Top Ten Brands on Shared Values for 2020

Read on to find out which brands consumers identify as sharing their values - and the practices they used to get there.

In a time where people are exposed to more advertising and have more options than ever before, it’s critical for brands to create authentic connections to keep consumers coming back. One way to do this is to demonstrate you care about the things your consumers care about. After all, we know that many consumers across racial and ethnic segments will reward brands that share their values and punish those that defy them.

Collage Group’s brand rating tool, BrandRate, provides insight on how well brands are signaling shared values with consumers.

 The tool, which is designed to assess cultural fluency (i.e., number of segments the brand resonates with), measures shared values by asking brand-aware consumers to agree or disagree with the statement “This brand cares about the things that are important to me.” Here we see the top ten brands among more than 400 in our database that consumers aged 18-39 most often identify as sharing their values.

But we know that America is diverse and different segments have different values that line up with different brands.

So we took a deeper look at the data to understand which brands are connecting on shared values across racial and ethnic segments and which are connecting on shared values with specific segments. The top 10 lists for each racial and ethnic group are below.

First thing to note, both Lysol and Clorox rank highly across segments.

In the era of COVID-19, when consumers are placing higher value on cleanliness and staying healthy than ever before, it’s not surprising to see these brands pop. Lysol and Clorox have proven they value cleanliness and health by having select products approved by the EPA to successfully kill the COVID-19 virus. And they’ve continued to show their commitment to health and safety by making generous donations to various organizations (CDC, NEA and the American Red Cross) fighting against COVID-19 and helping to get the country back up and running.

Second thing to consider, outside of a handful of brands appearing across lists, we also see significant variation by segment.

For example, the top 10 list for shared values for the Black segment includes Chick-Fil-A, Nike, and Fenty. Nike’s a no-brainer given their extensive and very public support for racial equality. And Chick-Fil-A’s high ranking is probably tied to its association with Christianity and Christian values—something the highly religious Black segment likely resonates with.

Fenty Beauty, a brand founded by music superstar Rihanna in 2017, is a relative newcomer that’s been able to connect with Black consumers through its commitment to diversity and inclusion. Fenty has gone that extra step and baked these values into the products it sells. For example, it offers 50 shades of foundation, a substantial improvement over many other brands that treat dark skin as a monolith. The brand also features models of varying genders in their advertising. And it donates 100% of proceeds from select products to the Clara Lionel Foundation, which provides extensive support to marginalized communities around the world.

Our findings illustrate that both rising and established brands can successfully communicate to consumers that they share their values. And you can too.

In addition to shared values, our proprietary B-CFQ (Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient) metric also measures Brand Fit, Brand Relevance, Brand Trust, Brand Advocacy, and Brand Memories. Fill out the form below to learn more about our category-specific BrandRate studies and how you can use them to increase your brand’s cultural fluency. 

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