Travel & Hospitality: Five Key Insights for Engaging Multicultural Consumer Preferences

, , ,
Travel & Hospitality: Five Key Insights for Engaging Multicultural Consumer Preferences

As a second pandemic summer comes to an end, many Americans are planning their holiday travel amidst consistent and lasting changes to their preferences and expectations of the travel and hospitality industries. For marketing and consumer insights professionals in travel and hospitality, understanding these shifts in diverse consumer behavior is vital to improving short- and long-term brand engagement strategies.

Collage Group’s latest Passion Points research unveils how American consumers across racial and ethnic segments engage with travel, and which segments care most deeply about this important aspect of American life. Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. And they are concrete expressions of culture.

Brands apply Passion Points to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Point research provides critical insight for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Download an excerpt of our research for travel-related attitudes and behaviors marketers and insights leaders can use to connect with diverse America. And read below for five key insights for engaging multicultural consumer travel preferences.

Fill out the form to view a sample from our research on consumer attitudes and behaviors around Travel & Hospitality.

Passion Points - Travel

1. Most Americans are Eager to Travel

While many Americans remain concerned about the safety and health of traveling amidst the pandemic, most Americans are eager to travel, with Acculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans leading the pack at 74%.

Most American are Eager to Travel after COVID-19

2. And More than Half of Americans Want to See the World

Despite a preference for traveling domestically, 55% of Americans say they have a strong urge to see the world, with Black and Asian consumers saying they are most interested in traveling abroad.

Many Americans Report a Strong Urge to see the World

3. 1 in 3 Americans Have a Favorite Travel Destination

Many Americans may already know where they want to travel. While one-third of Americans say they have a preferred vacation or travel destination, Black consumers are the least likely – at 23%.

One in three Americans have a favorite travel destination

4. Consumer Preferences for How They Travel Vary Across Race and Ethnicity, and Asian Americans Enjoy Flying the Most

The experience of flying is most enjoyed by Asian Americans (63%), while less than half of Hispanic consumers say they enjoy the experience. However, Hispanic consumers show great variation in their preference for flying across acculturation levels.

Asian Americans most enjoy the experience of flying

5. And a Large Majority of Consumers Enjoy Road Trips

Many Americans may be taking to the roads for holiday travel, as more than 75% say they enjoy road trips. Make sure not to miss the extreme variations across Hispanic acculturation: Unacculturated Hispanics are the least likely to enjoy the road (15%), while acculturated Hispanic consumers prefer this method of travel (78%).

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Multicultural Consumer Media Consumption

Multicultural Consumer Media Consumption

Optimize your brand’s connection with consumers across multicultural segments by understanding where they consume media content, and why they go where they do. Keep reading for key insights on social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming, with downloadable deck and webinar replay.

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

    • Are they following specific topics?
    • Are they following influencers?
    • Are they looking for products to purchase?
    • Are they just killing time?
    • Is it device dependent?
    • Does it depend on the race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender of the characters or hosts?

Collage Group’s 2021 Media Study answers these questions by providing granular insights across multicultural segments. Our research reveals the specific platforms American media users go to, and what they’re using them for. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Fill out the form below to access the Media Consumption in Diverse America ranked as part of our CultureRate research.

Media Consumption in Diverse America

Social Media

Key Insight: Across age cohorts, multicultural segments are more likely to engage in consumer journey behaviors on social media.

Not only are multicultural Americans more likely to use social media in the first place, they’re also more likely to be power-users, engaging with brands and products alongside friends and family. These relative differences are most pronounced for the 41+ Hispanic segment, where they uniquely over-index in finding new products, communicating directly with brands, finding coupons, and participating in competitions on social media.

Video Media

Key Insight: Black and Hispanic Americans are most likely to add subscriptions for specific content

Over half of Hispanic Americans, and about a third of Black and Asian Americans, listen to podcasts or radio shows in a non-English language. And for Hispanic and Asian consumers, the primary resource they use is social media, on platforms like YouTube and Twitch. Hispanic Americans also over-index on AM/FM radio, Spotify, and Pandora for non-English audio content.

