​​

1.) Food

When we asked respondents to rate their interest in cooking and baking, we found that 67% like or love cooking, and 63% like or love baking. Hispanic Americans have an even higher interest in cooking and baking, with 71% saying they like or love cooking and 69% saying they like or love baking. So, why is that the case?

One reason is: Hispanic Americans cook or bake to help them connect with their family’s culture. 35% of Hispanic Americans cook to connect with their culture, compared to just 27% of the total population. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanics particularly enjoy cooking for this reason. But the love of cooking isn’t just about family culture…

Hispanic Americans are also more likely to enjoy cooking for the broader social connections it allows. In our research, we found that 60% of Hispanic Americans say they enjoy cooking and baking with others, and 73% say they like discussing recipes with others. This desire for connection speaks to Hispanic Americans’ group trait of warmth, which is characterized by a drive to build meaningful relationships and an openness towards others.

Hispanic Americans Love to Both Cook and Bake

% of each segment that likes or loves cooking

% of each segment that likes or loves baking

2.) Travel

When we asked respondents how they feel about traveling, most (72%) said they like or love it. Hispanic Americans are particularly fond of traveling, with 78% saying they like or love it. Unacculturated Hispanics especially enjoy traveling. Data from 2021’s Passion Point research suggests that the greater desire to travel is likely tied to having family and friends that live outside of the United States.

When forced to choose whether vacation is about relaxing or doing exciting things, most Hispanic Americans (57%) said relaxing. However, when we look by New Wave (individuals aged 18-42) and Old Guard (individuals age 43-76), we see that younger Hispanics seek out travel that is “exciting.”

Younger Americans Uniquely Seek Out Adventurous Travel

Which of the following statements do you agree with most, even if neither is entirely correct?

Total Population Total Hispanic New Wave Hispanic (18-42) Old Guard Hispanic (43-76)

For me, going on vacation is about relaxing

59%
57%
51%
63%

For me, going on vacation is about doing exciting things

41%
43%
49%
37%

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our cultural intelligence platform.

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

CHALLENGE

The Diverse Segments team of a major Financial Services & Banking brand has a dedicated focus on understanding the specific needs and preferences of consumers to help inform culturally relevant and authentic in-market executions. While the team partners with many market research vendors, they came to Collage Group to add depth to their insights across multicultural and generational consumers in the U.S.  

While the team had developed many successful dedicated advertising executions across the years that speak to cultural nuances, the Financial Services & Banking brand approached Collage Group with a new challenge. They wanted to prove that cultural insights can be applied to create campaigns that widely resonate across the total market, as well. 

SOLUTION

Collage Group has supported many brands in this effort with more than 10 years of quantifiable data evaluating more than 300 brands and ads. The data overwhelmingly shows that culturally resonate advertising featuring a specific segment can and will resonate across broader audiences if done in an authentic, relatable way. This is counter to the thinking that brands face a “trade-off” when deciding between a culturally nuanced dedicated ad aimed at a specific consumer segment and a more generic total market execution.

 

Collage Group partnered with the Financial Services & Banking brand to recommend a solution that would apply the CultureRate:Brand and Ad evaluation methodology in depth across its brand and ads. The result aimed to illuminate that it is possible to break the “genpop vs. targeted” trade-off specifically among the financial sector, helping the Financial Services & Banking brand escape the trap of being generic or forgettable. Further, the solution included key takeaways for the brand to understand where and how they rank among their competitors, and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments.

CultureRate:Ad Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Ad, the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads were put to the test as part of a suite of rigorous methodologies that helped brands navigate the rapidly shifting consumer landscape. The ads were evaluated on two metrics: the Ad Cultural Fluency Quotient (A- CFQ) and Backlash, both of which are supported with an exhaustive range of diagnostic metrics.
    • A-CFQ is Collage Group’s proprietary KPI that uses four factors to optimally predict high brand favorability and purchase intent.
    • Backlash metrics take conventional brand favorability a step further by quantifying the degree to which an ad can “flip” perception from positive to negative or vice versa.
Combining A-CFQ and Backlash metrics for target segments revealed the dynamics that made for the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads successful, or unsuccessful, as compared to their competitors.

CultureRate:Brand Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Brand, the brand was evaluated on the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ), which measures how well brands are resonating with consumers. It assessed the Financial Services & Banking brand along six key cultural dimensions: brand fit, relevance, memories, values, trust and advocacy. The B-CFQ Threshold then helped illuminate for the Financial Services & Banking brand whether their B-CFQ score was high enough to lead to increased brand favorability and purchase intent.

RESULTS

As a result of the CultureRate:Ad and Brand evaluations, Collage Group provided key insight into how the the Financial Services & Banking company’s brand and ads are performing across each diverse consumer segment – Hispanic, Black, Asian and NH-White consumers – as well as by Hispanic Acculturation level.

 

The findings – which evaluated the Financial Services & Banking company vs. its financial service competitors – showed, that while it may be harder for those in the financial space to develop cultural connections with consumers overall, there are still clear winners that have broken through to resonate with multiple segments simultaneously.

 

Evaluating how the Financial Services & Banking brand performed within each consumer segment, as well as in direct relation to their key competitors, enabled the Financial Services & Banking brand to understand their competitive positioning and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments. This work was then shared across the Diverse Segments team to illuminate, and take action on, where the brand was winning and identify opportunities for growth.

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