Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality

,
Three Steps to Connect with Young Multicultural Americans on Racial Equality
Young Multicultural Americans are committed to racial equality in the U.S. today and are demanding brands do their part by speaking out and supporting people who look like them. Read on to learn three ways your brand can engage younger Multicultural Americans on this key issue.

Americans’ Awareness about racism and race-relations in the U.S. is at an all-time high. The racial reckoning of 2020, the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes, and the heightened awareness around Hispanic immigration to America has disproportionately affected Multicultural Americans who call the U.S. home.

Fill out the form for more details on the research and read on for key insights and implications:

In our recent America Now study, we looked at the total population and their perceptions around racism and other major issues happening in America today.

Younger Americans (aged 18-40 years old at the end of 2021) tend to be more Multicultural and they embrace diversity in their professional, personal and even consumer lives. Given their distinct profile we wanted to better understand younger Multicultural Americans’ perspectives towards combatting racial injustice. This is an issue brands can take a stand on, and it turns out, that is what Multicultural Americans want.

Our study found that young Multicultural Americans see their race and ethnicity as an increasingly important part of their identity. Many also believe that negative stereotypes exist simply because of what they look like, and that the media often mispresents Americans of their race and ethnicity, which can propagate negative stereotypes.

To address negative stereotypes and misrepresentation in the media, younger Multicultural Americans believe brands need to take bold action. They want them to speak out against racism.

And they want brands to actively support people who match their own race and ethnicity.

Our research shows us there are three key steps brands can take when it comes to engaging the younger Multicultural consumer in the fight for racial equality.

1) Ensure authentic representation

Ensuring authentic representation goes beyond including Multicultural people in ads. Younger Multicultural Americans want authentic portrayals that include what their families and communities are like as well as accurate portrayals of their life values. They also want brands to help break down the negative stereotypes they have experienced too often.

2) Pick a side

Picking a side includes, but is not limited to, making public statements in the fight for racial justice. It means that in addition to statements, brands will act, whether through financial donations or putting pressure on the government to enact local or national change that supports the cause.

3) Lead from within

Lastly, younger Multicultural Americans want brands to lead from within their own organizations by diversifying internally, committing to a more diverse leadership pipeline, and providing better training to address racial bias. Walking the walk means something to these Americans.

So what can you do to help your brand showcase your commitment to racial justice in America?

Some important next steps:

  1. Go beyond one-dimensional representation in your advertising to capture the totality of Multicultural consumers.
  2. Share efforts your brand or company has taken in the fight for racial equality widely with your audience.
  3. Conduct an internal audit to understand the company’s strengths and weaknesses in the areas of diversity and inclusion. Share positive results widely as well as an improvement plan.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres

, ,
How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres
Mother’s Day is an important holiday for Americans of all backgrounds, but Multicultural segments—especially moms and dads versus non-parents—have nuanced attitudes and celebration styles. Read on for insights curated from our Holidays and Occasions research.

Mother’s Day is one of Americans’ most beloved holidays. It’s a day dedicated to Moms (and maternal figures), honoring their important role in the family. 85% of Americans celebrate it, with an especially strong emphasis from Hispanic Americans (91%). Mother’s Day has the fourth highest average per-person spending of any holiday or occasion according to the National Retail Federation. Mother’s Day occurs every second Sunday of May, which means this year (2022), it will be on May 8th.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

However, it’s important to note that while motherhood is celebrated all over the world, it doesn’t always occur on the same date as it does in the United States. For instance, some Latin American countries such as Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala celebrate Mother’s Day (El Día de las Madres) on May 10th every year. Many Hispanic-American consumers with heritage from these countries, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, may prefer to uphold the tradition on the day from their country of origin instead of—or in addition to—the date Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. So, this is an important nuance not to be overlooked when activating on multicultural consumers. Plus, it offers an additional day to connect with your brand’s target consumer groups!

As your brand strategizes on how best to resonate with multicultural consumers, take note of the key similarities and differences in how each racial and ethnic segment (as well as differences among Parents and Non-Parents of each demographic) perceives of and celebrates Mother’s Day. Download the attached presentation and read on for key insights and takeaways.

Key Insight #1:

Hispanic Americans are highly involved on Mother’s Day, and this is true for both Parents and Non-Parents. They have higher celebration rates compared to other segments and are usually more likely to participate in celebration activities like hosting a barbecue/cookout, giving cards, and buying gifts.

A Deeper Look:

For Hispanic Americans, Mother’s Day is a family affair. Everyone comes together to honor the matriarch of the family. “It’s important to celebrate mothers because they are the building blocks of the family and they are the teachers,” says Maria Miranda, assistant director of the Arizona Latino Arts and Culture Center. Typical celebrations include extended family gatherings with plenty of food, music, and flowers.

Collage Group’s research on Family Connection underscores the importance of family relationships for Hispanic Americans. Mother’s Day is a natural extension of the segment’s love and appreciation for close family bonds and festive gatherings.

Action Step:

Acknowledge Hispanic Americans’ culturally-dual Mother’s Day celebrations, including the difference in celebration dates, through your marketing efforts. Incorporate the nuances that Hispanic Americans consider meaningful aspects of the holiday, such as large family gatherings with food and music.

Key Insight #2:

Black and Asian parents (both Moms and Dads) feel especially strongly about celebrating ALL the women in their life for Mother’s Day.