Audio Media

Key Insight: For non-English radio shows and podcasts, social media and AM/FM radio are multicultural consumers’ go-to sources. 

Over half of Hispanic Americans, and about a third of Black and Asian Americans, listen to podcasts or radio shows in a non-English language. And for Hispanic and Asian consumers, the primary resource they use is social media, on platforms like YouTube and Twitch. Hispanic Americans also over-index on AM/FM radio, Spotify, and Pandora for non-English audio content.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Fill out the form below to access the Top 20 Brands and Ads ranked as part of our CultureRate research.

How Great Brands Are Engaging and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

, , ,
How Great Brands Are Engaging and Celebrating Hispanic Culture

Collage Group Hosts Univision, Toyota, Publicis Media, Bimbo Bakeries and UnitedHealthcare for Hispanic Heritage Month Discussion & Celebration

From leadership and literature to music and art, Hispanic Americans have made substantial contributions to shaping the rich cultural fabric of the United States. At the launch of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, 2021, Collage Group is honored to have hosted nearly 200 marketing and insights professionals for a special virtual event. We were joined by five brand leaders to share insights and ideas for brands to recognize and celebrate Hispanic culture.

Fill out the form to watch a replay of the presentation and panel discussion, and download an excerpt of the insights:

Collage Group Chief Insights Officer David Evans started off the event with insights on the demographic profile and cultural traits of the Hispanic consumer, as well as insights form our just-released Holidays & Occasions work specific to Hispanic Heritage Month.

David’s presentation was followed by a conversation with Collage Group member panelists moderated by David Wellisch, Collage Group CEO and Co-Founder. Panelists included:

    • • Roberto Ruiz, Univision, EVP of Research, Insights & Analytics
    • • Erika Caldwell, Toyota, Multicultural Brand and Marketing Lead
    • • Arnetta Whiteside, Publicis Media, VP, Research and Knowledge Management, Cultural Quotient
    • • Pepe Gil, Bimbo Bakeries USA, Marketing Director
    • • Anne Gowen, UnitedHealthcare, Senior Director of Marketing, Medicare & Retirement Marketing team

Panelists answered key questions about their challenges and successes in authentically engaging and supporting Hispanic Americans, including:

Q1: The Hispanic community has grown substantially during the past decade and now represents nearly 19% of the U.S. population, or more than 62 million consumers.

    • • For our media and agency panelists: how has this growth impacted the ways in which brands are prioritizing and engaging Hispanic consumers?
    • • And for our brand panelists: how has your brand evolved to effectively engage all Hispanic consumers across language spectrum and country of origin?

Q2: What challenges has your brand faced with engaging this fast-growing, impactful consumer segment, and how have you worked to address them?

    • • For our media and agency panelists: what are the most significant challenges that brands are currently facing in effectively and efficiently engaging the Hispanic consumer?
    • • For our brand panelists: what are the most significant challenges that brands are currently facing in effectively and efficiently engaging the Hispanic consumer?

Q3: What efforts to support the Hispanic community on issues such as jobs, health care, racial and ethnic inequality and immigration have you seen from your company during the past six months?

Q4: What do you think the Hispanic community – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

Q5: Tell us about the efforts you are undertaking to celebrate Hispanic culture during Hispanic Heritage Month?

Fill out the form above to watch the replay and find out how these brand leaders responded.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Without Cultural Fluency, Brands Risk Major Backlash from Ads

, , ,
Without Cultural Fluency, Brands Risk Major Backlash from Ads

Effective ads require cultural fluency, the ability to use culture to efficiently and effectively connect across consumer segments.

The Challenge

Conventional ad testing poses challenges with legacy norms and sample bias and can exacerbate a cultural disconnect between your brand and the consumers you need to engage for growth.

The Opportunity

Built on a framework of a deep understanding of the cultural and emotional influences that inform how consumers from diverse backgrounds process ads, CultureRate:Ad helps you connect across culture.

If done incorrectly, advertising can create Backlash, which we define as flipping perception from positive to negative, creating a substantial decline in Brand Favorability. According to our CultureRate:Ad research, a startling 20-25% of consumers experience a “flip” in perception after watching just one ad. Our measurement of Backlash, combined with other metrics, can reveal characteristics of your ad that could be harmful to your brand.

