How LGBTQ+ Americans Engage With Family

How LGBTQ+ Americans Engage With Family

All Americans value family, but that doesn’t mean it’s one-size-fits-all. Read on to understand the nuances within LGBTQ+ people’s family lives to improve authentic representation and effective connection on the path towards Cultural Fluency.

Human beings are social by nature – this is universally true. No matter our background, we all crave connection. We value family and anchor our lives to our loved ones. Our research confirms that family matters to everyone but is experienced and expressed differently across segments and cultural backgrounds. Read below for several key insights on how LGBTQ+ people engage with family and then download the research for the full picture.

1. There are more LGBTQ+ families than ever before. In just the three years between 2016 and 2019, the number of married same-sex couple households in the United States increased by 61%, and same-sex unmarried partner households increased by 18%. More and more same-sex couples are also raising children.

2. LGBTQ+ people highly value representation of themselves and their families in media and advertising. Two thirds of LGBTQ+ Americans—significantly more than others— say it is important to them that advertisements represent families that look like theirs. And more than 40% of LGBTQ+ Americans want to see more non-traditional family structures represented in marketing content.

3. Every family has its struggles. Sadly, for LGBTQ+ people these struggles can stem from a lack of acceptance from their Non-LGBTQ+ family members. LGBTQ+ people are also significantly more likely to report that arguing about politics is an issue in their families, as well as not supporting each other’s interests and spending too much time distracted by technology.

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Five Lessons from Culturally Fluent Ads | TMRE Presentation

Five Lessons from Culturally Fluent Ads | TMRE Presentation

In this analysis of data from our CultureRate:Ad database, we focus on ads that cross the Cultural Fluency threshold for all four major demographic groups to identify key lessons that can improve creative performance.

Learn more about our CultureRate database 

Our top findings include the following:

1. Obey the Basics: Stay Attuned to Your “Right to Play” to Avoid Confusion and Boredom​

2. Create Texture with Realistic Vignettes of Multicultural Segments

3. Show Firmness and Values About What’s Happening Now

4. Authentically Show the “Human Truth” of Connection to Resonate with All Segments

5. Activate on the “Cultural Truths” of Specific Segments to Drive Deeper Resonance

Fill out the form to download an excerpt from the presentation.

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LGBTQ+ Pride Panel: How Great Brands Are Supporting the LGBTQ+ Community

LGBTQ+ Pride Panel: How Great Brands Are Supporting the LGBTQ+ Community

Collage Group is delighted to have hosted more than 100 consumer insights professionals for a conversation with diversity, marketing and research leaders from Google, AARP, E. & J. Gallo Winery and U.S. Bank.

These brand leaders discussed how they are supporting the rights of and improving the lives of LGBTQ+ Americans. Esteemed panelists included:

• Zach Overton, Google, Director of US Marketing, Devices & Services, Head of U.S. Go-to-Market
• Nii-Quartelai Quartey, EdD, AARP, Multicultural Engagement Lead, COVID-19 Vaccine Education Campaign
• Dan Vu, E. & J. Gallo Winery, Lead of Barefoot Diversity & Inclusion Team
• Steve D. Ducòs, U.S. Bank, Asst Vice President, LGBTQ+ Segment Strategy Leader, Diverse Segments Strategy Team
• Zekeera Belton, Collage Group, Vice President of Client Services

Fill out the form to watch the replay of the panel discussion and learn more in the Collage Group insights presentation for engaging the LGBTQ+ community.

Panelists addressed questions, including:

• What do you think are Corporations’ responsibilities toward LGBTQ+ Americans? 

• Tell us about the steps you, and your company, are taking to authentically engage and support LGBTQ+ community, amplify their voices and drive change.

• What response to gay rights issues have you seen from your company during the past six months?

• What is the current relationship between Diversity and Inclusion and Diverse Segment Marketing – have you seen it change? What do you think the future will hold?

