Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media
Learn how Americans across races, ethnicities, and generations engage with emerging technology and media, including the metaverse, AR, VR, emerging social media platforms, and influencers.

November 21, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives, and today’s media landscape is always changing. Technologies like the metaverse, augmented reality, and virtual reality, along with emerging trends in social media like influencer marketing, have the potential to change people’s everyday lives. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand how people feel about these new technologies, their current usage rates, and if they are interested in using them in the future.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 study on emerging media provides insights across races, ethnicities, and generations on Americans’ behaviors around the metaverse, AR, VR, wearable smart devices, and NFTs. It also looks at newer and emerging social media platforms like TikTok and BeReal, and the power of influencer marketing.

Key Findings: The Metaverse

    • Millennials, alongside Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely to have tried the metaverse and to believe it is for people like them.
    • 1 in 2 Americans want to learn more about the metaverse and they want brands to play a role in that education. This desire is particularly strong for Black Americans.
    • Entertainment is the most popular reason Americans are interested in the metaverse today. This is particularly true for Black and Hispanic Americans.

Context:

Millennial and Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic Americans, are keen to try new technologies as soon as they come out. For Millennials, they have grown up in an era of new tech adoption and now have relatively more resources to buy in to the new tech. Multicultural Americans often turn to technology to explore the world and their own culture, as well as the culture of others.

Many Americans expect brands to be more than just the products and services they offer. Black Americans especially want brands to step up on a host of issues. The lack of clarity still surrounding the metaverse makes it an important opportunity for brands to play a guiding role.

Entertainment holds the key to consumers’ current use (video games, digital concerts, experiences, etc.) and future appeal. Since the metaverse is still in an experimental development phase, entertainment is the most compelling reason for consumers to give the tech a try.

 Action Steps:

    • Develop your metaverse marketing strategy with early adopters – Millennial and multicultural consumers- in mind.
    • During this early phase of the metaverse, take steps to educate consumers about this emerging technology. This can include specific information on what is and isn’t considered the metaverse, the promise the technology holds, and what consumers can expect from your brand on the metaverse.
    • When connecting with Americans on the metaverse, prioritize entertainment experiences. Sponsoring a concert or sports game on the metaverse will be a way to tap into the many Americans who want to use the platform for these experiences.

Key Findings: AR, VR, and Wearable Devices

    • Americans are still not using AR or VR technology at high rates, although many are likely using AR without knowing it.
    • Asian and Hispanic Americans are most likely to use wearable devices. Health and fitness is the leading reason to use these devices, particularly for Asian Americans.

Context:

Many Americans may be unaware that they have used AR in their everyday life because they don’t relate the experience they had with the label of AR. As a result, the concept of “augmented reality” doesn’t have as much traction with consumers as the specific uses and platforms do.

Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic and Asian, have a strong passion for fitness. They are more likely to enjoy working out and a wearable device such as an Apple Watch or Fitbit allows them to stay connected to their fitness goals. But, while many Americans use their wearable for fitness, they are also glancing at their wearable throughout the day.

 Action Steps:

    • Don’t get caught up in labeling the technology your brand offers. Many are enjoying the experience they are getting from this technology, even if they don’t use the terminology.
    • Make marketing “glanceable” so that emails and newsfeeds can work in the small screen of the wearable as well.

Key Findings: Social Media and Influencers

    • Short content is the star of social media platforms, and that is especially true for TikTok. Americans lean into short videos whether they are on TikTok for just a few minutes or way longer.
    • While most Americans think that marketing coming directly from brands is more trustworthy than an influencer, they also find influencers and content creators to be trustworthy sources of information.

Context:

TikTok is known for its “snackable” content, and the desire for Americans to see shorter videos aligns with why this platform became so popular to begin with. Shorter content gives viewers control over how much they watch. Even if they end up watching many videos, it still feels more manageable than committing to one, longer piece of content.

Consumers are savvy about influencer marketing, and partnerships with influencers who are transparent and trustworthy will feel more authentic to them. People don’t expect an absence of advertising on social media, but they do prefer it to be clearly identified as such.

 Action Steps:

    • When advertising on TikTok, keep it “snackable” and deliver videos less than one minute in length.
    • When partnering with a content creator on social media, select those that are authentic and trustworthy including offering transparency and honesty in their decisions and potentially going out of their way to combat misinformation.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Multicultural Americans Say the American Dream is Still in Reach

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Multicultural Americans Say the American Dream is Still in Reach

November 10, 2022
Jack Mackinnon – Director, Product and Content

In one of our latest studies – America Now 2022: Harnessing American Identity to Navigate Social Issues – we uncovered multicultural Americans’ deep faith in the “American Dream.” Seventy-eight percent of Black, Asian, and Hispanic consumers say they have either already reached, or believe they can one day obtain the American Dream.