This is a common challenge by leading brands. Read on for several examples of consumer backlash resulting from ads that missed the cultural mark.

Jeep | Winter 2021

Washington Post
With the attack on the U.S. Capitol only a month prior to the airing of this ad, emotions were high – fear, and anger, and joy – and all still fresh in the public consciousness. Calls by Jeep for unity and “the middle” were panned as “late” and “tone-deaf.”

Featuring Bruce Springsteen, a working-class hero of days gone by, the somber embrace of nostalgia didn’t seem to be an answer to the challenges of “the road ahead.” While it may have been intended as heartfelt, especially coming from the Boss, the dissonance between tone and message seemed to offer more confusion than reconciliation for Americans across all political persuasions. The ad was eventually pulled, following consumer backlash combined with a Springsteen drunk driving scandal.

Twitch | September 2020

esports.com
In its attempt to celebrate the Hispanic community during Hispanic Heritage Month, Twitch was heavily criticized for their campaign launching “stereotypical” emotes and spotlighting primarily English-speaking streamers. The streaming community responded with outrage. Within three hours, Twitch apologized saying they “missed the mark” and removed the emotes from the platform.

Peloton | Fall 2019

New York Times
With an ad widely criticized as “sexist and dystopian,” Peloton effectively tanked their stock by nearly $1.5 billion. The ad features a woman who received an exercise bike from her partner as a Christmas gift. She’s inspired to record a video diary of her new exercise routine, which she says, “changed her.” Critics slammed the ad as “offensive” and “damaging” calling attention to the fact that she was thin at the beginning of the ad, and implying her partner was patronizing for telling her to get fitter and lose weight.

Dolce & Gabbana | Winter 2018

Fast Company
In a failed attempt at a gaffe, a D&G ad featured a confused Asian woman attempting to eat spaghetti with chopsticks. Dressed in a red, European style dress the ad subtly suggested that while the woman embraces European fashion, she’s too stupid to truly understand European culture. Chinese consumers took to social media (Weibo), calling the ad offensive, racist and deliberately misrepresenting their country as a third-world nation.

Pepsi | Spring 2017

New York Times
With borrowed imagery from the Black Lives Matter movement, Pepsi failed in its attempt “to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding”. The ad, featuring Kendall Jenner, shows attractive young people smiling, laughing, dancing, and clapping at a public demonstration. Supported by cheers and applause from the crowd, Jenner, a white woman, gives a grinning police officer a can of Pepsi. Social media erupted with criticism accusing Pepsi of “appropriating imagery to sell its product, while minimizing the danger protesters encounter and the frustration they feel.” Within a day of airing the ad, Pepsi immediately pulled it and offered a public apology.

Answering the Challenge

While connecting across diverse consumer cultures certainly comes with challenges, there is good news. You don’t have to risk spending millions on an ad campaign that generates Backlash and causes harm to your brand, and even your company’s stock price. Collage Group’s CultureRate:Ad offers brands a superior way to assess the cultural fluency and resonance of ads. 

CultureRate:Ad measures ad performance using a proprietary metric, the Ad Cultural Fluency Quotient. With a deep oversample of diverse Americans, brand leaders get rich insight into how consumers process ads across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual orientation, gender, and other factors. Brand leaders use CultureRate:Ad and CultureRate:Brand to build cultural fluency, the capability to drive total market growth from inclusive, diverse-led marketing.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Top CultureRate Scores Reveal Category Insights

, , ,
Top CultureRate Scores Reveal Category Insights

Top CultureRate Ad and Brand scores reveal both top-performers and provide crucial context for category-wide Cultural Fluency.

CultureRate:Ad and Brand measures Cultural Fluency through a key metric we call the Cultural Fluency Quotient (CFQ) score. CFQ scores are designed to specifically to measure cultural resonance across segments for both ads (A-CFQ) and brands (B-CFQ). To do so, we have tested a multitude of components to accurately measure cultural resonance and ensure that a higher CFQ score is an indication of higher purchase intent and brand favorability.