• What do you think the LGBTQ+ community – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

The all-new Collage Group insights, presented by Vice President of Client Services Zekeera Belton and Chief Product Officer David Evans, include results from a recent survey on the LGBTQ+ community’s lived experiences, demographic profile, and attitudes and behaviors specific to Pride Month.

The insights presented were created as part of our newest member research program, LGBTQ+ & Gender, launched in January 2021. As the leading source of consumer insights about diverse America, Collage Group is thrilled to share this expansion into sexuality and gender identity.

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Understanding Black Consumer Passion Points: Music, Fashion and Religion

Understanding Black Consumer Passion Points: Music, Fashion and Religion

Collage Group’s Multicultural Passion Points research includes the latest insights on the topics and activities where multicultural consumers invest their time, money, and enthusiasm.

The research covers Hispanic, Black, Asian and White consumers as part of our Multicultural program, and expands into generation, sexuality and gender in the Generations and LGBTQ+ & Gender Programs.

Passion Points help brands:

• Build authentic creative to ensure messaging campaigns speak to consumer’s lived experiences.
• Evaluate cross-segment opportunities to extend reach through shared passion points.
• Identify opportunities to seamlessly engage consumer passion points, and find a logical fit to connect more deeply with specific consumer segments.

Diving deeper into Black consumer passion points, we identify three of the eight areas (overall) that are uniquely of interest to this segment: music, fashion and religion. Read on for more details and fill out the form for a larger sample of the research.

Movies

Black consumers have distinct tastes for R&B, hip-hop and gospel music when compared to consumers of other races/ethnicities. In particular, seven in ten Black consumers listen to R&B, which marks a truly statistically significant difference when it comes to multicultural consumer music preferences.

Further, Black American consumers enjoy talking about their favorite music the most, with nearly seven out of ten respondents expressing a passion in this area.

Fashion

Clothing that is unique and comfortable is the preference for Black American consumers. Further, all multicultural consumers want clothing that makes them feel confident.

And, nearly 50 percent of Black consumers consider themselves to be stylish or fashionable, with a focus in hair/beard, shoes, jewelry, eyeglasses and makeup.

Religion

Black Americans are most likely to routinely practice religion, and religious and spiritual beliefs influence music choices for more than one in four Black consumers.

Further, nearly half of Black and Hispanic Americans are actively involved in a religious community, ranking higher than Asian (46%) and White (37%) consumers. 

Beyond these top-line findings, Collage Group members have access to insights on why Black Americans, and other segments, over- or under-index on Passion Points, and the nuances brands should be aware of as they activate on these trends.

To learn more, you can download the excerpt above or contact us by filling out the form below.

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Consumer Spotlight: LGBTQ+ and Women Passion Points

Consumer Spotlight: LGBTQ+ & Women Passion Points

Collage Group’s LGBTQ+ & Gender research equips members with a “cultural toolbox” that provides deep insight into consumer segments, enabling brands to authentically engage and communicate with their audience.

One pillar of this cultural research is called Essentials, which gives a 360-degree view of the LGBTQ+ & Women consumer landscape, spread across two different types of content: Cultural Traits and Passion Points. The Cultural Traits are designed to provide you with high level Cultural Attributes and more specific Group Traits to understand critical personality characteristics for a given segment or generational cohort, sexuality, or gender.

The research below is from Passion Points, a study that focuses on the activities that Americans like doing and the interests and enthusiasms they have. If Cultural Traits are the drivers behind decision-making, Passion Points are what Consumers spend their time deciding on. Or as we say, Passion Points are “concrete expressions of culture.”

Movies

Nearly half of the LGBTQ+ segment consider themselves to be a “film buff.” That’s significantly higher than Non—LGBTQ+ by 14 percentage points.

This signifies a deep level of fandom and confidence in their knowledge base about films—focus on films as a serious hobby. This particular attitude may be driven by their passion for representation in storytelling.