On the other hand, White consumers weren’t as confident, as only 69% of that segment said the Dream is reachable.

Read on and fill out the form for the recording from our America Now presentation.

To fully understand consumers’ conception of the American Dream, we asked Americans how they define it. Most told us the Dream comprises of homeownership, the ability to retire from work, freedom to live how one desires, and family life stability.

Taking that practical definition into account, we found that 25% of Asian consumers and 21% of Hispanics consumers said that they have already achieved the American Dream. Further, an additional 60% of Hispanic Americans, and 59% of Black Americans, said they haven’t reached the Dream yet, but they expect to fulfill the Dream in the future. 

Hispanic Americans and Black Americans exhibit more certainty in terms of their outlooks in comparison to other American segments. This belief carries over to the faith they have in seeking and eventually achieving the American Dream.

As stated, White Americans aren’t in agreement with this line of thinking. Twelve percent said the American Dream was out of reach for them. To that point, White respondents agree with Black Americans; 20% from both segments said the American Dream was never attainable, no matter how hard they worked in favor of one day reaching it.

The results were different, however, when we sought to understand pride in American. Findings showed that overall, Americans are “quite proud of their country.” Seventy-five percent of those surveyed said they are proud to be an American. White Americans were in front of all racial and ethnic demographics in regard to this question with 79% saying they agree with that sentiment. From the perspective of age, Boomers are the proudest, as 88% responded that they are proud of their country.

Sixty-five percent of Americans said they believe the United States is the best country in the world. Again, White Americans led in this category, with 69% sharing this viewpoint. Baby boomers were the generation that led in this group – 82% said the U.S. is the best country.

By contrast, younger generations were far less likely to agree with this sentiment of the U.S. being the best. Only 36% of Gen Z said the U.S. was the best in the world, compared to 68% of Gen Xers and 59% of millennials.

While Gen Z Americans have a completely different perspective of American exceptionalism, this doesn’t mean they don’t appreciate the country. We must be mindful that this generation has had access to greater diversity and a more global perspective from an earlier age than all other older Americans. In turn, they have a unique mindset; they are more likely to look outward.

The America Now study also revealed an intriguing insight about how consumers assess gun violence. Multicultural consumers are the most concerned about such violence, as 80% of Black consumers said gun violence is serious or a very serious problem. Asian consumers agreed to the tune of 77% and Hispanic consumers concurred to the tune of 75%.

Black and Hispanic consumers were also on the same page regarding racism being a high-ranking area of concern, with 77% and 68% respectively, citing it as serious or very serious.

So, while multicultural Americans point to racism as a significant matter, they also say it’s an area where they do want brands to engage. This is especially the sentiment among younger Americans. Sixty-five percent of Gen Zer’s state that racism is a serious issue to them.

Brands should pay close attention to the complex mix of perceptions toward American social and political issues across diverse segments. Focus on insights pertaining to America, as well as the issues Americans care about and where they show concern.

Hispanic, Black, and Gen Z Americans are those most likely to say, ‘we want to see brands engaging in a set of topics we care about,’ such as racism or climate change. Moreover, these demographics are engaged and positive about the American Dream in surprising, if not counter-intuitive ways. It’s important to do the research to understand this phenomenon and how brands can activate successfully in this context.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jack McKinnon

Jack Mackinnon
Director, Product and Content

Jack Mackinnon is a new addition to the Collage Group syndicated research team. He brings consumer insight expertise across Multicultural, Generations, and LGBTQ+ segments.

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know
Learn how American consumers across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and celebrate the winter holiday season.

October 24, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

Holidays and occasions are focal points for many Americans. These events afford people the opportunity to express their cultural traditions and individual preferences through decorations, food and beverage, entertainment, and activities.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Multicultural Holidays & Occasions presentation.

Holidays and occasions are also important for brands and organizations as they present an opportunity to deepen connection with consumer segments. Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Christmas and Kwanzaa are some of the key winter holidays brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention. Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this holiday by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and celebrate these holidays. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

Key Insight #1:

Half of Hispanic Americans celebrate Día de los Muertos, and Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are most comfortable with brands activating on this holiday.

Key Insight #2:

Most Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, and most Multicultural consumers incorporate non-traditional foods into their Thanksgiving celebrations.

Key Insight #3:

 Hispanic and Asian American segments are more likely to say their Christmas celebrations go beyond “typical” American traditions.

Key Insight #4:

Kwanzaa is a popular holiday, celebrated by many Black Americans.

Key Insight #5:

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are popular for Black and Asian Americans as a kick-off to holiday shopping.