Ultimately, CFQ scores are a crucial way for you to gauge your own brand or ad’s cultural fluency and to take stock of the cultural fluency of your in-category competitors.

In addition to individual CultureRate reports, top CFQ score reports are now available for Collage Group members, and provide industry-specific data. Each report includes overall category CFQ rankings by consumer segment and acculturation, as well as Cultural Reach scores, aka how many segments with whom an ad or brand is resonant. Where robust sample is available, sub-category rankings are also included.

CultureRate:Ad Top Scores

CultureRate:Ad reports measure cultural fluency by gauging consumer sentiment across 4 key component areas: Brand Fit, Personal Relevance, Important Messaging, and Enjoyment. Component scores are weighed and combined to create an Ad Cultural Fluency Quotient (A-CFQ) score. The A-CFQ score gives members crucial insights into their brand’s resonance across multiple consumer segments, as well as where to focus strategies on improvement.

Collage Group assessed the top A-CFQ scores across twelve categories: alcohol, auto, beverage (non-alcoholic), financial services, food, health care, home care, media, personal care, QSR, technology, and travel.

CultureRate:Brand Top Scores

CultureRate:Brand reports measure the cultural fluency of a brand. Our B-CFQ scores gauge consumer sentiment across 6 key component areas: Product Fit, Personal Relevance, Brand Trust, Memories, Advocacy, and Shared Values. The B-CFQ score gives members crucial insights into their brand’s resonance across multiple consumer segments, as well as where to focus strategies on improvement.

Collage Group assessed B-CFQ for brands across fifteen categories: alcohol, apparel, auto, beverage (non-alcoholic), financial services, food, health care, home care, media, personal care, QSR, retail, technology, telecom, and travel.

Variation Across Categories

A review across the rankings also reveals trends across category in both A-CFQ and B-CFQ scores. Some categories like Media tend to have higher top scores while others such as Financial Services tend to possess lower scores. This, in and of itself, is an important insight. Categories with higher CFQ scores have the and advantage of built-in cultural resonance but may succumb to complacency and risk stagnation. Brands in categories with lower average CFQ scores may have to overcome intrinsic gaps in cultural fluency, but have a clear opportunity increase cultural fluency and stand out from competitors. Either way, our insight into Cultural Fluency can help your brand better connect with consumers across segment and produce more powerful ads.

If you would like to receive your own CultureRate:Ad or CultureRate:Brand report and learn more about the cultural fluency of your advertising, please contact us here.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

The 2020 Census: Three Things You Need to Know

, , ,
The 2020 Census: Three Things You Need to Know

The 2020 census data has arrived! And it shows that America is much more racially and ethnically diverse than we thought. Keep reading to learn more about this and other key insights.

Unless you’ve been taking a break from media for the past few days, you’ve probably heard the news: 2020 census data has arrived. And there’s a lot of interesting and potentially confusing information you need to understand. Below are three takeaways we think everyone should know.

1. The 10-year U.S. growth rate is at a 90-year low.

The U.S. population only grew 7.4% between 2010 and 2020. As Bill Frey of the Brookings Institute notes, this is the lowest 10 year growth rate since the 1930s. One component of lower overall growth is a decline in the Hispanic segment’s growth. This dropped to 23% this past decade, down a full 20 percentage points from the 2000-2010 rate of 43%.  The other driver of the decline—a shrinking white population.

2. The Non-Hispanic White population shrunk for the first time since the 10-year census started being conducted in 1790.

The Non-Hispanic White population lost about 5 million people in the 2010s, almost 2.6% of the segment’s 2010 population. This is primarily due to the aging of this population, as well as the increasing number of young Americans now identifying as multiracial. And that brings us to our third takeaway…

3. America is much more racially and ethnically diverse than we thought in 2010.

The big finding supporting this hypothesis is that the multiracial population jumped 276% over the past decade—from 9 million in 2010 to 33.8 million in 2020. Does this mean that there are 25 million more multiracial individuals living in the U.S. in 2020 than there were in 2010? No, and the reason why is that the way the 2020 census asked certain questions allows us to better understand America’s racial and ethnic makeup—both today and retrospectively. For example, the Hispanic/Latino origin question revised the nationalities it listed as example options to both reflect the largest populations in the U.S. and provide better geographic diversity. It also removed the word “origin” from the fourth option’s instructions. These two changes increase the likelihood that people will correctly identify as Hispanic or Latino.

