Day of the Dead: A Time for Tradition

Day of the Dead: A Time for Tradition
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Take a deep dive into how consumers perceive Day of the Dead. This excerpt from Collage Group’s comprehensive Holidays and Occasions research reveals important insights into consumer perceptions of this predominantly Mexican holiday.

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Understanding America’s Cultural Transformation

Wednesday, October 9th | 2:00 PM

Day of the Dead is an important Mexican holiday that often gets tacked on to Halloween advertisements. We heard from many brands that they do not completely understand this holiday or their right-to-play in the space. Our latest research on holidays and occasions helps elucidate how Day of the Dead differs from Halloween, how consumers celebrate it, and solid brand activations around the holiday. Download a sample of the research:

1. Hispanics who celebrate Day of the Dead perceive it as more traditional and religious than Halloween. Do not conflate Day of the Dead with Halloween. Day of the Dead activations should incorporate traditional and religious elements such as creating altars and visiting graves.

2. Day of the Dead is a predominantly Mexican holiday, and the way consumers celebrate varies by acculturation level. Utilize social media for low-cost, targeted activations that highlight acculturation-specific nuances in Day of the Dead celebrations.

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population

Four Things You Need to Know About the U.S. Hispanic Population
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It’s 2019. At this point, no one should be surprised to learn that Hispanic consumers are a must-have for brands that want to maintain and grow market share. Even though the writing’s been on the wall for years, many brands are still struggling to connect with this segment in an authentic and natural manner. A first step to making this sort of connection is to understand who Hispanics are and what they value. Hover over the tiles below to reveal our insights.

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Driving Growth in a Diverse America: Food & Beverage

Wednesday, September 25th | 2:00 PM

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1.

Age

1.

In addition to being large, the Hispanic segment is also remarkably young, with a median age of 29 compared to 40 for the non-Hispanic population. Hispanic prominence in the U.S. will increase as this young segment ages and their education level and median income continue to rise.

3.

Heritage

3.

Although Hispanics firmly believe in keeping and cultivating their cultural heritage, they have had to adapt culturally as immigrants and minorities. As a result, duality is their reality—they navigate the different cultural worlds they inhabit in a way that is easy and authentic. This ability allows the segment to serve as integrators and amplifiers of culture.

2.

Language

2.

The Spanish language will be an important feature of the U.S. consumer landscape for the foreseeable future. After all, 72% of Hispanics speak Spanish at home, and 85% of Hispanic parents speak Spanish to their children.

4.

Family

4.

Hispanics place an emphasis on family as a source of one’s identity and protection against the hardships of life. They are loyal to family and support each other financially and morally. Family relations are grounded in respect and interdependence.

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Beyond the OTT Revolution: How Gen Z & Millennial Viewers are Reshaping Entertainment Media

Beyond the OTT Revolution: How Gen Z & Millennial Viewers are Reshaping Entertainment Media
Connor Wahrman
Connor Wahrman

Connor is an Senior Analyst on the Product & Content team, conducting statistical and machine learning analysis of Collage's survey data. Before joining Collage, Connor received an M.A. in Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences from Columbia University.

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September 25th, 2019

2:00 PM

As the marketplace for online shows and movies gets more and more crowded, reaching young viewers increasingly feels like swimming upstream. These are the insights you need to maximize the share of Gen Z & Millennial eyeballs on your content, platforms, or advertisements.

TODAY’S young consumers and households have high expectations for their show and movie providers. And it’s not because they’re entitled or picky – they’ve just happened to grow up in an extraordinary period of innovation, both in terms of how people access media and the diversity of high-quality content available.

From 1990 to 2010, when Gen Z viewers were just children, the world saw a revolution in entertainment media technology. Digital streaming to personal devices displaced the cable box for many households, and these kids were free to watch whatever they wanted, wherever they wanted. This unprecedented access to content continues to influence their consumer attitudes and behaviors today.

And direct-to-consumer media content allowed for the growth of media giants who don’t have to cater to all of America with their prime-time content. Today’s young consumers are floating down an endless stream of great TV tailored to their specific interests. They’ve matured in the age of “peak TV,” and they don’t expect to crest it any time soon.

These trends impact not only media providers, but also the brands who historically have advertised through them. If young viewers expect more control over their higher-quality media content, it stands to reason that they will be more sensitive towards advertising. Advertisers need to adapt to capture and keep viewer attention, both through rethinking product-content integrations and optimizing the advertisement experience.

To help Collage Group members navigate this new media landscape, in July 2019 we conducted a nationally representative survey of 3085 respondents, oversampling Gen Z and Millennial respondents for precision within these segments. With our members’ input, we designed a survey and conjoint analysis testing key hypotheses on how Millennial and Gen Z consumers compare to older generations, and one another, when it comes to shows and movies.

Take a sample of the research.

This Is How Multiculturals Do Breakfast & Brunch

This Is How Multiculturals Approach Breakfast & Brunch
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Need to get your brand to the top of the morning? Read along and download the report to learn more about the nuances of what Hispanic, African American, and Asian consumers eat and drink for the most important meal of the day.

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Essentials of Hispanic Marketing 
September 11th, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM

In The Food and Beverage Revolution, we at Collage learned that convenience and health are the two factors driving breakfast decisions. But we wanted a second helping of insights that could go deeper into what choices multicultural consumers are making with their morning meals, as well as how they’re approaching the increasingly important occasion of brunch. To learn more, we asked a series of questions across two nationally representative samples, each with roughly one thousand respondents and multicultural/youth over-samples. These consumers gave us more than a taste of their breakfast and brunch behaviors.

1. African Americans have the largest gap between the perceived importance of breakfast and its actual consumption

2. Multicultural consumers are most likely to see brunch as an opportunity to “treat themselves”

Can you guess which segments complete each insight? Download a sample of the research to see the answers.

Hispanic, Asian, African American, White consumers eat the widest variety of breakfast foods, weekend or weekday
White, Asian, African American, Hispanic women prefer sweet and cold breakfast foods relative to men, but multicultural women do not