What can my brand do to activate on a winter holiday?

    • Focus on authenticity, particularly if you are activating on a holiday that is celebrated by a specific racial or ethnic segment like Dia de los Muertos and Kwanzaa. Depending on your brand, this can include a simple celebratory message on social media pages, helping to educate the broader community about the holiday, or partnering with in-segment content creators to tell their own personal stories related to the holiday.
    • Highlight what is non-traditional about traditional American holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas are celebrated across racial and ethnic segments, but many Multicultural Americans have their own traditions based on their heritage and upbringing. Showing the range of how Americans celebrate will appeal to many Americans, particularly those who are Multicultural, and who have different ways of celebrating.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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The New Marketing Imperative: How Brands Win by Navigating Diverse America’s Evolving Priorities

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The New Marketing Imperative: How Brands Win by Navigating Diverse America’s Evolving Priorities

In 2022, increasing polarization on social issues revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. Further, it has become clear that conventional wisdom is no longer reliable, particularly in regard to where various segments stand on social matters. 

October 3, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Collage Group’s Virtual Annual Member Roundtable is Thursday, Nov. 3 from 1 – 4 p.m. ET

National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.  

To navigate this minefield, it’s necessary to deeply understand where America’s diverse consumers stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. 

CMO Panelists

Francesco Lagutaine
Chief Marketing Officer

Michael Smith
Chief Marketing Officer

Gary Osifchin
Chief Marketing Officer & GM, US Hygiene

Here are some highlights from our agenda. Download the full agenda.

America Now 2022: Harnessing American Identity to Navigate Social Issues

Our Keystone presentation, America Now, will reveal Americans’ stances on major issues including race relations, abortion, climate change, LGBTQ+ rights, and challenges with personal finances and inflation. Throughout this presentation, we will go deeper than ever before, addressing if and how Americans want brands to respond to these social issues. 

The core of our research unveils how diverse consumer segments respond to the central ideas that have driven marketing for decades, such as the belief in the American Dream. In a time of radical cultural transformation, learn how brands can activate diverse segments with these core ideas in flux.

CultureRate Ad and Brand Performance: Engage Diverse Consumers with Lessons in Cultural Fluency

In this section of the Roundtable, you’ll access insights learned from our proprietary CultureRate database as we reveal new learnings into how your brand can differentiate and win across the diverse consumer spectrum.

Whether you are targeting across all consumer segments, working to resonate with multicultural consumers generally, or targeting a specific race or ethnicity, this research covers the bases on what works and why in ads–and provides examples from the brands that are winning in each case.

Our team calls out key lessons from winning brands and ads to guide you as you plan your marketing campaigns post- mid-term elections and into the new year.

CMO Panel: Succeeding Amidst America’s Cultural Divisions

Collage Group members have thought deeply about how to successfully navigate America’s cultural divisions that are likely here to stay. In this panel discussion with Chief Marketing Officers from America’s iconic brands, including M&T Bank, NPR and Reckitt, you’ll hear directly from them about the actions they are undertaking in marketing and insights strategy to successfully navigate the new social landscape.

Don’t miss this chance to learn how to navigate the challenge of connecting with diverse American consumers–across race, ethnicity, generation, sexual identity, and gender. Reserve your spot today!

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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New Diverse Consumer Insights for Q4 2022

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New Diverse Consumer Insights for Q4 2022

More than 250 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you?

September 20, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Here’s an overview of the new reports we’re releasing in Q4 2022 and beyond that you’re missing out on.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these
diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable

In 2022, increasing polarization around social issues has revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. But it has also become clear that the conventional wisdom regarding where various segments stand on social issues is no longer fully accurate. National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.

To navigate this minefield, brands need a clear understanding of where Americans across diverse segments stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. Collage Group’s 2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable, featuring updates to our America Now and CultureRate research, will help brands and organizations navigate the challenge of connecting during this period of uncertainty and confusion. Attendees will walk away with insights and tools to make data-driven decisions that will maximize connection.

Category Essentials

Our category-specific research evaluates consumer attitudes and behaviors across specific consumer goods industries. New proprietary deliverables, which include deeper category insights identified by member request, will be made available for each of our four memberships throughout the fall.

Media Habits & Channels

Learn how to connect with diverse consumers by engaging them through media. This quarter we will explore Americans’ behaviors and attitudes related to various entertainment and social media (visual, social, audio). Our research centers on both traditional media and content, as well as new channel preferences.