The 2020 Census also made extensive changes to its race question. For instance, example origins were given for the White and Black or African American options, the word “Negro” was removed from the Black or African American option, and the Asian countries of origin were ordered to reflect U.S. population sizes. Finally, the 2020 Census changed its coding practices, allowing researchers to capture more information from individual responses.

The practical upshot here is that we get a better picture of how people self-identify in terms of race and ethnicity. And this is how we have come to understand that America is actually much more diverse than we thought it was 10 years ago. The revised questions most likely account for a significant portion of the changes we see in the 2020 racial and ethnic population counts. Another consequence, though, of the revised questions is that comparisons between 2010 and 2020 race and ethnicity counts are not “one-to-one” and require considerable caveats.

A final point to keep in mind—the 2020 Census only includes a limited number of variables on Americans.

Collage Group primarily utilizes the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) data for its demographic tabulations, as the ACS includes a much larger number of annually-updated variables. The next release of ACS data is slated for December 2021. We’ll be updating our demographic content as soon as this far more detailed data drops.

The 2020 census further clarifies that America is steadily growing towards greater cultural diversity. And this trend presents significant challenges – and opportunities – for brands and companies. Brands that deeply understand multicultural Americans will be well-positioned to connect with consumers across diverse segments. They will become culturally fluent organizations. But brands that fail to invest now in understanding and connecting with multicultural America will find themselves playing an increasingly challenging game of “catch up” and “I’m sorry” as they inevitably hit bumps in the road towards an increasingly multicultural America.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

External Resources for Antiracist Education and Action

External Resources for Antiracist Education and Action
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

To genuinely reflect and connect with multicultural consumers, brands need to lead by example and take meaningful action. It is no longer enough, or even acceptable, to simply communicate support and solidarity with communities of color without following through with concrete action.

But how do you get there?

We at Collage decided to roll up our sleeves and do what we know best – research. For this project we decided not only to run our own study on consumer perceptions of racism and responses to current events, but also to identify the best resources available to educate ourselves and provide valuable learnings for our membership. As part of our effort to help break the cycle of systemic racism, we compiled a collection of useful resources as a starting point for your own efforts.

The sources we found address three main areas: (1) the personal experiences of racism of America, (2) the role of systemic racism, and (3) what you can do in terms of activations and potential CSR partnerships. Collectively, these resources provide context and guidance on what you need to do as a brand to truly make an impact on combating racism.

1. Learn about racism at a personal level

Educate yourself through listening, reading, and watching things that will help you better understand the lived experience for Black people in America. NPR’s Code Switch offers a curated list of books, films, and podcasts for self-education. Here are some other great resources:

  1. PBS’s “Say It Out Loud” is a video series covering topics including Black pride, terminology, history, and pop culture.
  2. The National Museum of African American History and Culture provides guidance on how to begin talking about racism by exploring different topics like bias, being Anti-Racist, and supporting your community.
  3. Pew’s Social Trend Research on race in America helps shed some light into perceptions of and personal experiences with racism across ethnic segments.

2. Understand the history and impact of systemic racism

Our present moment has brought increased scrutiny on the role policing and the criminal justice system has played in perpetuating racism against Black Americans. The organization Mapping Police Violence  offers up to date data on police killings across the United States with a focus on these racial disparities. We at Collage came together to watch and discuss Ava Duvernay’s documentary 13th, which helps connect the dots between slavery, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration in America.

But there is much else we must address beyond criminal justice reform. Economic inequality should also be top of mind, as we see Blacks and Hispanics disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis. In a recent article by CNBC, Mellody Hobson, the -President and Co-CEO of Ariel Investments, and Ken Frazier, the Chairman and CEO of Merck, agree that leadership, job, and financially literacy programs can help rectify the economic imbalance we see today. Here are two additional helpful resources:

  1. The Urban Institute, research and policy organization, offers a collection of data and stories on structural racism.
  2. Brookings dives into the history and statistics behind the racial wealth gap, pointing out exactly how large and persistent it is. McKinsey extends this conversation with powerful insights identifying the unmet financial needs of Black individuals and families.
  3. In his article ‘The Difference Between First-Degree Racism and Third-Degree Racism’ John Rice explains different levels of structural racism. His organization, Management Leadership for Tomorrow, offers career support to youth from underrepresented communities (including Hispanic, Black, and Native American communities).