When we asked people if they think of themselves as experts or movie buffs, women were significantly less likely to agree. Only one in three women consider themselves movie buffs, while four of ten men agree. This could have something to do with societal pressures on women to be less self-endorsing. They are less likely claim that they’re an expert, but this doesn’t mean that women are less passionate about movies and shows than men are.

Food

Since LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to enjoy staying connected with celebrity news, they’re also more likely to receive their food inspiration from social media. 

In fact, 58% of LGBTQ+ say they get food inspiration from social media and follow food influencers like chefs or other people for recipes.

One interesting way that women’s interest in food differs from that of men is their interest in seasonal foods and drinks. Two thirds of women say their tastes changes throughout the seasons, significantly more than men. Whether this is looking for soups and hearty stews in the cold winter, or trying a special at a restaurant that features fresh summer vegetables, women are flexible and adventurous in their taste. This means that they’re often looking for new recipes, new foods and drinks to try. 

Keep your brand on the cusp of consumer intel with Collage Group's LGBTQ+ & Gender research. Fill out the form below to start a conversation about the benefits of membership.

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Five Consumer Insights for Cinco de Mayo

Five Consumer Insights for Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo is annual celebration that commemorates the date the Mexican Army was victorious over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. It is not Mexico’s Independence Day—a common misconception, which is celebrated in Mexico on September 16th.

Download More Hispanic Insights

In the U.S., Cinco de Mayo is a day of celebration in honor of Mexican culture and heritage.

1. Who celebrates Cinco de Mayo?

Cinco de Mayo is a Mexican holiday popular among bicultural Hispanics. In fact, 40% of Hispanic consumers celebrate Cinco de Mayo, compared to 13% or fewer for consumers of other races. 

2. Among Hispanic consumers, Gen Z describes the Cinco de Mayo celebration as “traditional”, while Boomers are more likely to describe it as “festive.”

For most celebrants, Cinco de Mayo is not just about tequila and partying.

In fact, hispanic consumers are the least likely to rate their Cinco de Mayo celebrations as lively, rowdy, or over-the-top. However, the polarity in generational attitudes toward describing it confirms  what we already know about Gen Z: they respond to authenticity, making them more likely to appreciate traditional approaches to celebrating Cinco De Mayo. 

3. Nearly half of Hispanic consumers (46%) believe American celebrations of Cinco de Mayo misrepresent Hispanic culture. Authenticity is key when engaging Hispanic consumers on this holiday.

In recognition that Avocados from Mexico has an authentic connection with Cinco de Mayo, the brand launched an experiential and social media campaign called “Guac It,” which asks consumers to share their Cinco de Mayo guacamole recipes.

The brand also partnered with three food trucks located in New York City to give out free food made with avocados.

In order to win over the hispanic segment, brands must make it clear that they know the importance and relevance of the holiday. 

4. Hispanic consumers overwhelmingly choose beer as their drink of choice on Cinco de Mayo.

In 2018, beer giant Corona became the Official Import Beer of the Kentucky Derbyaptly scheduled on Cinco De Mayo the following two years.

During this activation, attendees of the Kentucky Derby could join the Corona de Mayo fiesta”, designed to “remind consumers that Cinco de Mayo is the first fiesta of the year and the official start of summer.”  

Corona’s move to partner with the Kentucky Derby shows how important it is to connect with the Hispanic segment by celebrating their culture.

5. 1 in 4 Hispanic consumers says they always drink tequila to celebrate the holiday.

This year, Jose Cuervo launched #CincoToGo, a social media driven campaign geared toward supporting the small restaurants impacted by Covid. In exchange for a free meal, covered by Jose Cuervo, “customers must dine at Mexican restaurants that have 10 outlets or less, keeping the contest focused on patronizing small businesses.” 

This is a great example of how brands can connect with the hispanic segment and enable giving back to their community. 