CultureRate

Through insights gleaned from our CultureRate database, we will unveil lessons learned from top performers across diverse segments. CultureRate provides a one-stop solution for our members’ mounting need for a comprehensive, ongoing analysis of the cultural fluency of their brands. Cultural fluency is crucial to future growth as American consumers become more responsive to multicultural themes, representation, and stories. In our all-new Q4 research, learn how CultureRate continues to be an asset for companies, many which are leveraging the largest database of its kind available and growing annually by over 200,000 responses or 30 million unique datapoints.

Parents & Kids

Create a lifetime of brand loyalty by tapping into the evolving needs of parents and their children. With rapidly changing demographics, families are becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. Discover how your brand can leverage these insights to better engage parents and kids.

Health & Wellness

Health affects every community in America, and is a key area of interest for consumers, especially as we approach a post-pandemic America. Learn more in this exploration of diverse consumer health and wellness attitudes and behaviors, covering payers, providers, and industry insights.

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Guard Against Recession with Cultural Insights

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Guard Against Recession with Cultural Insights

Collage Group recently launched an urgent initiative into consumer attitudes and behaviors related to current events and the present economic situation. Read on for the main insights you need to know.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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With inflation at a 40-year high, job growth increasing the likelihood of interest rate increases, and predictions of recession rampant in the media, Collage Group recently launched an urgent initiative into consumer attitudes and behaviors related to current events and the present economic situation. Our primary objective was to identify how people are currently responding, how they’re likely to react if things get worse, and where and why they’re making tradeoffs.

Fill out the form below to watch the replay and download the presentation for key insights.

Overall, we found that economic concern does differ among the segments. Hispanic and White Americans are the most likely to be very worried about what their personal finances will look like in the near future. These segments also express the greatest concern about the current and future United States economy. On the other hand, Black and Asian Americans are the least likely to say they are very worried about their financial situations six months from now, instead saying they are a little worried, or even not worried at all.

Read on for a few key insights on how different consumer segments are reacting to the current economic landscape, and then download the attached presentation and watch the video to view the full presentation.

Insight #1: Avoid Political Anxieties by Focusing on Consumers’ Practical Problems

Political affiliation was one of the strongest indicators of how survey respondents answered questions about the current United States Economy. Because of today’s highly politicized media landscape, consumers tend to frame messaging about “the economy,” “recession,” and “inflation” in political terms that you as a brand want to avoid.

Don’t play to political anxiety. Instead, focus on solving consumers’ practical problems – like paying their bills, paying down debts, and providing for their families. These concerns are universal and relevant regardless of political party or economic situation.

Insight #2: Consumers’ Economic Concerns Drive Their Everyday Purchasing Behaviors

The path people take on their way to making a purchase necessarily includes concerns about their finances. Current concerns lead to current purchasing choices about what to buy or not buy, and concern for the future drives planning for future spending. This tends to be more directed to bigger purchases that need to be planned and prepared for. Different levels of concern about finances now and in the future lead to different purchasing decisions, which we see playing out today among the different racial and ethnic segments.

Insight #3: Hispanic Consumers Are Most Concerned and Likely to Be Shifting Their Purchasing Now

Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be making more changes to their purchasing. This behavior comes in part from the reality that Hispanic Americans’ average household incomes skew below the total population and allow for less of a financial cushion in hard times. As we’ve seen in our Hispanic Cultural Traits research, Hispanic Americans are also uniquely resilient, and they understand that shifting their purchasing behaviors is a way to adapt to the changing economic landscape.

This segment is more likely than others to be buying both fewer and cheaper items in nearly all categories, showing their willingness to both cut back and buy cheaper substitutes to make ends meet.

Insight #4: Black Americans’ Optimism Is Keeping Their Purchasing Steady

Despite having lower household incomes than other Americans, Black Americans report less worry about their finances than others, both now and in the future. This optimism is innate to the Black American segment across all areas of their lives. Here, it surfaces in the segment’s financial outlook and subsequent purchasing behaviors.

Black Americans are less likely than others to be buying fewer items across all categories, and these differences are statistically significant for apparel, skincare, and beauty / makeup. The segment is also less likely to be switching to cheaper substitutes than others, especially for groceries and home care products.

Insight #5: Asian Americans Aren’t Worried Yet, But Are Beginning to Plan for the Future

And finally, Asian Americans’ have a more nuanced approach to the current economy. They aren’t as worried as Hispanic Americans or as optimistic as Black Americans. The segment’s higher average income level leads to a feeling of security for now, but they are still preparing in case things get worse in the future. That means that they are keeping buying habits largely the same at the moment but are considering delaying major purchases in the future.

More than half of Asian Americans say they will likely delay a big-ticket purchase if their finances worsen in the next six months. This consumer segment is also significantly more likely than others to plan to find an additional job, delay home purchase or renovation, and reconsider retirement and retirement savings if their economic situation gets worse soon.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group