A Deeper Look:

Our research on Cultural Traits has showed us that these two segments are highly community-oriented, which likely explains their stronger association with Mother’s Day as a holiday honoring all women. Parents of these segments are particularly attuned to the role that other women in their communities play in raising their children, such as sisters, aunts, cousins, Godmothers, and friends.

For the Black segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the community’s history of adversity and the necessity to create a strong network of support for one another. It’s possible that as many Black Americans become parents themselves, they reflect even more strongly on the role that many women in their community had played in helping to raise them. 

For the Asian segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the segment’s cultural emphasis on respect and humility. Many Asian countries are more collectivist, meaning that social norms prioritize the community over the individual. This may help explain why Asian Parents would be more likely to want to recognize the contributions of all women on Mother’s Day. 

Action Step:

Create cross-cultural appeal by expanding your brand’s Mother’s Day marketing efforts to be inclusive of all women that play an important maternal or supporting role in the family. Connection with others is a theme that consumers across backgrounds resonate with universally. Be sure to infuse authentic cultural cues and segment-specific nuances to connect deeply both within segments, as well as across segments.

Contact us via the form below to learn more about how you can access deeper insights on our cultural intelligence platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Essentials of Women Consumers

Essentials of Women Consumers
Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research for American Women: demographics and segment context, identity, and Group Traits.

Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural, and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all household purchasing decisions. But many advertisers are missing the mark in their portrayals of this powerful consumer segment. While gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman in recent years, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Read on and fill out the form for more insights from our American Women research.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Brands today must evolve to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographicsidentity, and Group Traits to help your brand authentically connect with Women.

Download the attached presentations and watch the webinar replay below for more. In the meantime, take a look at a few key insights and action steps:

Key Insight #1:

Young women are especially likely to report their gender has become increasingly important over the past few years.

My gender has become increasingly important

A Deeper Look:

The greater focus on intersectional identities over the past few years has made it easier for younger people to embrace and recognize the importance of all aspects of their identity, including the important role gender plays, especially in the lives of women.

Action Step:

Bring a nuanced portrayal of women today to your marketing efforts – relatable specificity beats painting with too broad of a brush here.

Key Insight #2:

Women across age ranges are more likely than men to say that the only achievement they care about is being happy with what they do.

A Deeper Look:

Many Women have begun to reject #GirlBoss culture and the pressure to prove themselves as equally ambitious as men. Instead, they’re redefining what success means altogether – and doing it on the individual level.

Action Step: Let go of traditional, patriarchal definitions of success and instead, portray success on individualistic terms. Acknowledge that women have the power to choose the direction of their lives – and the choices are as unique as the individual.

Key Insight #3:

Women are particularly mindful about what they say and how it may affect others. They are much less likely than Men to speak their mind if it might hurt someone’s feelings.

I speak my mind even when it hurts feelings

A Deeper Look:

Women tend to have different emotional intelligence (EQ) strengths than men, such as higher levels of empathy, greater mindfulness in interpersonal relationships, and a stronger sense of social responsibility–all of which culminate in conscientiousness toward others.

Action Step: Portrayals of Women should highlight their soft skills as their superpower–and steer clear of portraying emotion and empathy as a pitfall or stereotypical trope.

Key Insight #4:

Women often feel uncomfortable putting their own needs first and feel a stronger obligation than Men to take care of others.

I do not feel comfortable putting my needs first

A Deeper Look:

Women’s discomfort with putting their own needs first before taking care of others is likely tied to longstanding social norms and gender roles. This feeling could also be tied to lack of self-confidence or self-worth. Women’s sense of obligation may also be out of necessity, since Women often face more pressures and stresses than Men.

Action Step: Give Women the space and permission to prioritize themselves and help alleviate the everyday pressures they face.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women

Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women
Collage Group Hosts A Conversation About Gender Equity with Pandora, TVOne, JAFRA and Diageo in Celebration of Women’s History Month Discussion.

Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman?

Read on and fill out the form to watch the replay and hear how brand leaders responded.

Collage Group had the pleasure of hosting four leaders from our member brands to explore insights and ideas for brands to support women and gender equality. Fill out the form to watch a replay of the presentation and panel discussion, and download an excerpt of the insights:

Collage Group Director of Product & Content Natalie Griffith kicked off the event with cultural intelligence on the demographic profile and cultural traits of women consumers, as well as insights from our Holidays & Occasions work specific to Women’s History Month.

Natalie’s presentation was followed by a conversation with Collage Group member panelists moderated by Zekeera Belton, Vice President of Client Services. Panelists included:

    • Nicole Buchanan, Pandora, National Sales and Strategy Lead, Multicultural Growth Segments
    • Audrey Cochran, TVOne, Vice President, Research
    • Andrea Hernandez, JAFRA, Sr. Brand Marketing Manager, U.S.
    • Tatiana Stadukhina, Diageo, Vice President, Johnnie Walker & Buchanan’s

Panelists answered key questions about their challenges and successes in authentically engaging and supporting women, including:

Q1: Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. How has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage women consumers – and harness the power of their influence?

Q2: Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising. How has your brand worked to address this – and other challenges – to effective portrayals of American women?

Q3: The disruptions caused by the pandemic have disproportionately impacted women, specifically working moms, and could lead to long-lasting consequences for gender equality in the workplace. How is your brand supporting the modern American woman and taking steps to authentically support gender equality and drive progress?

Q4: How is your brand or company applying consumer insights on American women to support Diversity and Inclusion efforts, such as addressing the gender pay gap?

Q5: What do you think women – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px