Interested in learning more about how to authentically engage Hispanic consumers? Fill out the form to download an excerpt from, “Essentials of Hispanic Marketing.”

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Fundamentals of Generational Marketing: Passion Points

Fundamentals of Generational Marketing: Passion Points

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in.

They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture. This research offers brands and marketers important insights to win over consumers from all generational cohorts.

What matters most to Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z?

Our topline results show that consumers generally opt for TV and Movies, Music, and Food. Boomers and Gen Z consumers tend to have more fluctuations in their passions with higher peaks and lower valleys than Gen X and Millennials. Boomers are more likely to say they are interested in religion, while Gen Z over-indexes in music and games. Gen Xers often find themselves between Millennials and Boomers, such as their passion for traveling. 

Millennials, known for their love of new experiences, are significantly more interested in staying active than the older two generations.

Beyond these top-line results, we have much insight as to which generational cohorts over or under-index on various topics such as movies & tv shows, music, food and travel.

Here are four important data points from the study:

1. Movies & TV Shows

On the left, you see the favorite movie genres for the total population. Comedy and Action/Adventure are the overall winners. On the right, though, we see the responses of each generational cohort.

Gen Z and Millennials are more likely to prefer genres like horror (Gen Z), fantasy, and animation, including anime. Gen X and Boomers, however, are more likely to choose a drama, thriller, or science fiction option.

2. Music & Audio

Looking through the chart, you’ll see that the generations have distinct tastes in music genres – at least between older and younger generations. For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But both younger generations under-index on rock music. Especially Gen Z, where only 25 percent say they choose rock. Gen Z and Millennials over-index on liking Hip-Hop and R&B and are more open to K-pop as well.

This is aligned with what we know about younger generations generally – they’re more racially and ethnically diverse, and this is reflected in their diverse music tastes as well.

3. Food

When it comes to food, one big question is whether American consumers consider themselves “foodies,” who prioritize taste and experiential eating, or “health nuts,” who prioritize nutrition and diets. 

Here, we see that more Americans consider themselves “Foodies” than “Health Nuts.”

We also see some interesting generational variation here.

On the left, we see that about half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and that Millennials – at 61 percent – is more likely than all other generations to believe this.  And on the right, we see that less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts.” Gen Z and Gen X consumers hold to that average, but the big differences lie between Millennials and Boomers. 

So far, we’ve seen a lot of trends hold to a younger vs older dichotomy, but when it comes to food-related identity, Millennials really stand out as being food-focused. Boomers are not as focused on considering themselves a foodie or a health nut. While most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Millennial Americans lead the “health nut” trend.

4. Travel

For many people, the main tossup is between domestic versus international travel.

On average at the total population level, consumers are pretty split between the two, but preference for domestic taking a slight lead.

However when we break the data down by generation, we see a pretty clear pattern amongst consumers. 

Younger people have a distinctly stronger desire to travel abroad – especially Gen Z, at 61%, they are significantly more likely than all other generations. Millennials are an even split. Older generations are where we see a stronger preference for domestic travel. Boomers are the most likely generation to prefer traveling within the US over traveling abroad – about three in four. Perhaps driven by a desire to stay closer to home.

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Case Study By Industry | Alcoholic Beverages

Case Study By Industry | Alcoholic Beverages

Amplifying Multicultural Voices with the Science of Culture

CHALLENGE

A leading global portfolio of top alcoholic beverage brands needed to deepen their understanding of culture.

Their North America operation launched an initiative in 2019 to future-proof their brands through a comprehensive “Cultural Fluency” audit of 20 brands including select competitors.

The brand’s goal was to build the organizational capacity to understand younger, intrinsically diverse LDA consumers, a segment Collage Group defines as the New Wave.  The mission was to drive brand growth while providing a platform for motivating internal change.  

Primary Research Objectives:

• Understand key cultural traits of the New Wave Americans, aged 21– 40, and validate them for the alcoholic beverage category.