3. Take action

Now that you have some context, start thinking about what actions you can take as a brand and as a company. Keep in mind the importance of transparency and aligning your actions with your communications. Vox points out how some brands have received major backlash for putting out empty statements of solidarity. It is important to lead by example, so when it comes to taking action, think about what you need to do internally and how you can extend a helping hand locally and nationwide. Below are some examples of how companies can act:

    1. Internally: CNN Business highlights five concrete structural efforts companies can undertake to promote racial justice.
    2. Internally: Pull up for Change is a campaign that pushes brands to be more transparent about their internal diversity by asking them to release such information as their number of total black employees and their the demographics of leadership positions.
    3. Externally: Ben and Jerry’s has long been an unapologetic ally to the Black community. This post serves as an example of best-in-class activation and features some of their social justice partners.
    4. Externally: P&G’s #LetsTalkBias initiative includes short films “The Look” and “The Talk”, along with conversation guides to help drive change through community dialogue.

We sincerely hope you can dedicate time to digest these materials. Whether by yourself, within your teams at work, or even with your families and social spheres, we also hope these resources foster new conversations and willingness to leverage the tools at your disposal in the struggle against racism.

Discover More Insights

How Multicultural Consumers Want Brands to Support Change: Consumer Response to Racism & Current Events

How Multicultural Consumers Want Brands to Support Change: Consumer Response to Racism & Current Events
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Entering the conversation on race can be an intimidating step for your brand, but in this day and age, it’s imperative. Our latest research on current events helps you unpack this topic and provides the guidance you need to take action. Fill out the form to download a sample of the study.

“Unprecedented times:” a label the world has become well-acquainted with since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. But over the past several weeks, public outcry over heinous deaths in the Black community has given new meaning to this phrase. From George Floyd, to Breonna Taylor, to Ahmaud Arbery, and more – Black lives lost at the hands of an inherently racist system have awakened America to the reality of its dark past and broken present.

To help brands understand how Americans are responding to current events and what they can do to support the drive for racial equality, we conducted a survey-based study in June 2020. Below are a few high-level insights and implications from this research. An excerpt of the study is available for download to the right.

Four things you need to know about consumers’ views on racism and related brand actions

  1. Most Americans, but especially Black and Gen Z Americans, recognize the seriousness and pervasiveness of racism in the country

The majority of each segment considers racism to be a very serious problem with Hispanic and Black Americans over-indexing. Additionally, multicultural Americans and Gen Z across segments are more likely to recognize that race impacts how people experience life in the U.S. This is evidence these segments are more in tune with the existence of implicit and systemic racism in the country.

  1. Most Americans recognize the need for significant change to address systemic racism.

Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely than White and Asian Americans to think significant change is needed to achieve racial equality across core institutions like criminal justice, politics, education, health care, and financial systems. These segments are also more likely to think diverse areas of life such as the news, beauty standards, and sports leagues need to change significantly to better reflect the needs, wants, and preferences of non-White Americans.

  1. There is now more risk in remaining silent than taking a stand.

Most consumers expect and demand that brands take a stand. In fact, more than half of all Americans, and roughly two-thirds of Black Americans, think that companies that do not take a stand against racial inequality are part of the problem. Multicultural and Gen Z consumers are more likely to purchase products from companies that make statements about and donate money to causes and organizations they care about.

  1. This time is different: You must take concrete steps beyond statements of support.

Young consumer segments that tend to skew multicultural have well-tuned bullsh*t detectors. They see right through empty promises and virtue-signaling remarks. Brands need to back up their statements of support with concrete actions that show they are serious about driving change.

For more tips on how to be a positive agent of change and details on consumer attitudes and behaviors related to racial justice and current events, download an excerpt of the study above. Contact us for more details.