• Identify where traits and values resonate across diverse segments as well as where they diverge.

• Build a framework and set of principles that can be applied to creative executions across the company’s portfolio.

SOLUTION

Collage Group developed a Cultural Fluency Roadmap to guide the brand in achieving their business objectives. This included:

  1. Quantifying the Cultural Traits of target consumers for their spirit categories. Building in additional layers to understand nuances across age, gender, ethnicity and shared experiences.
  2. Mapping the Cultural Traits of each target consumer segment to key brand equities, to identify growth opportunities and help to prioritize which segments brands should work to address and in what way.
  3. Providing deep creative evaluation of ~20 executions from the brand’s portfolio and competitors, to better understand the “why” behind how these Ads performed across diverse segments, while establishing key metrics for success.

RESULT

Through this intentional approach to becoming more culturally fluent, our client achieved success in two areas, including:

  1. Deeper cultural understanding of how to drive resonance among growth consumer segments, in particular Hispanic and Black consumers.

  2. Key lessons for creating culturally fluent creative and evidence to validate the power of integrating nuanced multicultural insights in authentic stories, that will resonate across a broad audience.

Through Collage Group’s superb client communication and Ad testing, Collage was able to identify key intersections in the Cultural Traits shared by both Hispanic and Black consumers. These included values around generosity, optimism, and community – that were all highlighted within the execution. 

Their ad’s tight storyline and clear messaging over-indexed among consumers across all races and ethnicities, as measured by Collage Group’s CultureRate product, and performed especially well with Hispanics.

These insights enabled the brand to learn exactly why their campaign was a success.  Most importantly, the analysis revealed a key set of cultural principles that could be applied to future executions to make other brands more successful in expanding their consumer base as well.

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Principles for Engaging Younger, More Diverse Consumers: Deep Dive into Gen Z

Principles for Engaging Younger, More Diverse Consumers: Deep Dive into Gen Z
Understanding America’s Diverse Consumers – Part I

Gen Z, the generation born from 1997 to 2012, is one of America’s most influential consumer segments.

One in five Americans are part of this generation and it is the second largest: at 75.6 million people, Gen Z is only slightly smaller than the Millennial generation at 75.8 million. These younger consumers, now 8-to-23 years old, are highly invested in their beliefs and passions, and orient toward inclusion and diversity not seen in older generations.

How can you capture the growing influence and expenditure of this influential, younger consumer segment and earn their loyalty for years to come?

Understanding the unique characteristics of Gen Z Americans – from trends and experiences to expression and entertainment – can help you authentically engage. Collage Group’s Chief Product Officer David Evans explores key areas of our consumer fundamentals for Gen Z in this recent presentation hosted by the Insights Association.

Fill out the form to watch the full presentation and download an excerpt of the deck.

In the full presentation you’ll find a deep dive into Gen Z demographics and economic opportunity, identity-related marketing expectations, cultural traits and passion points. Read below for a five key insights into Gen Z consumers.

1. Gen Z is coming of age in an intrinsically diverse society, with multicultural consumers representing nearly half of all Gen Z Americans.

This generation is among the first in American history to be defined by the multicultural experience, and 27% of Gen Z are first- or second-generation Americans. You cannot appeal to Gen Z Americans without respecting their complex set of identities.

2. Younger generations, specifically Gen Z, are increasingly likely to identify as LGBTQ+.

This is an interesting phenomenon we identified in our research on consumer identity, which suggests that as society is more accepting of the LGBTQ+ community, and people discover the myriad possible identities out there, young people are more willing to embrace their LGBTQ+ identities.

3. Gen Z is on track to be the most educated generation, but this comes at the steepest price in history.

Those entering collage now face approximately $37,650 in tuition and fees for attending a private, nonprofit four-year university.

The confluence of high levels of education, at a high cost, and the difficult economic and social realities of our current climate play into the cultural traits we’ve identified for Gen Z, specifically “pressured” and “skeptical”.

4. Gen Z has grown up in a period of unprecedented uncertainty, adding even more layers to the stresses of adolescence and young adulthood.

Most recently, amid pandemic, economic recession, political polarization and social justice movements, Gen Z has had a lot to bear within a very short span of time. Unsurprisingly, Gen Z is struggling to find balance between meeting others’ expectations and living their desired lives – and much more so than other generations.

5. Gen Z Americans see many challenges standing in the way of their futures that society has failed to address.

These young consumers tend not to trust many institutions and believe brands and corporations should play a role in addressing the problems they face.

Are you interested in learning more about Gen Z consumers and how to apply these insights to your campaigns?

Collage Group’s consumer research database now contains insights from hundreds of studies, thousands of questions and millions of data points on American consumers across ethnicity, generation, sexuality and gender. With more than 35 original studies released each year, you can dive deeper into the cultural traits, identity, passion points and more of Gen Z Americans, as well as other high-grow diverse consumers.

Through our Generations consumer research platform you can access to the insights you need to understand and engage the attitudes, behaviors and values of all generational segments: Gen Z, Millennial, Gen X and Boomer. Contact us to learn more.

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Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

What matters most to American consumers across racial and ethnic segments? Collage Group's latest study covers major Multicultural Passion Points your brand can act on immediately.

What are Passion Points?

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 Passion Points we know Americans care deeply about. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started, let’s look at some topline findings about the things that matter most across both segments and the Passion Points themselves.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

When we asked people if they like watching movies in theaters more than at home, and if they prefer “enhanced” movie experiences, like IMAX or 3D, less than half of the total population agreed. But it’s the Non-Hispanic White segment which is driving this low agreement. Multicultural segments were more likely to say they prefer watching movies in theaters, and that they prefer IMAX and 3D movie experiences.

When we double click into acculturation, we see that bicultural and unacculturated Hispanics are the ones really driving the Hispanic desire for theaters and enhanced movie experiences.  Acculturated Hispanic consumers are less likely to enjoy watching movies in theaters (42%H ; Bi: 54% ; Un: 63%H), or having an “enhanced” movie experience (41%H ; Bi: 56% ; Un: 56%).

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Which genres are most popular across multicultural segments?

For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But all three multicultural segments under-index on rock music. Especially the Black segment, where only 11 percent say they choose rock! What do these consumers listen to instead? 

For Black Americans, the answer is R&B – seven in ten Black consumers choose R&B over other genres. Black consumers are also most likely to listen to Hip-Hop, Jazz, Blues, Soul, and Gospel music.

For Asian Americans, the answer is Pop music – half of Asian consumers say they choose Pop over other genres. Asian consumers are also most likely to choose electronic and K-Pop music.

And for Hispanic Americans, the most popular music genre is Latin Pop, including Reggaeton. About a third of Hispanic consumers say they choose this genre over other options.

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

About half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and the Black segment – at 56 percent – is more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers believe this.

We also see that while less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts,” all multicultural segments are more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers to do so.

While only a quarter of White consumers are “health nuts,” over a third of Asian, Black, and Hispanic consumers are. With Unacculturated Hispanic consumers being the most likely, at 48 percent, compared to the other Hispanic Acculturation segments.

And while most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Multicultural Americans lead the “health nut” trend. 

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

When we asked consumers to choose between traveling domestically or internationally, most of the Hispanic and Asian segments chose international travel. As you can see on the chart, only 48 percent – about half – of Hispanic consumers chose domestic travel, and even fewer – 38 percent – of Asian respondents opted for the U.S. option. Within the Hispanic segment, bicultural and unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely than their acculturated peers to prefer international travel.

The Black and Non-Hispanic White consumer segments, on the other hand, prefer domestic over international travel.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Multiselect, Max. 3

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Forced choice

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

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