Discover More Insights

How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company

How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Augmented by early findings from our research into racism in America, our virtual panel discussion with leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel and Walt Disney Company provided powerful new insights into the actions brands need to take now. Replay the entire discussion below.
 

The week of Juneteenth 2020, Collage Group was honored to host a virtual panel discussion with Daneyni Sanguinetti from Coca-Cola, Natasha Aarons from Google Pixel and Brian Walker from Walt Disney Company on the topic of how great brands are confronting racism and injustice. Our sessions was scheduled on short notice after public outrage in the wake of the killings of black individuals and the video footage of white privilege at its worst in Central Park.  We have witnessed an extraordinarily generative moment prompting citizens of all backgrounds across the country to protest for social justice, an end to police violence, and to initiate real meaningful steps toward reducing institutional racism.

As part of our session, we shared early findings from our just-fielded survey of over 2361 consumers on racism and social justice in America.  Full results of this initiative will be published in several weeks, but we provided an excerpt to set discussion with our invited guests.  Wound that the vast majority are feeling “sad,” “frustrated,” and “angry” in response to the recent events, but we also found that 20% of consumers felt “hopeful.”  Indeed, similar positive emotions are significantly stronger among the multicultural community, with Black consumers in particular feeling “motivated” and “empowered” to a degree unmatched by other consumers.

We also asked consumers to report on how big a problem racism is on a scale of 1 to 10  where 1 equates to “not a problem at all” and 10 to “a very serious problem.”  No surprise that the Black community overindexes in response to this questions with 85% scoring it in the range between 8-10, but even a solid majority of White consumers report scores in this range.  Indeed more individuals across every single intersection of race, ethnicity and generation responded with a 10, than with any other score.

The good news is that brands taking a stand are most likely to gain. We asked consumers how they would respond to brands making statements “supporting causes and organizations I care about”, and to brands “donating money to causes and organizations I care about.” The answer: the highest percentage of consumers report they are “more likely to purchase products,” with an around one in ten reporting they would react negatively.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Four Questions to Ask Your Team About America’s Multicultural Consumers

Four Questions to Ask Your Team About America’s Multicultural Consumers
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

We are at a tipping point.

American communities are advocating for change in large numbers and with resounding energy. Is your brand ready to take on the change needed to support America’s multicultural consumers? As you evaluate and prepare to take on this challenge, we suggest you ask your team these four questions:

1. Do we understand the multicultural population in America?

The U.S. demographic landscape has transformed; 129 million multicultural consumers now represent 40% of the population. A deep dive into research and insights on multicultural consumers can help you understand and capture the voice and passions of key growth segments: Black, Hispanic, and Asian.
2. How is our brand perceived among multicultural America, specifically the most influential generations?

An intrinsically diverse youth segment (ages 18-39) has emerged in the U.S. These Gen Z and Millennial consumers, referred to as the New Wave, are highly invested in their beliefs and passions, and orient toward inclusion and diversity not seen in older generations. Evaluating how well your brand(s) and advertising resonate is critical to growth.

3. Do we know how to succeed with multicultural and New Wave consumers?

Powerful traits like exceptionalism and anxiety influence how consumer segments perceive and engage with brands. Improving your understanding of these traits among multicultural consumers can help you recognize, anticipate and influence consumer decision-making in your category. From there, you can develop a framework and a plan to effectively build deep, authentic connections.

4. Are we successfully embedding Cultural Fluency throughout your organization?

Educate your team on your framework so there is an organization-wide understanding. You will need alignment on the language and tone necessary to be relevant and authentic, the themes and stories that resonate with multicultural communities, and the next steps for continued innovation and activation.

Collage Group was founded more than 10 years ago with the mission to help companies develop the cultural fluency required to understand and serve diverse America.

We currently partner with more than 200 brands across 15 industries, including Coca-Cola, Clorox, Disney, Heineken, Hulu, Google, McDonalds, Nestle, Proctor & Gamble, U.S. Bank and many more.

Please contact us to find out more about how we can support you on your journey to Cultural Fluency.

Discover More Insights